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Full text of "East Carolina Teachers College Bulletin, 1947-1948"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Joyner Library, East Carolina University 



http://www.archive.org/details/eastcarolinateac38east 



Vol. 38 May 1947 No. 2 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 

1947-1948 



Greenville, North Carolina 



Published four times each year — March, May, August 
and December. 

Entered as second-class matter March 16, 1936, at the 

post office at Greenville, N. C, under the act of Congress 

August 24, 1912. 



PRESSES OF 

CHRISTIAN PRINTING COMPANY 

DURHAM. N. C. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

College Calendar 5 

Trustees 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Faculty 9 

Committees of the Faculty 16 

Special Notice to Students 17 

General Information 19 

Classified Enrollment 21 

Objectives of the College 23 

College Buildings 26 

Publications 29 

Organizations 30 

Expenses and Fees 35 

Withdrawals, Refunds, Credits 37 

Student Loan Funds 37 

Scholarships 39 

Admission Requirements 41 

Extension and Correspondence 44 

Freshman Registration 44 

Summer Quarter 45 

Teachers' Certificates 47 

Student-Teaching and Placement Service 54 

Academic Regulations 57 

Classification 57 

Grades and Scholarship 59 

Requirements for Graduation 61 

Curricula Offered 65 

Requirements for A. B. Degree 65 

Requirements for B.S. Degree 69 

Graduate Instruction 74 

Requirements for the Master's Degree 75 

Courses of Instruction: 

Administration and Supervision 79 

Art 82 

Business Education 86 

Education 96 

English 105 

Foreign Languages 112 

Geography 119 

Health and Physical Education 125 

Home Economics 134 

Industrial Arts 140 

Library Science 143 

Mathematics 145 

Music Education 152 

Applied Music — Individual Instruction 157 

Group Instruction 157 

Psychology 158 

Natural Science 161 

Social Studies 171 

History 176 

Sociology 181 

Roster of Students ? 183 



1947 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


5 M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


8 M T W T F 8 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

SEPTEMBER 


8 M T W T F 8 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

DECEMBER 


MARCH 


JUNE 


S M T W T F 8 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


8 M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


1948 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


8 M T W T F 8 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


8 M T W T F 8 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


8 M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 18 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 


S M T W T F 8 

1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 

JUNE 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


S M T W T F 8 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


8 M T W T F 8 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


8 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F 8 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


S M T VV T F 8 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 





COLLEGE CALENDAR 1947-1948 



Summer Quarter 1947 

June 5 Thursday — Registration for first term 

June 6 Friday — Class work begins 

June 12 Thursday — Last day to register 

July 4 Friday — Holiday 

July 11 Friday — Examinations, first term ends 

July 14 Monday — Registration for second term 

July 15 Tuesday — Class work begins 

July 21 Monday — Last day to register 

Aug. 21 Thursday — Examinations for second term 

Aug. 22 Friday — Summer school closes — Commencement 
exercises 

Fall Quarter 1947 

Sept. 23-24 Tuesday and Wednesday — Freshman registration 

Sept. 25 Thursday — Registration of upperclassmen 

Sept. 26 Friday — Class work begins 
Oct. 9 Thursday — Last day to register 

Nov. 26 Wednesday, 12 M — Thanksgiving holidays begin 
Dec. 1 Monday, 8 A.M. — Class work resumed 

Dec. 18 Thursday, 12 M — Examinations for Fall Quarter 
close and Christmas holidays begin 

Winter Quarter 1948 

Jan. 2 Friday — Registration and classification 
Jan. 3 Saturday — Class work begins 
Jan. 16 Friday — Last day to register 

Mar. 20 Saturday, 12 M — Examinations for Winter Quarter 
close 



Spring Quarter 1948 

Mar. 22 Monday — Registration and classification 

Mar. 23 Tuesday — Class work begins 

Mar. 26 Friday, 12 M — Spring holidays begin 

Mar. 31 Wednesday, 8 A.M. — Class work resumed 

April 6 Tuesday — Last day to register 

June 3 Thursday, 12 M — Examinations for Spring Quarter 

close 
June 5 Saturday to June 7, Monday — Commencement 

exercises 



East Carolina Teachers College 



Summer Quarter 1948 

June 9 Wednesday — Registration for first term 

June 10 Thursday — Class work begins 

June 16 Wednesday — Last day to register 

July 16 Friday — Examinations — first term ends 

- >^July 19 Monday — Registration for second term 

July 20 Tuesday — Class work begins 

July 26 Monday — Last day to register 

Aug. 26 Thursday — Examinations for second term 

J\.ug. 27 Friday — Summer school closes — Commencement 

^ exercises 



I. ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Address 
Clyde A. Erwin, State Superintendent 

of Public Instruction, Chairman 

ex officio Raleigh 

F. C. Harding Greenville 

Arthur B. Corey Greenville 

J. Herbert Waldrop Greenville 

Mrs. Frank L. Greathouse Rocky Mount 

Warren Williams Sanford 

T. T. Hamilton Wilmington 

Mrs. Charles M. Johnson Raleigh 

Thomas J. Hackney Wilson 

R. M. Garrett Greenville 

Henry Belk Goldsboro 

C P. Morris Hertford 

Hugh G. Horton Williamston 



Term 
Expires 



1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1949 
1949 
1949 
1949 
1951 
1951 
1951 
1951 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Clyde A. Erwin 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Ex Officio Chairman 

Agnes W. Barrett, Secretary 

F. D. Duncan, Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman 

J. Herbert Waldrop 



F. C. Harding 



BUDGET-BUILDING COMMITTEE 

R. M. Garrett, Chairman Mrs. Charles M. Johnson 

Thomas J. Hackney 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



General Officers 

Dennis H. Cooke, A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D President 

R. J. Slay, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean 

Howard J. McGinnis, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Registrar 

F. D. Duncan, B.S Treasurer and Business Manager 

Annie L. Morton, A.B Dean of Women 

Frederick P. Brooks, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D. 

Resident Physician 

Junius H. Rose, A.B., M.A Director of Laboratory Schools 

Wendell W. Smiley, A.B., M.A Librarian 

Assistant Officers 

Agnes W. Barrett Secretary to the President 

Ola S. Ross Assistant Registrar 

Ruby Braxton, A.B Secretary to the Registrar 

Ellen B. Bowen Secretary, Placement Office 

Geraldine A. Scruggs, B.S Secretary to the Dean 

E. Harrison Stallings Accountant 

Mrs. Mildred Owens Accountant 

Janie Eakes Council, A.B Secretary to the Treasurer 

Dorothy Lewis, A.B..* Cashier 

Mrs. Louise Woolridge Stenographer 

Mrs. Lucy Connelly Stenographer 

Mrs. L. L. Rives, A.B Dining Hall Stewardess 

Mrs. Rose Harrell Dietitian 

Camille Clark, A.B Assistant Dietitian 

Ruth White, A.B Assistant Dean of Women 

Sallie Norwood, A.B Dormitory Counselor 

Katherine Davis, A.B Dormitory Counselor 

Kathleen Venters Dormitory Housekeeper 

Stella Grogan, R.N Superintendent of the Infirmary 

Lucy Stokes, R.N Assistant Superintendent of the Infirmary 

Mrs. Ruth Garner, A.B., M.A Alumni Secretary 

Mrs. Susie Webb Secretary, Alumni Office 

Margaret Sammon, A.B Assistant Librarian 

J. L. Russell Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

G. E. Barber, A.B. in M.E Engineer 

L. W. Tracy Electrician 

W. E. Boswell Superintendent of the Laundry 



FACULTY— 1946-1947 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION 

J. L. OPPELT, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Acting Director 

A.B., Otterbein, Westerville, Ohio; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

HOWARD J. McGINNIS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Diploma, State Normal School, West Virginia; B.S., University of West Virginia; 
M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

JEAN McIVER LANE, A.B., M.A., Acting Director 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
member Carnegie Scholarship group, summer 1945. 

MARY KATHRYN HUDSON, A.B., A.M. 

A.B., Western Maryland College; A.M., Ohio University. 

PAUL E. POWELL, B.S., M.S. 

B.S., State University, Ohio; M.S., Stout Institute, Wisconsin. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION— PSYCHOLOGY 

CARL L. ADAMS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

A.B., Bethel College, Kentucky; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; post doctor- 
ate srudy: Harvard Medical School. 

LUCILE CHARLTON, B.S., MA. 

University of Georgia, Normal Department; State Normal School, Athens, Georgia; 
B.S., M.A., George Peabody College. 

DORA E. COATES, A.B., MA. 

A.B., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; graduate study: Northwestern University. 

HUBERT C. HAYNES, A.B., LL.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., LL.B., M.A., Mercer University; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

ANNIE C. NEWELL, B.S., MA. 

Diploma, State Normal School, Trenton, N. J.; B.S., M.A., Diploma in Kinder- 
garten, Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study: Cornell Univer- 
sity; Teachers College, Columbia University. 

FRANCES WAHL, B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas; B.S., George Peabody College; 
M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study: George Peabody 
College; Northwestern University. 



10 East Carolina Teachers College 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

E. R. BROWNING, B.C.S., A.B., M.Ed., D.Ed., Director 

B.C.S., Bowling Green Business University; A.B., Marshall College; M.Ed., Duke 
University; D.Ed., Colorado State College of Education. 

NORMAN CAMERON, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Elon College; M.A., University of Kentucky. 

AUDREY V. DEMPSEY, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education; graduate study: Woodbury College, 
Los Angeles; Gregg College, Chicago. 

LENA C. ELLIS, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Bowling Green Business University; A.B., M.A., State Teachers College, 
Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

VELMA WOOLRIDGE LOWE, B.A., M.A. 
B.A., M.A., University of Tennessee. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

ALICE LUCILE TURNER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; graduate study: University of Chicago. 

MARIE B. BROWNING, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Marshall College, W. Va.; M.A., Duke University. 

LUCILE CHARLES, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; M.A,. 
Yale University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

MARY HEMPHILL GREENE, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: University of Chicago; 
University of North Carolina. 

LOUISE GREER, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Emory and Henry College; M.A, University of Virginia; Graduate study: Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 

LOIS GRIGSBY, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

EMMA L. HOOPER, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., University of Virginia; graduate 
study: Northwestern University. 

MEREDITH NEILL POSEY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

JAMES L. FLEMING, B.S., M.A., Director 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Harvard University; Diplomas Alliance Francaise, Universite 
de Paris, France. 

MARGUERITE ZELLE AUSTIN, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., Duke University. 



Administration and Instruction 11 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

P. W. PICKLESIMER, B.Ped., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.Ped., Berea College; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

W. A. BROWNE, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., State Teachers College, Springfield, Mo.; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

JAMES B. CUMMINGS, B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Memphis, Tennessee; B.S., M.A., George Peabody 
College; Graduate "study: State Teachers College, Greeley, Colorado. 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

FREDERICK P. BROOKS, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Director 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; M.D., University of Michigan. 

JOHN L. CAMERON, A.B. 

A.B., Elon College; graduate study: Columbia University and the University of 
North Carolina. 

JAMES JOHNSON, A.B. 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; graduate study: University of North Carolina. 

HOWARD G. PORTER, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Kansas City University; M.A., University of Missouri. 

NELL STALLINGS, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 

THURSA STEED, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., M.A.. Peabody College. 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

ADELAIDE E. BLOXTON, B.S., M.S., Director 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., Columbia University; gradaute study: 
University of North Carolina. 

LILAH R. GAUT, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Chicago. 

MABEL LACY, A.B., B.S., M.A. 

A.B., Milligan College; B.S., Teachers College, Johnson City, Tennessee; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. 

NELLIE F. McGEE, B.S., M.S. 

B.S., Kent State Teachers College, Ohio; M.A., Columbia University. 

ALTA MARIE OSBORN, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky. 

MARY D. POINDEXTER, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Texas State College for Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

VIRLYNNE USRY, B.S., M.S. 

B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., Iowa State College. 



12 East Carolina Teachers College 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

WENDEL W. SMILEY, A.B., A.B. in Library Science, M.A., 
Director 

A.B., University of North Carolina; A.B., in Library Science, University of North 
Carolina; M.A., University of Illinois. 

DALE BENTZ, A.B., A.B. in Library Science 

A.B., Gettysburg College; A.B. in Library Science, University of North Carolina. 

MARGARET SAMMON, B.S. 

Certificate, Bessy Tift College; B.S., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

ELIZABETH SCOTT WALKER, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., M.A., Duke University; A.B. in Library Science, University of North Carolina. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

KENNETH E. BROWN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.S., Central State Teachers College, Oklahoma; M.A., Colorado College of Educa- 
tion; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

KRISTINE BROWN, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Colorado College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

ELLEN RION CALDWELL, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

LOUISE WILLIAMS, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate 
study: Teachers College, Columbia University. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

KARL V. GILBERT, Mus. Doc, Director 

Mus. Doc, Geneva College; Teachers Diploma and Music Diploma, Philadelphia 
Musical Academy; Eastman School of Music; Berkshire Music Center, Tangle- 
wood, Mass.; New York University. 

MARTHA CAMMACK, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., M.A., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

HERBERT L. CARTER, B. of Mus. Ed., M.A. 

B. of Mus. Ed., Murray State Teachers College, Kentucky; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

ELIZABETH DRAKE, B.S. in Music; M.S. 

B.S., Music, Woman's College, U. N. C; M.S. in Piano, Julliard School of Music. 

GUSSIE KUYKENDALL, B.S. 

B.S., George Peabody College; graduate study: Teachers College, Columbia University. 

DAN E. VORNHOLT, B.M., M.A. 

B.M., M.A., University of Wisconsin. 



Administration and Instruction 13 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE 

CHARLES W. REYNOLDS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

A.B., Kentucky Wesleyan; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

B. B. BRANDT, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.S., Mississippi State College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

MARY CAUGHEY, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.S., Geneva College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; Ph.D., Duke 
University. 

J. O. DERRICK, B.A., M.S. 

B.A., M.S., University of South Carolina. 

BESSIE C. PICKLESIMER, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College. 

CHRISTINE WILTON, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

B.S., University of Arkansas; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

ARTHUR D. FRANK, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

LAWRENCE BREWSTER, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., William and Mary; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Duke University. 

BEECHER FLANAGAN, B.Ped., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.Ped., Berea College; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; post doctorate 
study: University of Texas. 

E. C. HOLLAR, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Teachers College, Warrensburg, Missouri; M.A., University of Missouri; gradu- 
ate study: George Peabody College. 

W. E. MARSHALL, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., M.A., University of Texas; Graduate study: University of Texas. 

DAVID MILLER, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Elon College; M.A., George Peabody College. 

PAUL MURRAY, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Ph.B., M.A., Emory University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

LAURA T. ROSE, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: George 
Peabody College. 

PAUL A. TOLL, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., Wilmington College, Ohio; M.A., Haverford College, Pa.; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 



14 East Carolina Teachers College 

TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Campus Training School 

FRANCES WAHL, B.S., M.A., Principal 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas; B.S., George Peabody College; 
M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study: George Peabody 
College; Northwestern University. 

ANNE L. REDWINE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, First Grade 

North Carolina College for Women; A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; MA. and 
Supervisor's Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University. 

RUTH FAISON, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, First Grade 

A.B., Woman's College of The University of North Carolina; graduate study: East 
Carolina Teachers College; M.A. and Supervisor's Diploma, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

LUCY NULTON, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Second Grade 

B.S., George Peabody College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

CHRISTINE JOHNSTON, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Second 
Grade 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

EUNICE McGEE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Third Grade 

A.B., Piano Certificate, La Grange College, La Grange, Georgia; graduate study: 
George Peabody College, Emory University, University of Georgia, Columbia 
University; M.A., Oglethorpe University. 

MRS. J. L. SAVAGE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Third Grade 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

ALMA BROWNING, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Fourth 
Grade 

Normal Diploma, State Teachers College, Murfreesboro, Tenn.; B.S., M.A., George 
Peabody College; graduate study: University of Iowa, George Peabody College. 

LOUISE GALPHIN, A.B., M.Ed., Critic Teacher, Fourth 
Grade 

A.B., Winthrop College; M.Ed., Duke University. 

CLEO RAINWATER, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade 

Diploma, State Normal School, Athens, Ga.; B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; 
graduate study: University of Iowa. 

RUTH MODLIN, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Graduate study: University of Georgia. 

ELIZABETH HYMAN, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Sixth 
Grade 

A.B., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

EVA KEETER, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Seventh Grade 

B.S., George Peabody College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 



Administration and Instruction 15 

Greenville High School 

LAURA MATTOCKS BELL, A.B., M.S., Critic Teacher, Com- 
merce 

A.B., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

MRS. MAUDE BOWEN, A.B., Critic Teacher, English 

A.B., Woman's College, University of North Carolina. 

BOLEY FARLEY, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Physical 
Education 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. * 

MRS. MARGARET FARLEY, A.B., B.S., in Library Science, 
Critic Teacher, Library Science 

A.B., B.S. in Library Science, Woman's College, U. N. C. 

ALLIE ESTELLE GREENE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, 
Mathematics 

Columbia University, Vanderbilt University; A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers 
College. 

DEANIE BOONE HASKETT, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, 
English 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

MRS. EDNA JAMES, A.B., Critic Teacher, Home Economics 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College. 

FRANCES PEELE LAMB, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Social 
Science 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

JESSIE BELLE LEWIS, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, English 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 

HAROLD McDOUGLE, A.B., Critic Teacher, Music 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College. 

MRS. HOWARD MIMS, A.B., Critic Teacher, French and 
Spanish 

A.B., Woman's College, U. N. C 

E. R. ROBINSON, A.B., MA., Critic Teacher, Science 

A.B., Union College; M.A., Columbia University. 

ONA SHINDLER, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Music 

A.B., De Pauw University; M.A., New York University. 

ROBERT B. STARLING, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Social 
Science 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

ALICE STRAWN, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Home Eco- 
nomics 

B.S., College of Industrial Arts; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

CHRISTINE WILLIAMS TRIPP, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, 

Science 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 



16 East Carolina Teachers College 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Committee Chairman 

Policies Dennis H. Cooke 

A.B. Degree A. D. Frank 

B.S. Degree Lucile Turner 

M.A. Degree E. R. Browning 

Pre-Professional Charles W. Reynolds 

Advisory Committee on 

Graduate Instruction P. W. Picklesimer 

Intercollegiate Athletics Carl L. Adams 

Student Government Advisory Board R. J. Slay 

Standards in Written Composition M. N. Posey 

Commencement W. E. Marshall 

Entertainment Marguerite Austin 

Discipline E. R. Browning 

Social-Faculty Beecher Flanagan 

Publicity and Public Relations Mary H. Greene 

Library Wendell W. Smiley 

Publications R. J. Slay 

Assembly and Chapel James L. Fleming 

Alumni Association Executive Board Emma L. Hooper 

Classification and Credits Howard J. McGinnis 

Service Men's Counseling B. B. Brandt 

Radio W. E. Marshall 

Social Calendar and Schedule P. A. Toll 

Field Service H. C. Haynes 

Homecoming Dora E. Coates 

Christenbury Memorial Award Agnes Barrett 

Placement Service J. L. Oppelt 

Women's Athletics Nell Stallings 

Student Loan Fund F. D. Duncan 

Self -Help J. B. Cummings 



General Information 17 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The catalogue of East Carolina Teachers College, issued 
in the spring of each year, is intended to give such a 
description of the work of the College and such a digest 
of its regulations as are needed by students. Although 
the courses announced and the regulations given are 
fairly continuous from year to year, neither of them is 
valid beyond the succeeding year, for before the end of 
the succeeding year a new catalog will have been issued, 
superseding all previous catalogs. 

Ordinarily a student may expect to be allowed to se- 
cure a diploma or a degree in accordance with the re- 
quirements of the curriculum laid down in the catalog 
in force when he first entered the College (see regula- 
tions) or in any subsequent catalog published while he 
is a student; but the faculty reserves the right to make 
changes in curricula and in regulations at any time when 
in its judgment such changes are for the best interests 
of the students and of the College. 



H. GENERAL INFORMATION 

East Carolina Teachers College was established by an 
Act of the General Assembly, ratified the 8th day of 
March, 1907, under the name of East Carolina Teachers 
Training School. The Charter is found in Consolidated 
Statutes, Chapter 96. It was amended by the Extra Ses- 
sions in 1920, 1921, and 1925. The name of the College 
was changed to East Carolina Teachers College by an 
Act of the Legislature in 1921. 

The Charter states that the College shall be coeduca- 
tional — "maintained by the State for the purpose of 
giving young white men and women such education and 
training as shall fit and qualify them to teach in the 
public schools of North Carolina." 

The Acts of 1933 abolished free tuition and authorized 
the Trustees of the College "to fix the tuition fees in such 
amount or amounts as they may deem best . . .," ". . . all 
students in the State institution of higher learning shall 
be required to pay tuition . . . except such students as are 
physically disabled. . . ." 

The Board of Trustees shall consist of twelve members 
appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. 
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be 
ex officio Chairman of the Board. Each appointed mem- 
ber shall serve for a period of six years or until his suc- 
cessor has been appointed and qualified. 

The Board of Trustees shall have the power to pre- 
scribe the course of study; shall make no rules that dis- 
criminate against one county in favor of another in the 
admission of students; may decline to admit young men 
into the rooms of the dormitory; shall retain all rights 
and titles (to property) acquired for the use and benefit 
of the College; and shall report the operation of the Col- 
lege biennially to the Governor before the meeting of 
each General Assembly. 



20 East Carolina Teachers College 

LOCATION 

The College is located in the City of Greenville, Pitt 
County, North Carolina. Greenville is at the junction of 
the Norfolk Southern and the Weldon-Kinston Branch of 
the Atlantic Coast Line. It is on State highways 11, 43, 
and U. S. highway 264. 

The plant of the College, at present, consists of a cam- 
pus of approximately one hundred acres, on which there 
are twenty-two buildings appropriate to the work of the 
College. 

It is 86 miles east of Raleigh, on the Tar River, and 
65 miles, air line, from the Atlantic coast. 

HISTORY 

The General Assembly passed an Act authorizing the 
establishment of the College, March 8, 1907. 

Ground was broken for the first building July 2, 1908. 

The first regular session opened October 5, 1909. 

Only one-year and two-year curricula were offered. 

The first summer school was held May 24 to July 30, 
1910. 

The first class was graduated from the two-year nor- 
mal curriculum June 6, 1911. 

The College was authorized to offer a four-year cur- 
riculum and to grant the Bachelor of Arts degree No- 
vember 20, 1920. 

The first degrees were conferred August, 1922. 

The College was authorized to grant the Master of Arts 
degree August 22, 1929. 

The first Master of Arts degree was conferred in 
August, 1933. 

The College was authorized to offer a curriculum lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science degree May 29, 1941. 



General Information 21 

ENROLLMENT 

October 5, 1909, the College opened its doors for stu- 
dents. Since that date students have been enrolled in 

residence as follows: Net 

Regular Names Enroll- 

School Year Summer Total Counted Twice merit 

1909-10 174 330 504 42 462 

1910-11 227 300 527 29 498 

1911-12 235 359 594 26 568 

1912-13 252 322 574 20 554 

1913-14 251 328 579 19 560 

1914-15 295 394 689 16 673 

1915-16 295 398 693 20 673 

1916-17 307 353 660 15 645 

1917-18 325 273 598 12 586 

1918-19 278 286 564 20 544 

1919-20 285 293 578 31 547 

1920-21 381 302 683 34 649 

1921-22 317 352 669 34 635 

1922-23 395 436 831 48 783 

1923-24 516 490 1,006 59 947 

1924-25 593 680 1,273 59 1,214 

1925-26 709 710 1,419 134 1,285 

1926-27 736 712 1,448 109 1,339 

1927-28 767 712 1,479 98 1,381 

1928-29 976 540 1,516 199 1,317 

1929-30 952 496 1,448 164 1,284 

1930-31 984 461 1,445 171 1,274 

1931-32 972 473 1,445 147 1,298 

1932-33 970 361 1,331 194 1,137 

1933-34 1,013 484 1,497 180 1,317 

1934-35 1,096 733 1,829 244 1,585 

1935-36 1,134 733 1,867 202 1,665 

1936-37 1,142 625 1,767 170 1,597 

1937-38 1,204 700 1,904 138 1,766 

1938-39 1,269 781 2,050 224 1,826 

1939-40 1,289 663 1,952 198 1,754 

1940-41 1,296 648 1,944 228 1,716 

1941-42 1,339 519 1,858 267 1,591 

1942-43 1,064 493 1,557 280 1,277 

1943-44 980 457 1,437 259 1,178 

1944-45 953 406 1,359 243 1,116 

1945-46 1,049 393 1,442 258 1,184 

1946-47 ...1,382 567 1,949 344 1,605 

The sum of the annual enrollments since the College 
first opened its door is 42,073. 



22 East Carolina Teachers College 



The number of A.B 


. graduates by calendar 


years is: 




1922 






2 


1934 




... Ill 


1923 






5 


1935 




... 110 


1924 






7 


1936 




... 143 


1925 






19 


1937 




... 169 


1926 






28 


1938 




... 226 


1927 






38 


1939 




... 253 


1928 






54 


1940 




... 325 


1929 






82 


1941 




... 290 


1930 






97 


1942 




... 229 


1931 






88 


1943 




... 201 


1932 






116 


1944 




... 162 


1933 






123 


1945 

1946 




125 
123 


The number of B.S. 


graduates by calendar years: 




1941 






1 


1942 




... 29 


1943 






24 


1944 




... 25 


1945 






23 


1946 




... 27 


M.A. gradi 


aates in 


1946 






5 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

June 6, 1946 to June 2, 1947 

Men Women Total 

Freshmen 477 113 590 

Sophomores 99 257 357 

Juniors 30 193 223 

Seniors 41 245 285 

Unclassified 7 21 28 

Special 7 10 17 

Graduate 35 70 105 



Totals 696 909 1605 



General Information 23 

GROSS ENROLLMENT BY QUARTERS 

Summer 1946 Men 

First term 107 

Second term 97 

Fall 1946 536 

Winter 1947 551 

Spring 1947 539 

Different Students 

regular year 660 722 1382 

Different Students 

summer 1946 127 770 567 

Attended summer '46 and regular year 344 



Women 


Total 


400 


507 


222 


319 


686 


1222 


630 


1181 


579 


1118 



Enrollment in Campus Training School — Elementary 539 

Enrollment in City Training School — Secondary 563 

OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE 

By legislative enactment East Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege was established to make available "to young white 
men and women such education and training as shall fit 
and qualify them to teach in the public schools of North 
Carolina." Interpreting this to meet the demands of 
modern society upon the teacher the staff believes that 
each student accepted for registration should be given an 
opportunity to develop optimally as a person, citizen and 
teacher. To this end it is expected that before he is recom- 
mended for certification each prospective teacher shall 
have attained the following major competencies: 

1. A sufficiently comprehensive acquaintance with and 
appreciation of the cultural heritage and the vast 
body of knowledge which need to be mediated to the 
young to enable them to live more effectively. 

2. Desirable personal traits such as emotional stability, 
sincerity of purpose, love for children, initiative, de- 
pendability, tolerance, social adaptability, and effec- 
tive habits of work. 

3. An adequate understanding of the nature and nur- 
ture of children: of the physical, mental, social, and 
emotional development of youth through the years 



24 East Carolina Teachers College 

of formal schooling; of the way their interests and 
attitudes shift during the process of maturation (to- 
gether with the implications for teaching). 

4. Knowledge of the principles of learning and the 
techniques of teaching, together with demonstrated 
skill in the art of guiding the educational experi- 
ences of children. 

5. Reasonable mastery of the materials of instruction 
in the field of his particular interest. 

6. An understanding of the responsibilities, opportuni- 
ties and ideals of the teaching profession together 
with a knowledge of desirable personnel relation- 
ships in the school and community. 

7. A functional philosophy of education and life. 

DISCIPLINE 

In conducting a college for young men and women who 
are about to assume the responsibilities of so serious and 
dignified a profession as teaching, there should be no 
occasion for arbitrary and iron-clad rules. Each student 
should attend promptly and faithfully to every duty and 
have due consideration and regard for the rights and 
privileges of others. 

No rules are made by the College authorities except 
those necessary to govern routine work, but if the pupil 
is found to be falling behind in his studies, neglecting 
his duties or exerting an unwholesome influence, prompt 
steps are taken for his amendment. If a pupil does not 
show a disposition to conform to high standards of con- 
duct he is not considered a good prospective teacher; and 
if he is found unresponsive to instruction and counsel he 
is requested to withdraw from the College. The student 
is given the maximum of freedom commensurate with 
the orderly administration of such an educational institu- 
tion as this. He is given every encouragement and ample 
opportunity to develop self-direction in modern coopera- 
tive society. 



General Information 25 

In the spirit of the institution is found the discipline 
of the College. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

To promote a sense of personal responsibility in the 
students of the College a Student Government Associa- 
tion has been inaugurated, subject to the approval of the 
president of the College and of an advisory board. This 
organization adopts such regulations as concern the en- 
tire student body. The association has so administered 
its duties as to merit the approval of both faculty and 
students. 

HEALTH 

There is a central heating and lighting plant that pro- 
vides steam heat and electric lights for all the buildings. 
All those things necessary for sanitary conditions are of 
the best type procurable. The College gets its water from 
the City of Greenville. The city owns its waterworks 
and has the water examined frequently, thus insuring 
its purity. In short, the college life of each student is 
made as comfortable as can be, and every possible pre- 
caution for health is taken. 

The health conditions in the College from the first 
have been entirely satisfactory. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The college physician maintains an office in the in- 
firmary. Regular clinics are held twice daily under the 
supervision of the physician, and medical services are 
available at all times on call by the infirmary supervisor. 
All students living in the dormitories and all day stu- 
dents who subscribe to the infirmary services by pay- 
ment of the medical fee are admitted to the clinics and 
to the infirmary wards at the discretion of the physician. 
Two resident nurses are in charge of the infirmary. A 
well-equipped building adequately meets the needs of 
student health. 



26 East Carolina Teachers College 

Every student, following admission, is given a thor- 
ough physical examination. Satisfactory evidence of suc- 
cessful smallpox vaccination is required of all students. 
It is expected that in so far as is possible corrective 
measures will be taken for the defects found. 

The infirmary supplies many common drugs without 
charge to the student and such services as the staff may 
render are without charge. Additional services (consul- 
tations, special nurses, operations, special drugs) recom- 
mended by the attending physician and approved by the 
student's parents or guardian must be paid for by the 
student. 

STUDENT'S OUTFIT 

Each student living in a college dormitory is expected 
to bring for her own use the following articles: Two 
pairs of single sheets, one pair of blankets, two counter- 
panes, two pillowcases, six towels, covers for dresser and 
table, a spoon, and a glass. 

Only single beds are used. 

Note: The College laundry stamps each student's wash 
with a personal mark for identification. 

BUILDINGS 

Administration Building. This building was con- 
structed in 1929-30, and is given over entirely to admin- 
istrative offices. It contains the offices of the President, 
the Dean, the Treasurer, the Registrar, and of the Place- 
ment Bureau. 

Education Building. The building formerly occupied 
by the Science Department is now known as the Educa- 
tion Building and is occupied entirely by the Department 
of Education. 

Austin Building. The Austin Building is the former 
Administration and Classroom Building. It contains 
thirty classrooms, the stationery room, the book room, 
teachers' offices, music rooms, the offices of the Alumni 



General Information 27 

Association, and an auditorium where chapel exercises 
and other general assemblies of students are held. 

Robert H. Wright Building. The Robert H. Wright 
Building was named in honor of the first President of 
the College, who held the office for twenty-five years, 
and sponsored its construction. It contains a main audi- 
torium, music rooms, and rooms for the physical educa- 
tion department. 

Classroom Building. The Classroom Building is one 
of the most beautiful buildings on the campus. It houses 
the departments of Commerce, Geography, Home Eco- 
nomics, Science and Industrial Arts. This building is en- 
tirely modern in its architecture, arrangement of rooms, 
offices and equipment. 

Home Management House. Prior to 1936 a portion 
of Jarvis Hall was used for practice purposes for the 
course in home management. In 1936, on the completion 
of the new infirmary, the building formerly occupied as 
an infirmary was converted into a home management 
house and has since been used for that purpose. It con- 
tains ten rooms, which allows separate rooms for a group 
of seniors and an instructor, as well as ample space for 
entertaining. It also contains an apartment where a 
smaller group lives on a lower income level. The units of 
work on each level are run simultaneously. 

Laboratory School. The College has a well-equipped 
school building on the campus for practice teaching pur- 
poses in the elementary grades. This school has an en- 
rollment of over 443. For practice teaching in high school 
subjects, the College has a cooperative arrangement with 
the Greenville High School. This school has an enroll- 
ment of about 570. 

The Library. The Library, located on Wright Circle, 
was erected in 1924. It is a fireproof building and is used 
entirely for library purposes. The reading rooms will 
accommodate 250 readers and the stack room has capacity 



28 East Carolina Teachers College 

for 80,000 volumes. The book collection numbers more 
than 58,000 volumes at present and is being added to at 
the rate of around 3,500 a year. More than 300 maga- 
zines and newspapers are received. Instruction in the 
use of the Library is given all freshmen and the students 
are encouraged to take advantage of its facilities. Courses 
in Library Science are offered for teacher-librarians. 

Dormitories. The College is equipped with dormitory 
space to accommodate 838 students in four dormitories 
for students as follows : 

Wilson Hall 190 Men 

Jarvis Hall 171 Women 

Fleming Hall 191 Women 

Cotton Hall 286 Women 

Each dormitory room is provided with two single iron 
beds with springs, mattress and pillows, two chairs, a 
table, a lavatory, a bureau, a wardrobe — all the neces- 
sary furniture for comfortable living. 

Ragsdale Hall. Ragsdale Hall is a dormitory fully 
equipped for the accommodation of women members of 
the faculty and other women employees of the College. 
Its equipment is similar to that of the dormitories for 
students. 

Faculty Residences. On the campus are four resi- 
dences which are rented to members of the faculty. 

Infirmary. The College Infirmary is a two-story 
fireproof building located centrally on the campus. It is 
provided with 50 beds, and is adequately equipped to 
meet the needs of the student body. It is given class A 
rating by the American Medical Association. 

Dining Hall. The dining hall is one of the most at- 
tractive buildings of the institution. The equipment in 
the kitchen is modern in every sense. For the preserva- 
tion of meats, vegetables, and other foodstuffs, the Col- 
lege has a refrigerating plant of the best type. The dining 



General Information 29 

hall is under the direction of a trained dietitian and each 
menu is made out with much care — the object being to 
provide for the student body the most wholesome food 
and to see that this food is prepared in the best way- 
possible. 

College Post Office. The College post office is lo- 
cated in a wing of the dining hall. Students, faculty, and 
officers of the College may secure post office boxes for 
convenience in getting their mail. Regular mail deliveries 
from the downtown office are received at least twice a 
day and outgoing mail is taken up at the same time. 

The Laundry and Power Plant. The laundry and 
the power plant are under the same roof. The equipment 
here, as in the other buildings, is of the best possible 
type. The laundry has all the necessary equipment for 
efficient laundry work. 

The power plant supplies sufficient power for heating 
and lighting the College and for refrigeration. There are 
two sets of units, so that if one is out of commission the 
other may be used, thus preventing inconvenience, as 
well as saving wear and tear on machinery. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

At least four regular bulletins are published by the 
College each year. The regular bulletins are the annual 
catalog, the summer school bulletin, and two others that 
deal with some phase of teacher training. Recent bulle- 
tins have dealt with Student Activities, Prognostic Value 
of High School Grades, Recent Studies by Faculty and 
Advanced Students, and the Alumni Association. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Teco Echo, the college paper, is published twice a 
month by the students. It carries the usual college and 
alumni news, and is designed to furnish an outlet to stu- 
dent expression on all matters pertaining to their educa- 
tional development. 



30 



East Carolina Teachers College 



The Tecoan is the college annual. It is published by the 
students at the close of each regular school year. 

Pieces O' Eight, a quarterly magazine, is devoted to 
fiction, humor, and general student activities. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

It is the policy of the College to encourage campus or- 
ganizations that have for their purpose the building of 
character, personality and scholarship. The following is 
a list of such organizations: 



Association for Childhood 

Education 
Beta Kappa Chapter of 

Pi Omega Pi 
Chi Pi Players (Dramatics) 
College Band 
College Chorus 
College Orchestra 
Commerce Club 
Emerson Society 
English Club 
French Club (Phi Sigma) 
Home Economics Club 
International Relations Club 
Jarvis Forensic Club 
Lanier Society 
Mathematics Club 



Phi Sigma Chapter of the 

Sigma Pi Alpha 
Poe Society 
Robert H. Wright Chapter of 

the Future Teachers of 

America 
Science Club 
The Alumni Daughters and 

Sons 
Varsity Club 
Verse Speaking Choir 
Veterans' Club 

Women's Athletic Association 
Women's Chorus 
Young Men's Christian 

Association 
Young Women's Christian 

Association 



The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian 
Associations 

The religious interests of the College are centered in 
the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tions. The Young Women's Association was organized 
in 1909 and the Young Men's in 1939; since that time 
both of the organizations have done very effective work 
in promoting high ideals among the students. Regular 
devotional meetings are held to which all members of 
the student body and the members of the faculty are 
invited. 



General Information 31 

The organizations have their own building for re- 
ligious and social activities; and they sponsor a reading 
room where students may come at their pleasure to read 
or study. 

Each year these associations send delegates to the 
Southern Student Conference held at Blue Ridge, North 
Carolina, where methods for bettering the coming year's 
work are studied. 

These associations render efficient aid in meeting new 
students and in the organization of the College at the 
opening of the fall quarter. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

On June 5, 1912, by the classes of 1911 and 1912, the 
Alumni Association of the College was organized, formu- 
lating as its purposes — "to develop a spirit of coopera- 
tion among its members, to increase a spirit of loyalty to 
its Alma Mater, and to promote the general welfare of 
the institution." A regular meeting of the Association is 
held on Alumni Day of each commencement. 

Alumni headquarters — one large room on the main 
floor of the Austin Building partitioned to include an 
office, a filing room, and a reception room — was provided 
and furnished by the Administration in February 1940; 
and then also a general full-time secretary for the Asso- 
ciation was employed by the cooperation of the Associa- 
tion and the College. 

Since its organization the Association has made sev- 
eral gifts to the College, among which are the memorials 
— the Kate R. Beckwith Gateway; the Austin Loan Fund; 
the Wilson Memorial; and a contribution to the Robert H. 
Wright Loan Fund. In June 1940, the Association for the 
first time presented a symbolic alumni award to a gradu- 
ate in recognition of achievement. The first recipient was 
Miss Pattie Dowell, who was the first registrant and the 
first graduate of the College and who has achieved much 
in the field of teaching. By action of the executive board 
of the Association a symbolic award is to be presented 
annually. 



32 East Carolina Teachers College 

ATHLETICS 

Physical education, recreation and athletic facilities 
are provided for both men and women students. The 
Student Athletic Association sponsors both intramural 
and intercollegiate athletics. Intercollegiate athletic con- 
tests in football, basketball, baseball, tennis and boxing 
are scheduled for the men students. While athletics for 
men are relatively new in the College the men's teams 
have made gratifying progress during the past few 
years. Field hockey, soccer, volleyball, basketball, soft- 
ball and tennis clubs have been organized by the women 
students and contests are scheduled with outside insti- 
tutions in many of these sports through play day pro- 
grams. 

To be eligible for participation in intercollegiate ath- 
letics a student must meet the minimum residence re- 
quirements of the College in credit courses carried a 
quarter. Twelve quarter hours a quarter is the minimum 
requirement. 

The intramural sports program is being enlarged in 
scope each year to make "Sports for All" a reality. The 
intramural program for men includes the following 
sports: touch football, basketball, volleyball, tennis, 
archery, badminton, horseshoes, table tennis, Softball 
and track and field athletics. The following activities are 
on the intramural sports calendar for women: field 
hockey, soccer, hiking, tennis, archery, basketball, soft- 
ball, track and field athletics, volleyball, badminton, 
table tennis, paddle tennis, shuffleboard, deck tennis and 
bicycling. 

FIELD SERVICES 

Throughout the years East Carolina Teachers College 
has rendered services of various kinds to the State of 
North Carolina, and the people of the State have re- 
ceived these services with open arms. The College is now 
dedicating itself anew and with increased vigor to the 
ideal of service. In fact, it is committed to the principle 



General Information 33 

that the only reason for the existence of the College is to 
serve the people of the State. 

Beginning with the 1947-48 school year the College, 
through a Department of Field Services, is trying to serve 
the schools and the teachers of North Carolina in every 
way possible. To this end the College is prepared to do 
a limited amount of work in extension courses in the 
field, to follow up its own graduates in their teaching 
assignments, and to render other types of advisory help 
to the schools in every way possible. In addition to the 
services in the field, this department is prepared to organ- 
ize and to hold educational meetings and conferences on 
the campus, as well as to offer late afternoon, evening, 
and Saturday classes of an undergraduate and graduate 
nature for teachers in service. School boards, school 
superintendents, principals, supervisors and teachers are 
invited to contact the Department of Field Services for 
any help that this department is in a position to render. 



HI. EXPENSES 

Day Students 

The fee for day students, i.e., those not living in one of 
the college dormitories, is $43.00 a quarter of twelve 
weeks. 

Dormitory Students 

The fee for dormitory students is $141.00 a quarter. 
This fee covers tuition, instruction, minimum for meals 
in the cafeteria, room, laundry, admission to college 
entertainments, subscription to the college paper, and 
infirmary service for minor illness. 

Reservation Fee 

A reservation fee of $5.00 must accompany the appli- 
cation for admission from all students. The fee is cred- 
ited to the student's account, provided he enrolls in the 
quarter for which reservation is made. If he wishes to 
withdraw his application and notifies the College in 
writing at least two weeks before the opening of the 
quarter, the fee will be returned, except that no refund 
of a fall quarter fee will be made if requested after 
September tenth. 

FEES PAYABLE EACH QUARTER 

Dormitory Day 

Students Students 

Registration, etc $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 25.00 25.00 

Board (Minimum) 70.00 

Room Rent (Except Wilson Hall) 20.00 

Laundry 8.00 

$133.00 $ 35.00 
Student Activity Fee 8.00 8.00 

Total $141.00 $ 43.00 

Wilson Hall (Additional Room Rent).. 3.00 



36 East Carolina Teachers College 

Other Fees 

Non-residents of N. C. (a quarter) $35.00 

Private music lessons (a quarter) 15.00 

Laboratory fees in certain subjects 2.00 

Student teaching 10.00 

Diploma fee (with application for graduation) 5.00 

Late registration 1.00 

Changes in schedule (a subject) 25 

Transcript (after first) 1.00 

"Auditor" in one or more courses 6.00 

Infirmary fee** 1.00 

Use of piano or music instrument for individual 

instruction, a quarter 1.00 

Special students, i.e., day students who schedule not 
more than eight credit hours a quarter, will pay a fee of 
$3.00 a credit hour scheduled. 

These fees are subject to revision by the Board of 
Trustees of the College, and it reserves the right to re- 
vise them at any time it is found necessary or advisable 
to do so. 

To be exempt from the out-of-state fee: 

1. The parents or guardian of a student must be resi- 
dents of the State at the time of his registration, or 

2. The student must have established residence in the 
State at least six months before he entered the 
College. 

A resident student is construed to be one who actually 
lives in the State and not one who has merely moved into 
the State for the purpose of securing an education from 
one of the State Institutions. 



* This fee admits students to music concerts and lecture programs and pays member- 
ship or participation in the Student Government, the student newspaper, the annual, 
athletics, etc. 

* * Charged day students not living in own homes. Gives infirmary service. 



Expenses 37 

TEXTBOOKS 

Students are required to purchase their textbooks. 
For their convenience the College will maintain a deposi- 
tory where all necessary books may be purchased. 

WITHDRAWALS, REFUNDS, CREDITS 

Students who, for any reason, withdraw from the Col- 
lege before the end of any quarter will have a propor- 
tionate part of the amount paid for board refunded. In 
addition, if a student withdraws before registration for 
the quarter is closed, one-half of the fees for room and 
tuition will also be refunded. Refund will be calculated 
from the date of official withdrawal from the College. 

A student desiring to withdraw from the College should 
do so with the consent of his parent or guardian and the 
approval of the Registrar. Students who withdraw un- 
officially are not eligible to re-enroll in the College. 

Credit. — No degree, diploma, or certificate will be 
granted or a transcript of credits furnished a student 
until all financial obligations to the College, other than 
student loans, have been paid. 

All previously incurred expenses and accounts at the 
College must be fully paid or secured before a student 
may re-enter at the beginning of any quarter. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

Since the founding of the College in 1909, graduating 
classes, alumni, organizations, and individual friends of 
the College have contributed toward loan funds for 
worthy students. 

The first gift toward a loan fund was made by the 
Class of 1911, the first class to be graduated from the 
College. For more than a decade, each succeeding class 
made a liberal contribution toward that fund which was 
called the "Students Loan Fund." The Class of 1922 
named their gift the "Wilson Loan Fund." The alumni 



38 East Carolina Teachers College 

established the "Beckwith Loan Fund" and the "Austin 
Loan Fund." 

During the year 1946 the Alumni Association estab- 
lished a loan fund of $1,200.00 in honor of Miss Sallie 
Joyner Davis, Miss Maria D. Graham, Miss Mamie E. 
Jenkins and Miss Kate W. Lewis all of whom were mem- 
bers of the first College faculty. 

Other donors of loan funds together with present val- 
ues of those loans are listed below : 

A. B. Andrews Loan Fund $ 8,834.68 

Beckwith Loan Fund 655.55 

Kiwanis Loan Fund 210.76 

Pitt County Loan Fund 2,975.16 

Masonic Theatre Loan Fund 456.38 

Wilson Loan Fund 1,966.27 

St. Bernard Loan Fund 1,549.58 

Students Loan Fund 3,203.48 

Knights Templar and Royal Arch Masons Loan Fund 1,631.28 

Abbott Loan Fund 3,279.95 

Robert H. Wright Loan Fund 6,881.58 

Austin Loan Fund 750.15 

Alumni Loan Fund 1,200.00 

Reserve 495.80 

Total $34,090.62 

The Addie Fulford Rodman Memorial Loan Fund, 
donated by Colonel W. B. Rodman in memory of his wife, 
yields approximately $400 a year. This fund is in the 
custody of the State Department of Public Instruction. 

Application for Loans 

Applications will be considered by the Loan Fund Com- 
mittee of the College when made by students on blanks 
furnished by the Treasurer. The funds are limited in 
amount and are loaned to students only for use in their 
junior and senior years and on the surety of two ap- 
proved signatures. Application should be made at least 
two weeks before the beginning of the quarter for which 
the loan is desired. 



Expenses 39 

No student may borrow more than the actual college 
expenses for any one quarter, and no student may bor- 
row a total of more than $250.00 during his college career 

Scholarship and student government records are con- 
sidered in the awarding of loans. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Andrews Scholarship. An endowed scholarship 
valued at $100.00 annually, and known as the Andrews 
Scholarship, has been given by Mr. A. B. Andrews in 
memory of his wife, Helen Sharpies Andrews. 

U. D. C. Scholarships, (a) The Samuel S. Nash 
Scholarship, $130.00 annually, is given by the Thirteenth 
District of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

(b) The Gen. James Johnston Pettigrew Scholarship, 
$130.00 annually, is given by the North Carolina Division 
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

c. The James Fenly Spear, Jr., Memorial Award is an 
annual award of $50.00 given by Mrs. Nell C. Spear in 
memory of her son, James Fenly Spear, Jr., a former 
student of East Carolina Teachers College, who lost his 
life while serving his country in World War II. 

The recipient of this award is chosen by the Science 
faculty on the basis of scholarship, citizenship and lead- 
ership, from Science majors of senior standing. 

d. The John B. Christenbury Memorial Trophy is 
awarded annually to a young man student of East Caro- 
lina Teachers College who is a member of an athletic 
team during his senior year, and who is selected by a 
faculty committee on the basis of scholarship, character, 
and service to the College. The trophy will be kept at 
the College and have the winner's name engraved on it 
each year. 

e. The Thomas C. Williams Memorial Scholarship 
award is a ten dollar award presented annually at Com- 
mencement by Beta Kappa Chapter of Pi Omega Pi, the 
national honorary business education fraternity. It is 



40 East Carolina Teachers College 

awarded to the senior business education major with the 
highest scholastic average in four years of business educa- 
tion at East Carolina Teachers College. It is named in 
honor of a former member of the chapter. 

A number of working scholarships are available for 
students doing graduate work. 

Application for these should be made to the chairman 
of the committee on Graduate Instruction. 

GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE 

The two literary societies and the various graduating 
classes have left a large number of donations to the Col- 
lege. Among these gifts are oil portraits of the four men 
most closely associated with the establishment of the 
College, money with which to buy plants and shrubbery 
for the campus, books for the library, funds for interior 
decoration, and curtains for the stage. 



IV. ADMISSION 

Application for admission to East Carolina Teachers 
College must be made on a form provided by the College. 
It must be approved by the Registrar before the student 
is permitted to enroll. The application for admission 
must be accompanied by the reservation fee of $5.00. 
The reservation fee becomes a registration fee if the 
student presents himself at the College for registration, 
and it is not then refundable. 

No student will be admitted until records proving his 
eligibility have been presented. 

To be admitted to any curriculum a student must be 
sixteen years of age. 

The dates for registration in the different quarters of 
the college year are given in the calendar which appears 
in each annual catalog. 

No student will be given, under any condition, a per- 
mit to register in any quarter later than two weeks after 
the regular date for his registration. Registration is not 
complete until .all required registration forms have been 
filled out properly and filed with the Registrar. These 
forms must be returned to the Registrar within twenty- 
four hours after the student has received his permit to 
register. No registration forms will be accepted by the 
Registrar after one day has elapsed following the close 
of the registration period of two weeks. 

Registration is not complete until all fees for the quar- 
ter have been paid or arrangements made with the Treas- 
urer for paying them, and required forms on file in the 
Registrar's office. 

Admission From High School 

Students who have not attended another college may 
be admitted to East Carolina Teachers College under any 
one of the following conditions : 

1. The satisfactory completion of a four-year course in 
an approved secondary school, with sixteen units of 
credit. 



42 East Carolina Teachers College 

2. The equivalent of such a course as shown by pass- 
ing the college entrance examination. 

3. Graduation from a four-year non-standard classi- 
fied high school, and passing the State Senior High 
School examination (for admission to college), with six- 
teen units of credit. 

4. Evidence of having satisfactorily completed a stand- 
ard secondary course in an accredited private or de- 
nominational school. 

The major portion of the secondary school course ac- 
cepted for admission should be definitely correlated with 
the curriculum to which the student is admitted. 

A foreign language is not required for admission. 

All students entering from high school who have less 
than an average grade of "3" on transcripts will be re- 
quired to take a battery of tests for guidance purposes. 
Entering students who make low scores on these tests 
may be required, by their major adviser, to take certain 
courses without credit as a basis for further work in such 
fields as English, science, mathematics and social studies. 

PRESCRIBED UNITS FOR ADMISSION 

1. English 4 units 

Grammar and composition — one or two units. 
American literature — one unit. 
English literature — one unit. 

2. Mathematics IY2 units 

Algebra — at least one unit. 

One unit in arithmetic is recommended for 

those majoring in elementary school 

teaching. 
One unit in geometry is recommended for 

those majoring in high school teaching. 

3. Social Science 2 units 

American history — one unit. 
Additional history, civics or geography, 
one unit. 



Admission 43 

4. Biology and Physical Science 2 units 

At least x k unit in each of two fields se- 
lected from biology, general science, 
chemistry, physics. 

5. Elective 6V2 units 

Not more than three vocational units (in all) will be 
accepted from home economics, manual training, agri- 
culture, commercial subjects including shorthand, type- 
writing, bookkeeping, etc. 

Mathematics majors must present 2 units of algebra 
and one unit of plane geometry. 

Applicants not meeting these requirements, and gradu- 
ates of non-standard high schools may be admitted by 
special examination. The examination is general and 
covers the usual secondary school material in English, 
mathematics, history, and science. 

Admission From Another College 

To be admitted on a transcript from another college, 
a student must have passed more than 50 % of the credit 
hours of work carried during the last session in such 
college and be eligible for readmission to that college. 
If his grade average on transcript is less than "3" or "C" 
he will be required to take a battery of tests and make 
satisfactory scores on them as one condition of admission. 

Applicants for admission here for the first time are 
urged to have their credentials in the hands of the Regis- 
trar of the College several weeks prior to registration 
day. An official record of high school work must be pre- 
sented as well as an official transcript of all college work 
done. Honorable dismissal from the last college attended 
is required. These credentials must be approved by the 
Registrar before the student is permitted to register and 
attend classes. 

The grade point-credit ratio of transfer students will 
be considered "1" or average for all credit hours ac- 



44 East Carolina Teachers College 

cepted toward the completion of the student's curricu- 
lum. 

No credit will be given for courses that carry the 
lowest passing grade when submitted on transcript from 
another college. 

EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE 

A student is not allowed, except by special permission 
from his adviser, and then only when he is carrying less 
than the maximum amount of work, either to begin or to 
continue correspondence or extension courses while tak- 
ing work in residence at East Carolina Teachers College. 

Moreover, a student enrolled for correspondence or 
extension work with another college must notify his ad- 
viser when he is taking such courses. Students are held 
individually responsible for any violation of this regu- 
lation. 

Not more than fifteen per cent of the total hours re- 
quired for the completion of any curriculum shall be 
earned through correspondence or extension study, or 
both. 

Correspondence and extension courses will not be ac- 
credited toward the Master's degree. 

FRESHMAN REGISTRATION 

In order to facilitate the process of adjustment which 
the beginning student must pass through, the College has 
set up at the beginning of the fall quarter a "Freshman 
Registration" program for all students who are entering 
here for the first time. The events of this program in- 
clude preregistration counseling, special lectures in stu- 
dent traditions and college regulations, tours of the Col- 
lege plant, social features in the student organizations of 
the College and making up the student's program of 
studies for the quarter. This program begins with a meet- 
ing of the entire freshman class in the Wright Auditorium, 
at 9:30 A.M., on the first day of "Freshman Week." All 



Admission 45 

students entering the College for the first time are re- 
quired to be present at all appointments comprising the 
freshman registration program. 

SUMMER QUARTER 

It is the aim of the College to render every service it 
may to advance the best interests of public education in 
our State. Realizing that many teachers wish to study 
after their schools close, that they may better equip 
themselves for their profession; also realizing that all 
the schools of the counties do not close at the same time, 
the College, to meet these conditions, will admit students 
at the beginning of any regular quarter, and in addition 
to this it conducts a summer quarter. 

The summer quarter is equivalent in all respects to 
any other quarter in the college year. Credits completed 
in the summer quarter count toward graduation. 

If there is sufficient demand for any of the courses 
offered in this catalog, the course is given. See summer 
school bulletin for information in detail. 



V. TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

For Teachers In The Elementary Schools 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in 
the elementary schools, the records from the institution 
in which the applicant received his training must show 
that he has reached a satisfactory state of proficiency in 
spelling and penmanship. The certification will be made 
by the institution and will appear on the record. 

Grammar and primary certificates, class A, require of 
candidates, who do not hold a lower grade certificate, 
graduation from a standard four-year college. 

Health and Physical Education for Elementary and 
High School Teachers 

As of July 1, 1942, the following will constitute the 
requirements in Health and Physical Education for ele- 
mentary teachers and for teachers of those subjects in 
the high school: 

Elementary Teachers 

1. Principles of Health and Physical Education 2 S.H. 

2. Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for 
Elementary Schools 2 S.H. 

3. Practices and Procedures in Health for Elementary 

Schools 2 S.H. 

(Two semester hours of Biological Science are recommended 
as a prerequisite). 

Part-time Teacher of Physical and Health Education 

and Coaches of Athletic Teams 15 S.H. 

This shall include: 

1. Principles, organization, administration, and super- 
vision of Physical Education and Health 3-4 S.H. 

2. Physical Education skills and applied techniques 1 .. ..8-9 S.H. 

a. Group games of low organization (games adaptable 
to adult groups and to children of elementary age.) 

b. Dual and single games (tennis, handball, golf, bad- 
minton, track, and field events, etc.). 

1 Required service courses, in health and physical education are not acceptable for 
credit towards certification in these fields. 



48 East Carolina Teachers College 

c. Group games of high organization (football, soc- 
cer, rugby, basketball, baseball, volleyball, speed 
ball, lacrosse, field hockey, etc.). 

d. Rhythms and dances. 

e. Gymnastics and stunts. 

f . Aquatics. 

3. Health Education, including the teaching of health 

and school health problems 30 S.H. 

Full-time Teacher of Health and Physical Education in 

the Junior and Senior High School 30 S.H. 

This shall include :* 

1. Human anatomy and physiology 6 S.H. 

2. Principles, Organization, Administration, Supervi- 
sion of Physical Education and Health Education.. ..3-4 S.H. 

3. Physical Education skills and applied techniques 1 .... 12 S.H. 

a. Group games of low organization (games adaptable 
to adult groups and to children of elementary age). 

b. Dual and single games (tennis, handball, golf, 
badminton, track, and field events, etc.). 

c. Group games of high organization (football, soc- 
cer, rugby, basketball, baseball, volleyball, speed 
ball, lacrosse, field hockey, etc.). 

d. Rhythms and dances. 

e. Gymnastics and stunts. 

f. Aquatics. 

4. Individual corrective physical education 2-3 S.H. 

5. Health Education: 

a. Methods and Materials in Health Education. If 
Methods and Materials are used toward fulfilling 
the general education requirements, the additional 
work in the field of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion must be taken to fulfill major requirements. .2-3 S.H. 

b. Hygiene, including personal health, public health, 
child hygiene, and sanitation, immunology, and 
allied subjects 3-4 S.H. 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 3 

These certificates will be issued on the basis of tran- 
scripts of college records which show that a required 

1 Required service courses, in health and physical education are not acceptable for 
credit towards certification in these fields. 

2 6-8 semester hours of biology and physical sciences and 6-8 semester hours of social 
sciences recommended as prerequisites. 

3 These requirements for high school teachers' certificates continue in effect until 
July 1. 1950. 



Teachers Certificate 



49 



amount of professional credit and specialized work on 
major subjects has been earned. Graduation from col- 
lege is required. 

Each applicant should meet the requirement in two or 
more teaching fields. Subjects for which certification is 
granted will appear on the certificate. 

The professional requirements on all high school teach- 
ers' certificates shall be 18 semester hours (27 quarter 
hours) as follows: 

1. Educational Psychology 2 sem. hrs. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching 



or 



Problems in Secondary Education 2 sem. hrs. 

Materials and Methods 2 sem. hrs. 

Observation and Directed Teaching 3 sem. hrs. 

Electives in Education 9 sem. hrs. 



The minimum subject matter requirements for the 
teaching of any subject shall be: 



Semester 
Hours 

English 24 

Mathematics 15 

Physical Education 30 

Fine Arts 30 

Industrial Arts 30 

French 18 

This is based on two units 
of high school French, other- 
wise 24 semester hours is re- 
quired. 
Social Science 30 

a. American History 6 

b. European History 6 

c. From Government, 
Geography, Eco- 
nomics or Sociology.... 9 

d. Electives (from a, b, 

c) 9 



Semester 

Hours 

Science* 30 

This shall include: Biology, 
Chemistry, Physics and Geog- 
raphy or Geology. 
Commerce 30 

This shall include Stenogra- 
phy, Bookkeeping, Typewrit- 
ing, and Office Management. 
Public School Music 30 

Credit for three semester 
hours in Voice must be in- 
cluded. 
Home Economics 51 

a. Chemistry 6 

b. Biology 6 

c. Physics 2 

d. Art 3 



* A certificate will be issued in any one of the Sciences in which an applicant pre- 
sents a minimum of 12 semester hours college credit. 



50 



East Carolina Teachers College 



Semester 
Hours 
Individual certification will be 
granted in any of the specific 
areas, history, government, 
geography, economics and so- 
ciology, in which 12 semester 
hours credit is presented. Cer- 
tification for Citizenship or 
Civics or Problems in Ameri- 
can Democracy would require 
credit for at least 18 semester 
hours from government, eco- 
nomics, and sociology. 
Latin 24 

Based on two units of high 
school Latin, to be reduced 6 
semester hours for each addi- 
tional unit of entrance credit. 



Semester 
Hours 

e. Foods 8 

f. Clothing ;. 8 

g. Management 6 

Home management ± 
Residence required (6 
weeks recommended 

as a minimum). Other 
courses may include 
buying, furnishing 
and housing. 

h. Family 6 

Child Development 
(required) . 

Family Relationships 
(required) . 

Other courses may 
include Health, Nurs- 
ing and Hygiene. 

i. Social Science 6 



Librarians 

Whole-time librarians as of 1941 must hold a degree 
from a standard four-year college, have met professional 
requirements not less than those for the Class A Teach- 
er's Certificate and shall have earned at least twenty- 
four semester hours of credit in Library Science taken 
in an accredited library school. This work shall include 
administration, cataloging and classification, reference, 
children's and adolescent literature. 

Teacher-librarians, that is, teachers who give a portion 
of their time to library work, shall have earned a degree 
in a standard four-year college, met professional require- 
ments for the Class A Teacher's Certificate, and earned 
at least twelve semester hours in Library Science. This 
work shall include administration, reference, children's 
and adolescent literature. 



Teachers Certificate 51 

Requirements for Principal's Certificate, Effective 
As Of July 1, 1943 

A. Hold or be qualified to hold the Class A Teacher's Cer- 
tificate (secondary or elementary). 

B. Have three years' teaching experience within the past 
five years. 

C. Hold a Master's degree from an institution of higher 
learning with recognized graduate standards approved 
by the State Department of Public Instruction. 

D. Have credit for a minimum of 18 quarter hours (27 
recommended) of graduate work in Education selected 
from the following areas: 

1. Fundamental Bases of Education. 

a. The Curriculum, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

b. Human Growth and Development. 

c. Social Foundations of Education. 

2. Instructional and Supervisory Techniques. 

a. Principles of Supervision, at least 3 quarter hours 

required, 
b: Teaching Procedures. 

c. Guidance and Pupil Personnel and Accounting. 

d. Measurements. 

3. Organization and Administration. 

a. High School Administration, at least 3 quarter 
hours required. 

b. Elementary School Administration, at least 3 
quarter hours required. 

c. General Administration. 

d. School Plant. 

e. Staff Personnel. 

f . Community Relations. 

E. Electives 18-27 quarter hours 

This elective credit may be of the candidate's choice, 
subject to such requirements as the institution may have 
for the Master's degree, but it should be designed pri- 
marily to add to one's equipment as a teacher. 



52 East Carolina Teachers College 

Requirements for Superintendent's Certificate, 
Effective As Of July 1, 1943 

A. Hold or be qualified to hold the Class A Teacher's 
Certificate (secondary or elementary). 

B. Have five years' experience within the past ten years, 
with at least two years as principal of an elementary 
or secondary school of seven or more teachers, duriing 
which time the applicant held or was qualified to hold 
a Principal's Certificate under requirements set up. 

C. Hold a Master's degree from an institution of higher 
learning with recognized graduate standards ap- 
proved by the State Department of Public Instruction. 

D. Have credit for 27 quarter hours of graduate work in 
Education selected from the following areas: 

1. Fundamental Bases of Education. 

a. The Curriculum, at least 3 quarter hours re- 
quired. 

b. Human Growth and Development. 

c. Social Foundations of Education. 

2. Instructional and Supervisory Techniques. 

a. Principles of Supervision, at least 3 quarter hours 
required. 

b. Teaching Procedures. 

c. Guidance and Pupil Personnel and Accounting. 

d. Measurements. 

3. Organization and Administration. 

a. General Administration, at least 3 quarter hours 
required. 

b. School Finance, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

c. School Plant. 

d. Staff Personnel. 

e. Community Relations. 

E. Electives 18 quarter hours 

These elective credits may be in Education, or in a field 
of the candidate's choice, subject to such requirements 



Teachers Certificate 53 

as the institution may have for the Master's degree. It 
is recommended, however, that if the applicant does not 
already have such an understanding, either through his 
undergraduate work, or through 1, 2 and 3 above, the 
electives afford an opportunity to secure a general under- 
standing of the relation of the school to social and political 
institutions of the community. 

Requirements for Graduate Secondary and Graduate 

Elementary Certificates, Effective As Of 

July 1, 1941 

I. Graduate Secondary Certificates: 

A. Hold or be qualified to hold the Class A High School 
teacher's Certificate. 

B. Have three or more years' teaching experience. 

C. Have a Master's degree from an institution of higher 
learning with recognized graduate standards approved 
by the State Department of Public Instruction. This 
would include: 

1. Subject matter in the certificate fields 18 q.h. 

2. Education (philosophy, principles, 

curriculum, psychology, etc.) 9 q.h. 

3. Electives 18 q.h. 

II. Graduate Elementary Certificate: 

A. Hold or be qualified to hold the Class A primary or gram- 
mar grade teacher's certificate. 

B. Have three or more years' teaching experience. 

C. Have a Master's degree from an institution of higher 
learning with recognized graduate standards approved 
by the State Department of Public Instruction. This 
credit would include: 

1. Academic work 9-18 q.h. 

This should include subject matter in those fields in 
which there are manifest weaknesses in the equip- 
ment of the individual, as well as subject matter that 
would strengthen points already strong. 

2. Education (Philosophy, principles, 

curriculum, psychology, etc.) 9 q.h. 

3. Electives 18-27 q.h. 



54 East Carolina Teachers College 

STUDENT-TEACHING AND PLACEMENT SERVICE 

Student-teaching is recognized generally as the cul- 
minating aspect of one's professional preparation for 
teaching. Adequate facilities for the administration and 
supervision of this phase of the student's work are pro- 
vided at East Carolina Teachers College. The campus 
elementary school, the Greenville High School and sev- 
eral high schools in the service area of the College are 
utilized. 

Each student who is working toward the A.B. degree 
is required to do at least ninety clock hours of student- 
teaching under the supervision of competent staff mem- 
bers. Before admission to student-teaching the student 
must have attained classification as a senior in the Col- 
lege and have met all departmental prerequisites. Also 
he must have accumulated at least as many quality points 
as he has quarter hours of credit and have a general 
average of not less than "3" in each field of major prepar- 
ation at the time application for student-teaching is made. 
Moreover, a student will not be admitted to student- 
teaching until he has completed at least two full quarters 
of work at East Carolina Teachers College. 

Applications for admission to student-teaching must be 
made to the Director of Student-teaching and Placement 
not later than the registration period of the quarter pre- 
ceding the one in which the student-teaching is to be 
done. 

Extra-mural teaching* will be permitted for credit only 
in cases where local facilities are inadequate and then 
only when the supervisory staff of the College makes all 
the arrangements with school officials. Ordinarily, extra- 
mural assignments will be made only in the cases of out- 
standing students who have completed at least half of the 
student-teaching requirement in Greenville. 

Students who are preparing for certification in the pri- 
mary and grammar grades complete the student-teaching 



* Student-teaching outside Greenville. 



Teachers Certificate 55 

requirement during a single quarter, during which they 
spend the entire day in the campus school. Students who 
are preparing for certification in secondary fields may 
elect to do half of their student-teaching in each of two 
quarters, in which cases they are required to spend a half- 
day only at the high school. 

Enrollment in the student-teaching courses is com- 
pleted only when the student-teacher has registered in 
the office of Student-teaching and Placement. Placement 
service is available gratis to all** graduates of East Caro- 
lina Teachers College and graduates of other institutions 
who have completed (or have in progress) at least 15 
quarter hours of course work in this institution. 

All requests "by employing officials are referred to the 
office of Student-teaching and Placement. Therefore it is 
imperative that registration in this office be completed 
promptly if a registrant expects prompt and effective 
service. 



* * Graduates with the B.S. degree are especially urged to register. 



VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students working toward the completion of a definite 
curriculum in East Carolina Teachers College will be 
registered with a definite classification, as Freshman 
Primary, Senior Grammar Grade, etc. Those taking a 
full schedule of studies for purposes other than gradua- 
tion in this College will be listed as "Unclassified." Stu- 
dents taking a limited schedule of study (not more than 
eight hours) will be classified as special students. Stu- 
dents having fewer than 43 quarter hours of credit are 
classified as Freshmen; those with 43 to 91 quarter hours 
are classified as Sophomores; those with 92 to 138 quar- 
ter hours are classified as Juniors; and those with 139 
quarter hours or more are classified as Seniors. 

CREDIT 

The College operates on the quarter plan. The fall, 
winter, spring, and summer quarters are each approxi- 
mately twelve weeks in length. The College is in ses- 
sion six days a week. Most classes meet three days a 
week. A quarter hour of credit is earned by one recita- 
tion period a week for one quarter; three quarter hours 
of credit are earned in a class that meets three times a 
week for a quarter, etc. 

Seniors electing courses numbered below 100 will be 
allowed no more than two-thirds of the credit such 
courses carry. 

Credit will not be allowed on courses taken which sub- 
stantially duplicate courses already completed. 

CLASS ABSENCE REGULATIONS 

Regularity of class attendance is expected of all stu- 
dents. Every class absence incurs the loss of some educa- 
tional value to the student and places an added responsi- 
bility on both the student and the instructor. Absences 



58 East Carolina Teachers College 

in considerable numbers may lead to a lowering of scho- 
lastic standards. 

Students are charged with absence from classes missed 
because of late enrollment. 

(1) A student may be permitted no more than two un- 
excused absences in a course during a quarter. 

(2) Additional absences may be approved on applica- 
tion of the student to the Absence Committee of the fac- 
ulty. Only illness of the student, serious illness in his 
immediate family, representation of the College in a rec- 
ognized activity, or like important matter will be inter- 
preted as an emergency justifying such additional class 
absence. Unexcused absences on the day before or the 
day after a regular or special holiday will count as "dou- 
ble cuts." 

(3) A student shall not receive credit for a course in 
which the unexcused absences exceed two or the total 
number of class absences equals 25 per cent of the num- 
ber of class meetings of that course during the quarter 
except that juniors, seniors, and graduate students who 
have a grade average of "2" on all previous college work 
and who have a satisfactory student government record 
may have 4 unexcused class absences on courses that 
carry three hours credit or more. 

These regulations shall be administered by a commit- 
tee of three members of the faculty to be appointed by 
the President of the College. 

It is understood that all work missed due to class ab- 
sence shall be made up to the satisfaction of the in- 
structor. 

In case of emergency-absence under regulation (2) 
the student will fill out an APPLICATION FOR EMER- 
GENCY-ABSENCE form, secure the signature of the in- 
structor or instructors concerned, and return the form 
to the Registrar for consideration by the Absence Com- 
mittee. 

The Absence Committee will determine whether a stu- 
dent is eligible for more than two unexcused absences. 



Academic Regulations 59 

GRADES AND SCHOLARSHIP 

A grade-point system is used to calculate all student 
scholarship standings. The grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and c 
are used by this College; 1 is the highest grade given, 4 
is the lowest passing grade, and 5 is a failing grade. A 
grade of c indicates a condition on the course because 
the student has not completed the quantitative require- 
ments of the course. No additional class work shall be 
required to complete the course. 

In quantitative values the grade 1 earns 3 grade points 
a quarter hour on the course; the grade 2 earns two grade 
points a quarter hour; and the grade 3 earns 1 grade point 
a quarter hour. No grade points are given for a grade 
of 4, and one grade point is deducted from the student's 
total for each credit hour failed. 

When a student fails to maintain the minimum quality 
of scholarship indicated below, he shall be ineligible to 
re-register in the College: 

At the end of the first year (3 quarters) — 35 quarter 
hours of credit and 30 grade points, 

at the end of the second year (6 quarters) — 75 quarter 
hours of credit and 75 grade points, 

at the end of the third year (9 quarters) — 120 quarter 
hours of credit and 120 grade points. 

After the sophomore year a student shall have at all 
times at least as many grade points as he has credit 
hours as one condition of re-enrollment in the College. 

Exceptions to this regulation may be made only by 
the Committee on Classification and Credit on the writ- 
ten recommendation of the adviser of the student con- 
cerned and of the teachers under whom grades below 
average were made during his last quarter. If exception 
is made, the student may re-enroll only on probation and 
exception shall be made only once for the same student. 
The grade point-credit ratio of transfer students will be 
considered "1" or average for all credit hours accepted 
toward the completion of the student's curriculum. 



60 East Carolina Teachers College 

No credit will be given for courses that carry the low- 
est passing grade when submitted on transcript from an- 
other college. 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING STUDENTS' 
PROGRAM 

All regular students are required to schedule at least 
12 credit hours a quarter. 

Courses may be dropped within the first four weeks of 
the quarter provided such changes are approved by the 
teacher whose courses are concerned, by the student's 
adviser, and by the Registrar. If a course is pursued for 
four or more weeks after registration and then dropped 
that course will be reported as failed and so counted in 
arranging the program of work for the next quarter. 

The standard student load is sixteen hours a quarter. 
In order to facilitate making schedules, students may 
carry seventeen hours. Students who average "2" or bet- 
ter may carry eighteen hours the following quarter. Stu- 
dents who fail one or more courses, the credit value of 
which totals three quarter hours, or more, shall carry no 
more than thirteen quarter hours the following quarter. 
All regular students must schedule a minimum of twelve 
hours a quarter. 

A student cannot enter courses later than the begin- 
ning of the third week of the quarter and get credit for 
such courses. 

A student may drop courses from his program and 
take other courses instead, provided such changes are 
made before the beginning of the third week of the quar- 
ter and provided also that such changes are approved 
by the teachers whose courses are concerned, by the stu- 
dent's adviser, and by the Registrar. A charge of twenty- 
five cents will be made for each subject added or dropped 
from the schedule at the student's option. 

A full-time student who fails to pass nine credit hours 
in any quarter will be required to take a battery of tests 



Academic Regulations 61 

and make satisfactory scores on them before he will be 
readmitted to the College. 

A full-time student who fails a second time to pass nine 
credit hours in any quarter will be denied readmission to 
the College. 

A part-time student, i.e., one having a schedule of less 
than nine credit hours, who fails on any part of his sched- 
uled courses, will be readmitted to the College only after 
taking the battery of tests, mentioned above and making 
satisfactory scores on them. 

A special student, having a schedule of fewer than nine 
hours, must receive a passing mark on each subject 
scheduled in order to be eligible for readmission to the 
next succeeding quarter of the College. 

A substitution for a required course shall be another 
course in the same department. 

Credit will not be given on the requirements for the 
Bachelor's degree for courses in the major field that are 
taken by correspondence or extension. 

A student is not permitted to elect courses whose num- 
bers are more than one classification removed from the 
student's own classification. This rule also applies in the 
matter of retaking courses to raise grades. 

Elective courses in any curriculum are decided upon 
jointly by the student and his major adviser. 

The student's major adviser has authority on all curri- 
cula matters except minor requirements which are di- 
rected by the minor adviser. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Any student who receives a degree from East Carolina 
Teachers College must have done as much as one year 
(36 weeks) in residence study in this College. The three 
quarters need not be consecutive, but the last quarter of 
resident study previous to graduation must be done in 
this College. He must also meet the curricula require- 
ments of the catalog under which he enters or of some 



62 East Carolina Teachers College 

subsequent catalog, provided that no student will be 
permitted to graduate under a catalog issued more than 
seven years prior to the date of his graduation. 

No person pursuing a teacher-training curriculum will 
be graduated from the College who has not fully met all 
the requirements laid down by the State Department of 
Certification for the Teacher's Certificate to which his 
curriculum specifically leads. 

In order to graduate, a student shall have earned at 
least as many grade points as he has quarter hours of 
credit on courses used for graduation, and shall have a 
general grade average of "3" or better on courses taken in 
each major field and in each minor field of study. Grades 
made on courses taken by correspondence, by extension, 
and in summer schools other than East Carolina Teachers 
College shall not be considered. 

Before receiving a degree from the College or transfer- 
ring credit to another college a student must satisfy com- 
pletely the requirements of regular participation in activi- 
ties courses in Physical Education. 

When a student changes from one curriculum to an- 
other he shall notify the Registrar in writing, stating the 
major he is dropping and the one he is taking up. This 
change must be made prior to the senior year. 

A student who changes from one curriculum to another 
will be required to complete fully all of the required core 
of the curriculum from which he is to be graduated. 

Presence at graduating exercises is required, except 
when permission for graduation in absentia has been 
granted by the Registrar. A written request for such a 
permission must be made at least ten days before com- 
mencement. 

Application for graduation must be made on a blank 
provided by the College not later than registration day 
of the last quarter the student is enrolled in the College. 
The diploma fee of $5.00 must accompany the applica- 
tion. 



Academic Regulations 63 

Before a student is granted a diploma he is required to 
pass a test in spelling. Students majoring in primary 
and grammar grade work must also pass a proficiency 
test in handwriting. To pass the spelling requirement the 
student must make a score equal to or better than the 
eighth grade norm on each of two standard spelling 
tests. To pass the handwriting requirements the student 
must equal or better the quality score of seventy on the 
Ayer's handwriting scale. Passing scores in these tests 
constitute a prerequisite to practice teaching. These tests 
will be offered and students will be required to take 
them during the first year in residence. Names of those 
passing the tests will be reported to the Registrar's office 
on the form regularly used to report class grades. 

Upperclassmen whose written work is so poor as to 
lack clearness and accuracy may be reported by their 
teachers to the Committee on Standards in Written Com- 
position and assigned to the English Department for 
remedial work until their advisers and the Committee 
are satisfied that they no longer need help. 



VII. CURRICULA 

In order to carry out the aims of the College the fol- 
lowing regular curricula of instruction have been ar- 
ranged and are offered: 

(a) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. De- 
gree, for those who expect to become Primary 
Teachers 

(b) A Four-Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. De- 
gree, for those who expect to become Grammar 
Grade Teachers. 

(c) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. De- 
gree, for those who expect to become High School 
Teachers. 

(d) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the B.S. De- 
gree. 

(e) Graduate work leading to the M.A. Degree in the 
fields of School Administration and Elementary 
Education, and in the following high school sub- 
jects: Business Education, English, Geography, 
History, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. 

In addition to the above curricula, provision is being 
made for the preparation of nursery school — kindergar- 
ten teachers. Beginning with the Fall Quarter 1947, work 
will be offered for students who are interested in this 
type of work. A curriculum for the preparation of nurs- 
ery school — kindergarten teachers, will appear in a later 
bulletin. 

CURRICULA REQUIREMENTS 
A. B. Degree 
A. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in the Primary 
Grades 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Col- 
lege when a student has received 190 quarter hours credit 
and has met the following requirements for teaching in 
the primary grades: 

1. 51 Professional Credits: 

Education 1, 200, 206, 207, 208, 308, 318, 

322, 339, 341-2-3 credit: 39 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 201, 205, 308 credit: 12 q.h. 



66 



East Carolina Teachers College 



2. 



3. 



121 General Education Credits: 

Art Education 15e, 102, 221, 301 credit: 12 q.h. 

Economics 104 credit: 3 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 119, 213, 222 credit: 24 q.h. 

Geography 10, 110, 330 credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Health and Physical Educ. 1, 105, 244, 

245, 3 hrs. elective credit: 15 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 205 credit: 21 q.h. 

Mathematics 42, 156, 212 credit: 9 q.h. 

Music Education 10, 102, 202, 308 credit: 13 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 

Sociology credit: 3 

18 Free Elective Credits credit: 18 q.h. 



q.h. 
q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 



B. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in the Gram- 
mar Grades. 



1. 42 Professional Credits: 
Education 1, 248, 318, 322, 339, 

344-5-6-7 credit: 

Psychology 103, 201, 204, 205, 308 credit: 

2. 133 General Education Credits: 

Art Education 15e, 104, 301 credit: 

Economics 104 credit: 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 119, 213, 

222, 234, 313 credit: 

Geography 10, 160, 221, 230 credit: 

Government 1 credit: 

Health and Physical Education 1, 105, 

244, 245, and an elective in 

Physical Education credit: 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 205 credit: 

Mathematics 42, 136, 156, 210 credit: 

Music Education 10, 203, 306 credit: 

Science 23, 24, 25, 172, 173 credit: 

Sociology elective credit: 

3. Free Electives credit: 



27 q.h. 
15 q.h. 



9 q.h. 

3 q.h. 

30 qJL 

12 q.h. 

3 q.h. 



15 q.h. 

21 q.h. 

12 q.h. 

10 q.h. 

15 q.h. 

3 q.h. 

15 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 



Currirula Requirements 67 

C. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in the High 
School 
The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Col- 
lege when the student has received a minimum of 190 
quarter hours credit and has met the following require- 
ments: 

1. 36 Professional Credits: 
Education 1*, 223M, 223m, 318, 

324M, 325 credit: 27 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

2. 66 General Education Credits:** 
Arts (From Art, Music, or Industrial 

Arts) credit: 9 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, and 9 hours elective from 

the following: 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 119, 

206, 218, 222. ' * credit: 18 q.h. 

Health r, 105.X...™^.^fr^r. credit: 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 54, 156, or 6 hours elective 

from courses listed for Mathematics 

Majors credit: 6 q.h. 

Science 171, 172, 173, or laboratory 

sequence courses credit: 9 q.h. 

Social Studies: 

History 10, 11, 12 credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Geography 10 credit: 3 q.h. 

Sociology 100, or a course in Regional 

or Physical Geography credit: 3 q.h. 

3. Electives: To be decided upon jointly by the student and 
his major adviser. A student must complete the require- 
ments of one major field and one minor field. One major 
field or one minor field must be selected from the follow- 
ing: English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science 
and Social Studies. 

4. Major and Minor Credits 

Requirements in the Major Field 

a. Business Education — 1, 2, 3, 10, 114, 115, 116, 130, 
131, 132, 214, 215, 218, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 341. 



* Home Economics 7 will replace Education 1 for Home Economics Majors. 
* * "Appropriate credit in General Education may count in the total and specific credit 
required in the subject fields." (See Requirements in Major and Minor Fields.) 



68 East Carolina Teachers College 

b. English— 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 112c, 119 or 218, 
206, 213, 216, 222, 314 or 315, 325, 326 or 327, and 6 
hours from 219, 225, 319, 330. 

c. Foreign Language— French 11 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 
125, 207, 208, 225, 313, 314, 320, 325 and 3 additional 
hours, or Spanish 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 125, 207, 

208, 225, 313, 314, 320, 325, and 3 additional hours. 

d. Health and Physical Education — 

Men: Health Education 225, 317, 365. Physical Edu- 
cation 5, 13, 14, 17, 21, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107, 114, 127, 
210, 211, 213, 302, 306; Science 23, 24, 25, 106, 107, 
231. 

Women: Health Education 225, 317, 365. Physical 
Education 5, 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, 23, 24, 41, 104, 105, 
107, 111, 112, 127, 210, 212, 302, 306. Science 23, 24, 
25, 106, 107, 231. 

e. Home Economics — 2, 8, 9, 105, 110, 117, 126, 127, 215, 
219, 224, 225, 226, 227, 230, 231 319. Sociology 305. 
(With Social Studies as Minor — Home Economics 2, 
8, 9, 105, 110, 117, 126, 127, 215, 219, 224, 225, 226, 227, 
230, 319; Science 23, 24, 44, 45, 46, 116, 207, 231, 
309, 310; Sociology 305.) 

f. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 213, 214, 
215, 232, 233, 323, and 6 elective hours. 

g. Music — 11a, b, c, 106, 107, 108, 110a, b, c, 205, 6 hours 
in piano, 6 hours in voice or instrument, and 9 hours in 
instruments. 

h. Science— 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46, 125, 126, 127, 4 addi- 
tional hours in biological science; Geography 125, and 
14 elective hours from the following: Science 111, 
112, 120, 121, 122, 130, 131, 132, 140, 206, 207, 208, 

209, 220, 225, 226, 227, 231, 309, 310, 316, 317, 330. 
i. Social Studies — 

Economics 101; Government 1, 102; History 10, 11, 
12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 208, 209, 221, 325, 326, and 9 
hours in senior History courses. 

or 
Economics 101, 102, 103, 302; Government 1, 102, 
202, 302; History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115; Sociology 
100, 202, 306, 320. 

or 
Economics 101; Geography 10, 110, 112, 113, 210, 310, 
315; Government 1, 102, 302; History 10, 11, 12, 113, 
114, 115; Sociology 100. 



Currirula Requirements 69 

Requirements in the Minor Field 

a. Business Education — (Same as Major Requirements) 

b. English— 1, 2, 3, 111, 112a, 112b, 112c, 213, 216, 222, 

325, and 12 hours from 110, 119, 206, 218, 314, 315, 

326, 327, 330. 

c. Foreign Language — French IT, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 
125, 225, 320, 325, and 6 additional hours, or Spanish 
11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 125, 225, 320, 325, and 6 addi- 
tional hours. 

d. Health and Physical Education — 

Men: Health Education 225 and 317. Physical Educa- 
tion 13, 14, 17, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107, 114, 127, 211, 213, 
302; and 4 additional hours. Science 23, 24, 25, 106, 
107, 231. 

Women: Health Education 225, 317. Physical Educa- 
tion 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, 23, 41, 104, 105, 107, 111, 112, 
127, 212, 302; and 4 additional hours. Science 23, 24, 
25, 106, 107, 231. 

e. Library Science— 210, 211, 218, 220, 222, 231, 232, 
301 and 302. English 207, 313. Education 308. 

f. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 232, 323, 
and 9 elective hours. 

g. Music — 11a, b, c, 106, 107, 108, 110a, b, c, 205, 6 hours 
in piano, 6 hours in voice or instrument, and 9 hours 
in instruments. 

h. Science— 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46, 125, 126, 127; Geog- 
raphy 125, and 9 elective hours from the group of 
electives offered in Science Majors. 
(With Home Economics as Major) 

Science 23, 24, 44, 45, 46, 115, 116, 117, 207, 231, 309, 
310; Geography 125. 

i. Social Studies — 

Economics 101, 102; Government 1, 102, 302; History 
10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, and 9 hours in senior courses 
in History; Sociology 100. 

D. Requirements for the B. S. Degree. 

Candidates for the B.S. degree must meet the following 
requirements: 

The number of required credits in quarter hours for a 
major shall not be less than 45 nor more than 54. The 
credit hours required of each student, within the above 
limits, and the subjects to be taken by each student in 



70 East Carolina Teachers College 

the major department shall be determined solely by the 
director of that department. 

The number of required credits in quarter hours for a 
minor shall not be less than 36 nor more than 45. The 
credit hours required of each student, within the above 
limits, and the subjects to be taken by each student in 
the minor department shall be determined solely by the 
director of that department. 

Courses offered by the Department of Education and 
Psychology, except Psychology 103, will not be credited, 
either as required or as elective courses, toward the re- 
quirements for the B.S. degree. Also courses designated 
as methods, student teaching, teaching apprenticeship; 
or courses designated for Grammar Grade and Primary 
majors only will not be credited toward the requirements 
for the B.S. Degree. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred by the 
College when the student has received a minimum of 190 
quarter hours credit, and has met the following require- 
ments: 

1. 87 or 90 General Education Credits: 
Arts (from Art, Industrial Art, 

or Music) credit: 9 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, and three 

sophomore survey courses credit: 18 q.h. 

Foreign Language credit: 9 q.h. 

Geography 10 and one course in 

Regional Geography credit: 6 q.h. 

Health 1, Physical Education 

6 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 54, 156, or six hours elected 
from courses listed for Mathematics 

majors credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103 credit: 3 q.h. 

Science — sequence courses in Chemistry, 

Biology, or Physics credit: 9 q.h. 

Social Studies credit: 18 or 21* q.h. 

Economics 101 
Government 1 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115, 116 
Sociology 100 
Note: These courses must be completed in the Freshman and 
Sophomore years, unless major or minor requirements provide 
other subjects in these departments. 



Currirula Requirements 71 

2. Electives: To be decided upon jointly by the student and 
his major adviser. Any major adviser may specify in 
these general elective credits additional courses not to 
exceed 12 quarter hours, but such additional credit shall 
not be in the major field. (See Requirements in the Major 
Field.) A student must complete the requirements in one 
major field and one minor field. 

3. Major and Minor Credits 

Requirements in the Major Field 

a. Art— 15, 116, 118, 119, 120, 218, 220a, 220b, or 220c, 
224, 225, 300, 304. (English 218; Home Economics 
126, 215; Industrial Art 140; Music 306.) 

b. Business Education — 

Accounting— 1, 2, 10, 108a-9, 130, 131, 132, 231, 232, 
233, 234, 235, 330, 333, 334, 340, 341, elective 6 hours. 

or 
Secretarial— 1, 2, 3, 10, 104, 106-7-8a-9, 114, 115, 116, 
214, 215, 218, 231, 232, 341, elective 12 hours. 

c. English— 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 112c, 119 or 218, 
213, 219, 222, 314 or 315, 319, 325, 326 or 327, and 3 
additional hours. (12 hours from the following: Art 
218; Business Education 231; Government 202; His- 
tory 218, 219, 317; Library Science 301; Sociology 
204.) 

d. Foreign Language — French 11, 12, 13, 104. 105, 106, 
125, 207, 208, 225 or 325, 313, 314, 320, and 6 addi- 
tional hours. (English 219, History 115, Government 
202 or 310, and the following in accordance with 
General Education requirements on page 70; Art 

218, Music 306, and Geography 112). 

or 
Spanish 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 125, 207, 208, 225 
or 325, 313, 314, 320 and 6 additional hours. (English 

219, History 317, Government 202 or 310, and the 
following in accordance with General Education re- 
quirements on page 70: Art 218, Music 306, and Geog- 
raphy 210.) 

e. Geography— 10, 11, 12, 110, 112, 113, 125, 210, 211, 
212, 215, 310, and 9 additional hours. 
(Economics 101, 105; History 208 or 209; Sociology 
100.) 



72 East Carolina Teachers College 

f. Health and Physical Education — 

Health Education — 225, 317; Physical Education — 13, 
14, 17, 21, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107, 114, 127, 210, 211, 213, 
302, and 7 additional hours. 
(Science 106, 107, 231.) 

g. Home Economics — 2, 8, 9, 105, 110, 117, 126, 127, 
215, 219, 224, 225, 226, 227, 230, 231, 319. (History 
205; Sociology 305; Art 120; Math 57); Prerequisites, 
(Science 23, 24, 44, 45, 46, 115, 207, 231, 309.) 

h. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 213, 214, 
215, and 15 additional hours. (12 elective hours from 
the following: Ind. Arts 11, 12; English 218, 222; Ge- 
ography 12; History 208, 209; Home Economics 117, 
226; Science 44, 45, 46, 125, 126, 127.) 

i. Music Education— lla.b.c, 106, 107, 108, HOa.b.c, 
205, 211a.b.c. Applied music major 9 hours, and ap- 
plied music minor 3 hours. 

j. Science — 44, 45, 46, (and 111, 112, 140 or 130, 131, 
132), 125, 126, 127, and 18 additional hours. (Mathe- 
matics 57, 60.) 

k. Social Studies— History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 
208, 209, 218, 219, 299, 325, 326, and 12 hours in senior 
History courses. (Geography 110, 210; English 218, 
222.) 

or 
Economics 101, 102, 103; Government 1, 201, 202; 
History 10, 11, 12; Sociology 100, 202, 203; and 18 
hours in senior courses in Economics, Government, 
History, or Sociology. (English 218, 222; Geography 
110, 210.) 

Requirements in the Minor Field 

a. Art— 15, 116, 119, 120, 218, 224, 225, and 10 addi- 
tional hours. 

b. Business Education — 

Accounting— 1, 2, 10, 108a-9, 130, 131, 132, 231, 232, 
233, 234, 235, 330. 

or 
Secretarial— 1, 2, 3, 10, 104, 106-7-8a-9, 114, 115, 116, 
214, 215, 218, 231. 

c. English— 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 112c, 213, 222, 
325, and 3 additional hours. 

d. Foreign Language — French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 
125, 225, 320, 325, and 6 additional hours; or Spanish 
11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 125, 225, 320, 325, and 6 
additional hours. 



Currirula Requirements 73 

e. Geography— 10, 11 or 125, 12, 110, 112, 113, 210, 211 
or 215, 212, 310, and 6 additional hours. 

f. Health and Physical Education — 

Health Education 225, 317; Physical Education 14, 17, 
21, 23, 105, 107, 210, and 22 additional hours. 

g. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, and 15 
additional hours. 

h. Music Education — lla.b.c, 106, 107, 108, HOa.b.c, 
205, 211a.b.c. Applied music major 9 hours, and ap- 
plied music minor 3 hours. 

i. Science— 44, 45, 46, (and 111, 112, 140 or 130, 131, 
132) 125, 126, 127. 

j. Social Studies— History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 
218, 219, 325, 326, and 12 hours in senior History 
courses. 

or 
Economics 101, 102, 103; Government 1, 202, 310; 
History 10, 11, 12; Sociology 100, 202, 203, and 9 
hours in senior courses in Social Studies. 

Social Case Work Assistant 

Students who wish to prepare to take the examination for 
social case work assistants should take the following: 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 218, 222 21 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102, 103, 302 12 q.h. 

Geography 10, 11, 160, 310 12 q.h. 

Government 1, 102, 202, 302, 305, 310 18 q.h. 

Health 1, 105, 225, 365 12 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 115, 116, 208, 209 21 q.h. 

Home Economics 105 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 54, 156 6 q.h. 

Physical Education 127, 134 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 201, 205, 270, 340 15 q.h. 

Science 231, 171, 172, 173, 330 16 q.h. 

Sociology 100, 101, 102, 202, 203, 204, 210, 

211, 305, 306, 308, 320 36 q.h. 

Electives 12 q.h. 



Total 190 q.h. 

If the above requirements are met a B.S. degree will be 
granted. 



74 East Carolina Teachers College 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

1. Purpose: The primary function of East Carolina 
Teachers College is to prepare teachers and school admin- 
istrators for all types of public-school work. As the state 
certification requirements for teachers and administra- 
tors advance, this College extends its curricula to prepare 
its students to meet the new requirements. Graduate 
instruction is intended to provide an advanced program 
of study for North Carolina teachers and school admin- 
istrators and to enable them to meet the requirements 
for the graduate certificates issued by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction. 

2. Administration. The administration and direction of 
graduate instruction is in charge of the Committee for 
the M.A. Degree. 

3. Admission to Graduate Instruction. Application for 
admission to graduate instruction must be made to the 
Chairman of the Committee for the M.A. Degree. Blanks 
for this purpose may be secured from his office. 

To be admitted to graduate instruction, an applicant 
must hold a Bachelor's Degree from this College or from 
some other institution of equal rank or lack not more 
than six quarter hours of work to complete the resident 
requirements for the Bachelor's Degree, provided he is 
recommended for graduate standing by the director of 
his major department. He must also have met the under- 
graduate requirements for his major and minor fields 
and made not less than an average grade of "3" in all 
his undergraduate work. 

If the undergraduate work of an applicant does not 
show the completion of at least fifteen quarter hours in 
English, nine of which shall be Composition, and twenty- 
four quarter hours in a combination of Education and 
Psychology, such deficiencies shall be made up before the 
Master's Degree will be conferred. 

Admission to graduate study is not equivalent to ad- 
mission to candidacy for the degree of Master of Arts. 



Currirula Requirements 75 

4. Transcripts. Graduates from other institutions must 
present an official transcript of all high school and col- 
lege work completed. This transcript should be filed with 
the Registrar of the College before the first enrollment. 

5. General Information. Each graduate student should 
choose a major field and consult the director of that de- 
partment with reference to the work to be done in that 
department. 

Courses numbered 300-399 followed by letter G indi- 
cate Senior-graduate courses. Courses numbered 400 or 
above followed by letter S indicate graduate level per- 
mitting Seniors. 

Courses numbered 400 or above are open to graduate 
students only. 

6. Marks. Credit is given for graduate instruction only 
for marks "1," "2," and "3." 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF ARTS 

1. Minimum Residence. A residence of at least one 
academic year, forty-five quarter hours, in on-campus 
work at East Carolina Teachers College is required. One 
year of residence work shall be understood to mean one 
academic year of full-time study or its equivalent done 
within five consecutive years, including one full-time, 
twelve quarter hours, quarter of on-campus residence. 

2. Admission to Candidacy. Each student must make 
application to the Chairman of the Committee for the 
M.A. degree, for admission to candidacy not later than 
the first week of the quarter or summer session at the 
close of which the degree is to be conferred. 

3. Not more than fifteen quarter hours of work may 
be taken in any one quarter. 

4. Not more than fifty per cent of the student's gradu- 
ate credit may be taken in Senior-graduate courses. 

5. Course Requirements. At least forty-five quarter 
hours of graduate work must be completed with no grade 



76 East Carolina Teachers College 

below a "3" and one-third of the grades above a "3." The 
work may be done under either of the following plans: 

a. Eighteen quarter hours in major field, nine quarter 
hours in Education or Psychology or in a combina- 
tion of both, six quarter hours of seminar, twelve 
quarter hours of electives, and a thesis. The electives 
shall be selected with the advice of the director of 
the major department. 

b. Twenty-four quarter hours in major field, nine quar- 
ter hours in Education or Psychology or in a combi- 
nation of both, and twelve quarter hours of electives 
to be chosen with the advice of the director of the 
major department. 

6. Thesis. If a thesis is written it must show the re- 
sult of an investigation of some educational problem 
related to the major field. The subject of the thesis must 
be approved by the director of the major department and 
the Graduate Committee at least two quarters before the 
degree is conferred. The thesis must be approved by the 
director of the major department and by the Graduate 
Committee at least two weeks before the degree is con- 
ferred. One bound typewritten copy of the thesis must be 
filed with the librarian of the College and one copy must 
be filed with the director of the major department before 
the degree is conferred. 

No credit will be given for the seminar until after the 
thesis has been accepted. 

7. Teaching Ability. Each student must satisfy the 
Graduate Committee as to his ability to teach. This may 
be done in either of two ways: (a) successful teaching 
experience, or (b) successful student teaching. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES OFFERED 

Students desiring to enter certain professional fields 
other than education will be able to take at East Carolina 
Teachers College one to three years of work preparatory 



Currirula Requirements 77 

to entering colleges giving full curricula in those fields. 
The work indicated below is offered. 

Pre -medical: 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, and 111 15 q.h. 

French or German 9 q.h. 

Geography 10 and 125 6 q.h. 

Government 1 3 q.h. 

Health 1 and 105 6 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 60, and 110 9 q.h. 

Psychology 103 3 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 120, 121, 

122, 125, 126, 127, 207, and 208 61 q.h. 

Electives 14 q.h. 

Total 135 q.h. 

Pre-dental: 

English 1 2, 3, 110 and 111 or 112a and 112b 15 q.h. 

Geography 10 3 q.h. 

Government 1 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 57 and 60 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103 3 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 125, 

126, 127, 207, and 208 49 q.h. 

Sociology 100 3 q.h. 

Total 91 q.h. 

Laboratory Technician: 

English 1, 2, 3 9 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 60 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103 3 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 120, 

121, 122, 125, 126, 127, 207, 208 and 231 65 q.h. 

Total 92 q.h. 

Pre-nursing Curriculum: 

English 1 2, 3 9 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 9 q.h. 

Math 54, 60 6 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 44, 45, 46 21 q.h. 

Total 45 q.h. 



78 East Carolina Teachers College 

Pre-legal: 

Students who contemplate entering the legal profession 
should complete a four-year college course before entering 
law school. Therefore, it is recommended that all such 
students enroll for the B.S. degree with a major in Social 
Studies and a minor in English or a major in English and 
a minor in Social Studies. For those students who desire 
such a course, the following courses for the first two years 
of pre-legal work are suggested. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b 21 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102, 103 9 q.h. 

Geography 10, 11, 12, 110, 112 15 q.h. 

Government 1 3 q.h. 

Health Education 1 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116 21 q.h. 

Mathematics 54 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103 3 q.h. 

Science 171, 172, 173 9 q.h. 

Sociology 100, 101, 102 9 q.h. 

Total 96 q.h. 

Pre-engineering: 

Descriptive Geometry 3 q.h. 

Engineering Drawing 6 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3 9 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education 3 q.h. 

History, Economics, or Sociology 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59*, 60, 110, 121, 122 21 q.h. 

Science 44, 45, 46 12 q.h. 

Total 60 q.h. 

High School Admission Units: 

• English 4 units 

History 1 unit 

Algebra IV2 units 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Solid Geometry Vz unit 

Science 1 unit 

Electives 7 units 



* Solid geometry required either in high school or college. 



VIII. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Significance of course numbers: 

For freshmen 1 to 99, sophomores 100 to 199, juniors 200 to 
299, seniors 300 to 399, graduate students 400 to 499. 
The letter G following course numbers indicates Senior- 
Graduate courses. 

The letter S following course numbers indicates Gradu- 
ate-Senior courses. 

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

Mr. Oppelt, Mr. McGinnis 

318s. Classroom Organization and Control. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A seminar for student-teachers in high schools to be 
taken preferably during the quarter in which they do 
their student-teaching. 

Class discussion under the leadership of the director of 
student- teaching (in collaboration with the officials and 
supervising teachers of the high schools, and the college 
departmental supervisors of student-teaching) will be 
based largely on the observation and participation of 
student-teachers in the major instructional and non- 
instructional activities of high school teachers. In addi- 
tion, such topics as the following will be included: teacher 
personnel relationships, records and reports required by 
the State, etc. 

360G. Guidance in Public Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A basic course in the principles and practices of a guid- 
ance program. 

This course includes a discussion of the basic assumptions 
for guidance; the need and extent of guidance needs of 
pupils; the classroom teacher's responsibility in the total 
guidance program; fundamental guidance practices to be 
understood, such as the individual inventory, occupa- 
tional information, counselling, training opportunities, 
placement and follow-up. 

405. Elementary School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Among the topics to be discussed are the following: the 
qualifications of the principal; the purpose and scope of 



80 East Carolina Teachers College 

elementary education; grouping of children for whole- 
some development; pupil progress; the daily program; 
pupil personnel and adjustment services; the school li- 
brary; health of children; provision for exceptional chil- 
dren; the school office and the school plant. Required 
for the principal's certificate. 

406. The Elementary School Principal. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. This 
course includes such topics as the following: survey and 
analysis of the community; survey and analysis of the 
local school; beginning and closing the school year; the 
school office; school publicity; the role of the principal 
in social control; public relations of the principal. 

407. Public School Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. This 
course is designed to provide the student an opportunity 
to gain an over-view of the development of American 
educational finance and present trends. Some practical 
experience will be provided in budgeting school funds, 
auditing school accounts, making cost analyses and fi- 
nancial reports. 

408. Public School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Among the topics to be discussed in this course are the 
following: Administrative personnel and organization; 
administration of instructional employees; administration 
of the school plant; administration of school business 
affairs; administration of pupil personnel; administration 
of instructional materials. 

409. High School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Illustrative of the topics to be considered are the follow- 
ing: the development of the secondary school; aims of 
secondary education; organization and management of 
secondary schools; classroom control; supervision; the 
home room; the health program; extracurricular activi- 
ties; the school library; appraising and reporting pupil 
progress; present practices and trends in high school 
administration. 
This course is required for the principal's certificate. 



Courses of Instruction 81 

422. The Elementary School Curriculum. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is based on the following units: Understand- 
ing the elementary school child; guiding life in the school; 
organizing and presenting learning experiences by the 
unit approach; sources of materials; current practices and 
trends in teaching social science, the language arts, quan- 
titative thinking, science, health and creative arts; eval- 
uating changes in the child. 

Required for elementary school principals and recom- 
mended for elementary teachers and supervisors. 

424. The High School Curriculum. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Topics to be discussed are: the present status of secondary 
education; philosophy of secondary education; studying 
the adolescent as a basis for curriculum re-organization; 
types of secondary curricula; procedures in curriculum 
re-organization; present trends. Required for certifica- 
tion as high school principal or supervisor. 

428. Principles and Practices of Supervision. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The following topics will be included: an emerging con- 
cept of supervision; the principles of supervision; the 
administrative organization for supervision; planning 
supervisory programs; studying and improving the 
teaching-learning situation; evaluating supervision. 
Required for certification as a principal or supervisor. 

433. Staff Personnel Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes a discussion of such topics as: teacher 
supply and demand; recruiting and selecting teachers; 
in-service preparation of teachers; certification of teach- 
ers; introducing the new teacher to her work; married 
teachers; evaluating teacher effectiveness; teacher load; 
teachers' salaries; teacher turn-over; tenure; professional 
organizations; the health and recreation of teachers; pro- 
fessional ethics; the legal and social status of teachers. 

434. Home-school-community Relations. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Such topics as the following will be considered: the need 
for home-school-community relations; growth of com- 
munity interest in public education; influence of the 



82 East Carolina Teachers College 

community on public education; propaganda; financial 
support of public schools; school publicity; community 
organizations and the schools; problems and policies in 
public relations; suggested procedures in building a con- 
structive program. 

480. Interpretation and Use of Research Reports. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all master's degree candidates. The purpose 
of this course is to provide some training and experience 
in the field of educational research and in the more inten- 
sive specialization usually associated with it. (Same as 
Ed. 480.) 

ART 

Miss Lane, Miss Hudson 
ART EDUCATION 

102. Art Education in the Primary Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Manuscript writing, bookbinding, creative expression in 
a variety of media, and picture study. Required of ma- 
jors in primary education. 

104. Art Education in the Grammar Grades. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Skills and techniques in a variety of media. Children's 
needs, interests, and activities are studied as a funda- 
mental background for procedures. 
Required of majors in grammar grade education. 

221. Art Education in the Primary Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is a continuation of Art Education 102. 

Water colors, clay, finger paint are used. Craft problems 

for primary grades. 

Required of majors in primary education. 

301. Art in the Integrated Program. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

The underlying philosophy of art in the integrated school 
program. Techniques in school murals, block printing, 
stenciling and other activities are acquired through 



Courses of Instruction 83 

actual experience. Observation of the elementary art 
program in progress. Required of majors in primary and 
grammar grade education. 
Studio fee: $2.00. 

DESIGN 

15. Art Structure: Color and Design I. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: three or 
four quarter hours. 

A basic course in the field of design. Underlying prin- 
ciples of good design and color relationship are studied. 
Appreciation through observation and analysis, and ex- 
perience in creative problems. 

Required of majors in Art and in Home Economics. 
Studio fee, $2.00. 

15e. Art Structure: Color and Design I. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A basic course in the field of design. Underlying prin- 
ciples of good design are studied. Appreciation through 
observation and analysis. Experience in creative prob- 
lems, with emphasis directed to the needs of elementary 
teachers. 

Required of majors in primary and grammar grade edu- 
cation. 
Studio fee, $2.00. 

116. Art Structure: Color and Design II. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: four quarter 
hours. 

Continuation of Art 15 with emphasis on color. 
Opportunity for creative expression stressing the rela- 
tionship between material, function, and design. 
Required of majors in Art and Home Economics. 
Studio fee, $2.00. 

120. Design for Posters and Display Material. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: four quar- 
ter hours. 

The application of lettering, design and color principles 
to advertising, posters, and display materials. 
A study of typography and methods of reproduction in 
commercial art. 

Problems include labels, signs, illustrations, bookplates, 
cartoons and posters. 



84 East Carolina Teachers College 

208. Crafts. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Application of principles of design to various crafts. Clay, 
bookbinding, weaving, simple woodwork, metal and 
leather. 

224. Advanced Design. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Application of the elements of art structure to various 
fields of design. Opportunity is given for creative work 
in block-printing, stenciling and painting. Analysis of 
design in textiles, plastics and ceramics. 

240. Stage Design. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Color in stage design and lighting. Planning the set and 
making the stage model. 
Prerequisite: Art 116. 

303. Graphic Arts: The Book. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The graphic arts applied to book design. Creative prob- 
lems in typography, layout, illustration, end papers, selec- 
tion of binding and stamping, and planning of jackets. An 
opportunity will be given to examine the work of out- 
standing typographers and book designers. 

DRAWING AND PAINTING 

119. Drawing. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: four quar- 
ter hours. 

Fundamental principles of drawing and composition. 
Perspective studies, contour drawing, and pencil sketch- 
ing. Studio and outdoor problems. 

225. Painting. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: four quarter 

hours. 

A study of composition through line, value, color, texture, 

and space. 

226. Figure Drawing. 

Four hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Quick action sketches and finished renderings of the 



Courses of Instruction 85 

model, leading to the ability to draw the figure in posi- 
tions of rest or action, from the model and from mem- 
ory. Media: Charcoal, pencil, conte crayon and pastels. 

230. Free Expression. 

Spring quarter. Five hours a week. Credit: four quarter 
hours. 

This course provides opportunities for exploration and 
experimentation with various art media such as clay, 
water color, oil, charcoal, pastel, and pencil, as a basis 
of growth in creative self-expression. Basic principles 
of composition are studied in relation to design, elements 
of line, dark and light, form, color, and texture. 

300. Oil Painting. 

One lecture, six studio hours a week. Credit: four quar- 
ter hours. 

Still life, landscape and fundamentals of portraiture. 
Studio and outdoor problems. 
Prerequisite: Art 225 or 15. 

CERAMICS AND SCULPTURE 

304. Clay Modeling. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Principles of achieving form in the round and in relief. 

Modeling in clay with instructions in building armatures, 

and plaster casting. 

Studio fee, $2.00. 

306. Sculpture. 

One lecture, four studio hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Creative work in plastic design with the following media: 
terra cotta, plaster and wood. The making of piece molds. 
Studio fee, $2.00. 

307. Puppetry. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designing and making marionettes and puppets, creating 
the stage set, and producing a marionette play. 



86 East Carolina Teachers College 

ART HISTORY 

118. Art Survey: Architecture and Sculpture. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A survey of Egyptian, Greek, Early Christian and Byzan- 
tine, Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance architecture 
and sculpture. 

130. Pan-American Art. 

One hour per week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The art of Mexico, Central America and Peru, with 
emphasis on pre-Columbian art, the Spanish influence, 
and contemporary Mexican painting. 

218. Art Appreciation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A brief survey course in painting, sculpture, architecture, 
and the minor arts, and their influence on contemporary 
American art. 

220a. Art of the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The development of painting, sculpture, architecture and 
the minor arts through the eighteenth century. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

220b. Art of the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The development of painting, sculpture, architecture and 
the minor arts from the nineteenth century to 1910. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

220c. Art of the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The development of painting, sculpture, architecture and 
the minor arts from 1910 to the present time. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

^BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Mr. Browning, Mr. Cameron, Miss Dempsey, 
Miss Ellis, Miss Lowe 
1. Typewriting. 

Five laboratory hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 



Member of: National Association of Business Teacher-Training Institutions. 



Courses of Instruction 87 

A one-term course in touch typewriting for personal use. 
Drills are used to develop facility, accuracy, and the com- 
plete mastery of the keyboard in the shortest possible 
time. Instruction in letter writing, centering problems, 
and manuscript typing. A speed of twenty-five words a 
minute is required for credit in this course. 
Students who have had two years of typewriting in high 
school must have special permission in order to receive 
credit for this course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 

2. Typewriting. 

Four laboratory hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
A continuation of Business Education 1. Drills to improve 
accuracy and speed. Advanced letter writing and other 
business forms. 

A speed of thirty-five words a minute is required for 
credit in this course. 

Students who have had one year of high school type- 
writing may begin their college typewriting with this 
course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 

3. Typewriting. 

Four laboratory hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to teach the most advanced busi- 
ness forms and to develop the highest speed possible for 
each individual student. 

A speed of forty-five words a minute is required for credit 
in this course. 

Students who have had two years of typewriting in high 
school may begin their college typewriting with this 
course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 

10. Introduction to General Business Principles 
(formerly 110). 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

This course has been planned especially for students in 

other departments who want to elect a course in business 

education. 

The course also provides background materials for the 

study of other business subjects. 

Topics: The handling of business papers; introduction to 



88 East Carolina Teachers College 

office machines; the proper use of banking facilities; the 
handling of negotiable instruments; filing; problems of 
communication and travel such as the use of the tele- 
phone, telegraph service, postal service, express and 
freight services, passenger transportation services, and 
services to travelers. 

104. Advanced Typing Drill. 

Four laboratory hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Advanced drill practice which will aid the student in 
acquiring both accuracy and speed. A speed of fifty-five 
words a minute is required for credit in this course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 

106. Office Machines: Adding — Listing Machine. 

Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

Enrollment is limited to two students to each available 

machine. 

Business education majors are given preference. 

The student is required to do twenty lessons on either the 

full-keyboard machine or the ten-key machine. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

107. Office Machines: Crank-Driven Calculator. 

Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Enrollment is limited to the number of available ma- 
chines. Required of all business education majors who 
are candidates for the B.S. degree. Business education 
majors are given preference. 

Lesson 1 through 15 in the crank-driven calculator 
manual are required for credit in this course. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

108a.b.c. Office Machines: Key-Driven Calculator. 

Two laboratory hours a week each. Credit: one quarter 
hour each. 

Enrollment is limited to the number of available ma- 
chines. Business Education majors are given preference. 
Required of all business education majors who are candi- 
dates for the B.S. degree. Twenty lessons in the key- 
driven calculator manual are required for credit in each 
course. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00, charged only in 108a. 

109. Office Machines: Mimeograph and Mimeoscope. 

Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 3 or equivalent. 



Courses of Instruction 89 

Instruction in the use of the Mimeograph and the Mim- 

eoscope. 

The student is required to cut and run twelve stencils, 

three of which must be done on the Mimeoscope. All the 

jobs done for credit in this course must be approved by 

the instructor before the work is begun. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

114. Shorthand. 

Fall quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Mastery of Part I of the Functional Method of Gregg 
Manual with attention given to developing reading and 
writing skills. Students whose high school transcripts 
show credit for one year of shorthand must have special 
permission in order to receive credit for this course. 

115. Shorthand. 

Winter quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. Mastery of Part II, Functional 
Method Gregg Manual. 

The development of skill in taking new-matter dictation 
is stressed. Students whose high school transcripts show 
credit for two years of shorthand must have special per- 
mission in order to receive credit for this course. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 1 and 114. 

116. Shorthand. 

Spring quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. A review and completion of the 
principles of the Gregg Manual. Introduction to trans- 
cription at the typewriter. A speed of sixty words a min- 
ute is required for credit in this course. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 2 and 115. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

130. Principles of Accounting. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

The following fundamentals of accounting are discussed: 
the balance sheet, statement of profit and loss, ledger ac- 
counts, proprietorship accounts, bookkeeping procedures, 
adjusting and closing entries, books of original entry, and 
controlling accounts. Laboratory problems to illustrate. 
A practice set for proprietorship is used. Three extra 
hours per week required in the accounting laboratory. 



90 East Carolina Teachers College 

131. Principles of Accounting. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A study of interest and discount, valuation accounts, ac- 
crued and deferred items, the periodic summary, business 
practice and procedure, routine, recording, and partner- 
ships. A practice set for a partnership is used. Three 
extra hours per week required in the accounting lab- 
oratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 130. 

132. Principles of Accounting. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

The course includes such topics as: nature and charac- 
teristics of a corporation, corporate accounting, the 
voucher system, and cost accounting for manufacturing. 
A practice set for a corporation is used. Three extra hours 
per week required in the accounting laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 131. 

214. Secretarial Science. 

Fall quarter. Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Dictation course. Intensive practice in reading and dicta- 
tion, with emphasis on transcription. Instruction in secre- 
tarial practice. A speed of eighty words a minute is 
required for credit in this course. 

Three additional hours a week required at the typewriter. 
Prerequisites: Business Education 3, 116 or equivalent, 
English 1, 2, 3, 222. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

215. Secretarial Science. 

Winter quarter. Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A substitution may be made with the permission of the 

teacher of secretarial science. 

Dictation course. A continuation of Business Education 

214. A speed of 100 words a minute is required for credit 

in this course. 

Three additional hours a week, required at the typewriter. 

Prerequisites: Business Education 3 and 214. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



Courses of Instruction 91 

218. Office Management. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course is designed to train students to be able to 
meet the situations which will confront them when they 
enter a modern business office. The course includes an 
introduction to the use of dictation and transcribing ma- 
chines and instruction in filing. The course does not con- 
tain dictation work. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

223a. Materials and Methods of the Teaching of Book- 
keeping, General Business and Business Law. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Credited as Education 223be. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 

223b. Materials and Methods of the Teaching of Type- 
writing, Shorthand and Office Practice. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Credited as Education 223be. 
Prerequisites: Business Education 3 and 116. 

231. Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
This course is recommended to students in other depart- 
ments who wish to elect a course in business education. 
The course includes a discussion of law and its admin- 
istration, contracts, principal and agent, employer and 
employee, and negotiable instruments. 

232. Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
This course is recommended to students in other depart- 
ments who wish to elect a course in business education. 
Business Education 231 is not prerequisite to this course. 
The course includes a discussion of principal and surety, 
insurer and insured, bailor and bailee, carriers and ship- 
pers or passengers, vendor and vendee, partnerships and 
corporations. 

233. Business Law 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: junior standing. 



92 East Carolina Teachers College 

This course is recommended to students in other depart- 
ments who wish to elect a course in the field of business 
education. 

The course includes a discussion of property, deeds of 
conveyance, mortgagor and mortgagee, landlord and 
tenant, torts, business crimes, and bankrupt and creditors. 

234. Accounting Practice and Procedure. (Formerly B. 
E. 133.) 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to review accounting prac- 
tice and procedure in various types of business. Prac- 
tice materials are selected by the student from the fol- 
lowing: city government, automobile dealer, physician, 
lawyer, commission merchant, sporting goods merchant, 
and a farmer. 

Required of all business education majors who are candi- 
dates for the A.B. degree. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 130. 

235. Advanced Accounting Theory. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of advanced accounting theory including a review 
of the accounting process, statements from incomplete 
data, cash and receivables, inventories, investments, fixed 
assets, intangibles, liabilities, capital stock, and surplus. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 

236. Advanced Accounting Theory. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of advanced accounting theory including install- 
ment sales, cost accounting, correction of errors, state- 
ment of application of funds, analysis of financial 
statements, partnerships, joint ventures, consignments, 
and branch accounting. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 

237. Advanced Accounting Theory. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of advanced accounting theory including consoli- 
dated statements, statement of affairs, receivership ac- 
counting, estates and trusts, and acturarial science. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 



Courses of Instruction 93 

322G.a.b.c. Accounting Apprenticeship. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Six hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Prerequisite: Business Education 132 or equivalent. 
The student will be required to do supervised work in 
one of the following situations: Office work in an ap- 
proved office downtown; office work in an approved 
college office; retail selling in an approved downtown 
store; or supervision of accounting laboratories. 
Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

One quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 

quarter hours. 

Credited as Education 324be. 

330G. Federal Tax Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the special problems involved in the account- 
ing for income taxes, the capital stock tax, the gift tax, 
the estate tax, the excess profits tax, and social security 
taxes. 

A practice set is used which gives the student an oppor- 
tunity to prepare government forms. 

334G. Auditing. (Formerly B. E. 405) 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of auditing procedure, cash, securities, receiv- 
ables, inventories, fixed assets, and related topics. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132 or equivalent. 

340G. Cost Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is of value to those who intend to teach ac- 
counting. The student who plans to do public or private 
accounting work will find the course helpful. 
Topics: method of collecting costs of material, labor, and 
overhead; perpetual inventories; legal phases of cost ac- 
counting; cost accounting for departments and branches. 
A manufacturing set is a part of the required work. 
Three extra hours per week required in the accounting 
laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 



94 East Carolina Teachers College 

341. Salesmanship. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

A course for prospective teachers of salesmanship, and 
for students who expect to do actual selling. 
The course covers basic principles which underlie all 
selling and the practical application of these principles 
through actual selling experience in the stores of Green- 
ville. Demonstrations are given by successful salesmen; 
field trips are made. 

A course for prospective teachers of salesmanship and 
students who expect to do actual selling. 
Topics: selling problems of employers; the relations be- 
tween salesmen and employer; the selling talk; types of 
customers; creating desire, answering objections, arousing 
interest. 

Actual selling experience in the stores of Greenville is a 
part of this course. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit: six quar- 
ter hours. 

Credited as Education 400 a. b. c. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

401. Problems in Business Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed for business teachers who wish to make 
special investigations of certain phases of business educa- 
tion. Topics for study include curriculum making, admin- 
istration of business departments, and the equipment of a 
department. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

410. Current Trends in Business. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Emphasis is placed upon recent developments in the field 
of business and in the field of business education. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

412S. C. P. A. Problems — Accounting Theory and 
Practice. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
An intensive study of accounting problems that have been 
used in C. P. A. examinations by the American Institute 
of Accountants. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of college accounting. 



Courses of Instruction 95 

413S. C. P. A. Problems— Auditing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

An intensive study of auditing problems that have been 

used in C. P. A. examinations by the American Institute 

of Accountants. 

Prerequisite: 9 hours of college accounting. 

414S. C. P. A. Problems — Commercial Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

An intensive study of legal problems that have been used 

in C. P. A. examinations by the American Institute of 

Accountants. 

Prerequisite: 9 hours of college accounting and 6 hours 

of college business law. 

415S. Advanced Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The law of negotiable instruments is emphasized in this 

course. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

416S. Advanced Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The law of contracts is emphasized in this course. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

417S. Advanced Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a course covering business law problems. The 
student will develop a research investigation of one of 
the following legal situations: law and its administration, 
sale of personal property, employer-employee, insurer- 
insured, business organizations, real property, and torts 
and business crimes. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

420S. Skill Building in Typewriting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is concerned with the techniques of skill 

building at the typewriter. Emphasis is placed upon 

specific learning aids and the development of correct 

typing procedures. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 



96 East Carolina Teachers College 

42 IS. Skill Building in Gregg Shorthand. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is concerned with the building of skill in 
Gregg Shorthand. Shortcuts in the skill building program 
are examined and tested. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

430. The Business Education Curriculum. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with an interpretation of the modern 
philosophy of business education. The purpose of the 
course is to develop principles of curriculum building 
that harmonize with a workable philosophy of secondary 
education in a democracy. 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Adams, Miss Charlton, Miss Coates, Mr. Haynes, 
Miss Newell, Miss Wahl 

1. Introduction to Education. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Open to freshmen only. Upperclassmen see advisers for 
substitute course for Education 1. 

The purpose of this course is to orient the prospective 
teacher in the field of education. To a certain extent, the 
instructors select the topics that they find the varying 
groups of freshmen need. 

Such individual problems as the development of effective 
study habits, improvement of reading skills, and the prob- 
lems of adjustment are given first consideration. The fol- 
lowing general topics are covered: the organization of our 
American public school system, current tendencies, con- 
temporary problems, and educational activities which 
seem most promising today. 

200. Literature for Children. 

Fall and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

Required of majors in primary education. 

A content course designed to give a survey of the best 

that world literature has to offer children, with emphasis 

on those forms which have the most interest for them. 

Also to help students establish for themselves standards 



Courses of Instruction 97 

for the selection and appraising literature for young 
children. Wide reading and library materials are likewise 
included. 

201a.b.c. Contemporary Education. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Elective for juniors and seniors. 

The group meets not less than ten times per quarter and 
attendance at all meetings is necessary for credit. 
Not more than twenty students are permitted to enroll 
in this course for any one quarter. 

In this course each student is expected to select some 
topic of current interest in education and discuss it satis- 
factorily before the group. Credit is given without ex- 
amination. 

206. Language Arts: Language in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students working for the primary certi- 
ficate. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the language needs of young children and the 
school's part in providing for these needs. The following 
topics will be emphasized: factors affecting the child's 
language growth; language as social behavior; compe- 
tencies in the use of Language (both oral and written) 
to be developed in the primary school; curriculum ma- 
terial in relation to language; writing and spelling skills 
necessary in written language. 

207. Language Arts: Reading in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students working for the primary certifi- 
cate. 

Topics: reading as an interpretive process; trends in 
reading instruction; reading readiness; a reading program 
for the grades, including initial reading activities; and 
an acquaintance with the basic reading materials, includ- 
ing the state-adopted texts. Class activities include ob- 
servation in the laboratory school, oral and written 
reports, and the making of chart stories. 

208. Language Arts: Reading in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



98 East Carolina Teachers College 

Required of all students working for the primary certifi- 
cate. 

Evaluation of the most desirable reading materials; con- 
sideration of illustrators of children's books and the New- 
bery and Caldecott Medal books; reading for information 
and pleasure; independence in word recognition; place 
of phonics; and the use of the library center in the pri- 
mary classroom; class activities include observation in 
the laboratory school and the preparation of bulletin 
board material and notices. 
Prerequisite: Ed. 207 or its equivalent. 

223. Methods of Teaching in the High School. 

Two quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours each term. 

Required of all students working for the high school cer- 
tificate. 

A student preparing to teach special subjects in the high 
school is required to take high school methods in the 
department of his major and minor subjects. For further 
particulars see the methods courses outlined in detail 
under the departments and numbered 223. 

248. Reading in the Grammar Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all students working for grammar-grade cer- 
tificate. 

The purpose of this course is to make a study of: the 
present tendencies in reading; the primary background 
essential for success at the grammar grade level; the ma- 
jor objectives of oral and silent reading; the uses of the 
different types of reading; the abilities to be acquired 
during this period; the evaluation and selection of appro- 
priate material; and ways of handling these. 

306G. Social Sciences in the Primary Grades. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Open to seniors and graduate students only. 
The purpose of this course is to show child development 
through social science experiences. 

Topics: ways the social sciences develop; content of the 
social sciences; arrangement of environment conducive to 
children's social growth; participating in making records 
of children's social science curriculum in action; and 
making studies of play materials, books, pictures, and 
stories. 



Courses of Instruction 99 

307G. The Primary School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Senior elective. 

Emphasis is laid on the professional growth necessary if 
the prospective teacher is to make a success in this field. 
This course consists of observations in the laboratory 
school followed by readings in primary education for the 
purpose of evaluating classroom activities; conducting 
teacher-pupil conferences; studying the curriculum; and 
discovering what may be expected of the child during 
and at the close of this period. 

308. Story Telling. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of the fundamental principles 
and techniques of telling stories and the selection of suit- 
able materials. 

Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on correct 
pronunciation and clear enunciation. 

315. Directed Observation in the Elementary School. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Limited Registration. 

This course is planned for those who wish guidance in 
the observation of good teaching. Students will observe 
in groups and individually. Observations in the Training 
School will be followed by discussions in which analysis 
and evaluation in terms of fundamental principles will 
be made. Students will be directed in readings relating 
to their individual problems. 

318e. Classroom Management. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: Three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of all primary and grammar grade majors. 
This course is given for primary and grammar grade 
majors during the quarter in which they do their student- 
teaching. 

The topics considered are: Common problems related to 
teaching in general and the student's teaching in particu- 
lar; professional ethics; organization of the classroom for 
living and learning; planning the daily program in terms 
of the children's needs; the keeping of records and prepar- 
ation of reports; the relation of the school, home, and 
community; professional organizations — their publica- 
tions and materials; and the characteristics of a good 
school. (High School Majors see administration 318s.) 



100 East Carolina Teachers College 

320. Visual Aids in Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective: Open to juniors and seniors. 
The purpose of this course is to aid teachers in utilizing 
the more important types of visual materials, including 
slides, prints, and the motion picture. Particular attention 
is given to the problem of selection and the integration of 
these materials in the school program. 
Students are given instruction in the operation of equip- 
ment and the preparation of materials. 

322. History of Education in the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all four-year primary and grammar-grade 
students. This course considers the significant phases in 
the development of education in the United States from 
the Colonial foundation to the present time. Great Amer- 
ican educators and their contributions are stressed. At- 
tention is directed to outstanding current problems in 
education which are demanding solution and an aggres- 
sive attitude toward these problems is encouraged. 

324. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the High 
School. 

Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve quarter hours. 
This course is represented in the high school departments 
under the No. 324. 

325. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The course considers the present problems of secondary 
education, curricula, aims in high school education, or- 
ganization and administration, and summarizes in a 
general way the other courses in secondary education. 

330G. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. 
Aim: to drill students in manipulation of educational data 
for purposes of interpretation. 

Topics: tabular and graphic methods; measures of central 
tendency, variability, and relationships; norms; T-score; 
B-score; and principles of sampling. 



Courses of Instruction 101 

339. Directed Observation in the Elementary School. 

Three hours a week. 

Three hours credit. Required of all Primary and Gram- 
mar Majors as a prerequisite to practice teaching. 
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for prac- 
tice teaching. Through directed observations of children 
and teachers at work in the Training School the student 
will be better prepared for her student teaching during 
the following quarter. Toward the end of the quarter the 
student's observations will be confined to the grade in 
which she will do her practice teaching. 

341-2-3. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the 
Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Credit: twelve quarter hours. 
Required of all Primary Majors. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student actual 
teaching experience. Induction takes place gradually 
and as rapidly as the student shows a readiness for re- 
sponsible teaching. Participation in the major activities 
of a teacher, including home visitation, is provided. 
Regular conferences with the critic teacher are given 
over to the evaluation of observation work, to the prob- 
lems encountered by the student teacher and to the plan- 
ning of further work. During this quarter the student 
spends the entire school day in the Training School. 

344-5-6-7. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the 
Grammar Grades. 

Every quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 

quarter hours. 

Required of all grammar-grade majors. 

In this course the student teaches several subjects to the 

class as a whole and during the quarter probably teaches 

the whole classs the entire day for one or more days. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six quarter 
hours. 

For graduate students only. 

In this course each student, under the direction and guid- 
ance of his adviser, presents at least one problem or sub- 
ject each quarter. These problems are to be discussed 
and each student is supposed to take the lead in the dis- 
cussion of his problem. Problems are to be chosen from 



102 East Carolina Teachers College 

major fields. The study of the problem must show original 
research or original organization on the part of the stu- 
dent presenting it. 

405S. Investigation in the Teaching of Reading. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to graduate students only. 

The course consists in making an analytical study of re- 
searches that have been reported on the various phases of 
the teaching of reading. The child's difficulties in becom- 
ing familiar with the reading processes, the teaching 
difficulties in the subject, remedial work designed for 
the child's benefit, and a critical evaluation of the re- 
search studies with special reference to the psychological 
principles involved and the educational implications to 
be derived are given serious consideration in this course. 

412S. Improvement of Reading Instruction in the 
Primary Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned for teachers of experience. Indi- 
vidual teaching problems will be given consideration. 
Topics: Factors conditioning children's success in reading; 
a study of the experiences of children which affect their 
reading interests; the utilization of these interests in the 
acquiring of desirable reading attitudes, habits, and skills; 
evaluation of methods of teaching reading, and materials 
characteristic of current practice. Demonstrations of the 
telebinocular and other mechanized reading aids are a 
part of this course. 
There will be observations in the Training School. 

416. Problems of the Primary Teacher. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a problem course. It is planned for experienced 
teachers who wish to work on some specific problem or 
problems in their respective fields. Each student will 
have the opportunity to make an intensive study of his 
problem in its relation to the school program. There will 
be regularly scheduled observations in the Training 
School provided for the members of the class. 

417a.S. Study of Some of the Major Problems of the 
Grammar Grades. 

The student will distribute the working time each week 
as follows: A minimum of two hours observation in the 



Courses of Instruction 103 

Training School, two hours library work, two hours 
group conference a week, and three hours a week in 
conference with the instructor. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

The class divides into working committees with a chair- 
man and a secretary. Each committee schedules its own 
time and place for meetings. Each student selects some 
major problem or problems with which he wants to work. 
A list of these problems is given to the teacher for evalua- 
tion before the student begins work on them. 
Reports are to be presented both orally to the whole 
group, and to the teacher in writing with complete records 
of individual and group activities attached. The chairman 
of each group keeps a check on attendance for individuals 
in his group. * 

Pre-observation conference with the critic teachers is 
necessary before observing in the room. The groups meet 
the critic teachers in conference following the observa- 
tions. 

417b.S. Study of Some of the Major Problems of the 
Grammar Grades. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is a continuation of Education 417a. New 
problems will constitute the content of this course. The 
student will distribute the working time each week as 
follows: A minimum of two hours observation in the 
Training School; two hours library work; two hours in 
group conference; and three hours each week in confer- 
ence with the instructor. 

417c.S. Study of Some of the Major Problems of the 
Grammar Grades. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

This is a continuation of Education 417a and Education 
417b. New problems will constitute the content of this 
course. The student will distribute the working time 
each week as follows: A minimum of two hours observa- 
tion in Training School; two hours library work; two 
hours in group conference; and three hours each week in 
conference with the instructor. 

420. Visual Aids in Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

For teachers and administrators who wish to make use of 

objective teaching aids, including the school journey, 



104 East Carolina Teachers College 

slides, prints, and the motion picture. Available materials 
in these fields are surveyed and attention given to the 
problem of selection and integrated use in the school pro- 
gram. 

Sources of suppy for all materials and projection ap- 
paratus, and care of materials and equipment will be 
considered. A survey of literature in this field will be 
made. 

422. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course takes up the historical development of the 
principles and practices of education from the earliest 
times to the present. Education as an expression of the 
aims of life for the individual and social group is studied. 

423. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Education 422. 

426. Modern Trends in Secondary Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to make an analytical study 
of the shifts and changes of emphasis current in the field 
of secondary education. 

Trends as they are found (a) in current educational litera- 
ture; (b) in changing emphasis observable in curriculum 
materials; and (c) in current beliefs as to the functions 
of the junior high school and the junior college. Special 
effort is directed to the philosophical antecedents of edu- 
cational practice. 

427. The Beginning and Development of Secondary 
Education in the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective for seniors. 

This course traces the transfer of the secondary school 
from its origin in Europe to the United States; its early 
beginnings as a private or semi-private institution here; 
its development into a tax-supported institution; and its 
rapid growth and development since 1900. 

430. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. Con- 
tinuation of Administration and Supervision 330. 



Courses of Instruction 105 

Topics: partial correlations, multiple correlations, linear 
regressions, use of normal probability curve to interpret 
data; weighing scores; comparing groups; tabulations, etc. 
Prerequisite: Educational Statistics 330. 

480. Interpretation and Use of Research Reports. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all master's degree candidates. 
The purpose of this course is to provide some training and 
experience in the field of educational research and in the 
more intensive specialization usually associated with it. 

ENGLISH 

Miss Turner, Mrs. Browning, Miss Charles, Miss Greene, Miss 
Greer, Miss Grigsby, Miss Hooper, Mr. Posey 

1. Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen. 

An intensive study in the fundamentals of English in an 
attempt to discover and correct weaknesses in speaking 
and writing: a review of grammar, punctuation, and 
capitalization; note-taking; the use of the library; elemen- 
tary outlining, and writing short themes. Each student is 
expected to own a standard collegiate dictionary for use 
in this course and in English 2 and 3. 

2. Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen. 

Word-study, sentence and paragraph structure, letter 
writing, and descriptive and narrative writing, with some 
practice in such other specialized forms as book review- 
ing and news writing. 

3. Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen. 

Topics for half the term: writing simple essays, making 
short talks of a practical nature, and reading aloud; for 
the other half of the term: selecting an appropriate topic, 
reading, taking notes, making a bibliography, preparing 
topical and sentence outlines, and finally writing a source 
theme. 



106 East Carolina Teachers College 

110. American Literature. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in English. 

A survey of American literature from its beginning to 

about 1870. Collateral reading required. 

111. American Literature. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of majors in English. 

A continuation of English 110, bringing the survey to 
1900. 

112a. English Literature. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in English. 

A survey of English literature from the beginning to 1660. 

112b. English Literature. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of majors in English. 
A continuation, bringing the survey to 1832. 

112c. English Literature. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 
A continuation, bringing the survey to 1914. 

114a.b.c. The Bible as Literature. 

Fall, winter, spring. One hour a week. Credit for each 
course: one quarter hour. 

Study of literary types: prose narrative, poem, oration, 
essay, sermon, and letter. 

117. Parliamentary Procedure. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Offered once a year. 

The study and practice of such parliamentary procedure 
as is needed to take part in or conduct ordinary meet- 
ings — the handling of common motions, the question of 
what motions take precedence, and the proper motions 
to use to accomplish various purposes. 



Courses of Instruction 107 

118. Debating. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

Offered once a year. 

Study and practice in debating. 

119. Voice and Diction. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Systematic study of English speech sounds, with exer- 
cises to develop a clear, pleasing voice. Emphasis upon 
correction of the simpler forms of speech problems, and 
upon training the voice as a tool for professional success. 

206. Reading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of English majors working for the A.B. degree. 
A general course that gives opportunity for building up 
good reading habits and correction of poor habits by the 
acquisition of techniques required for the various types 
of reading matter, including both literary and practical 
materials. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis of reading 
troubles and remedial measures. 

213. Advanced Composition. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of English majors. 

Practice in various forms of writing, along with the study 
of models. Correctness and development of individual 
style stressed. 

214a.b.c. Laboratory Courses in Composition. 

Fall, winter, spring, respectively. Credit for each course: 
one quarter hour. 

Of special value to members of the newspaper staff and to 
majors in English interested in journalism in high school. 
Practical forms of writing, such as news, feature stories, 
editorials, book reviews, and bulletins. Laboratory 
method that gives each student individual attention and 
practical experience in the kind of writing in which he is 
most interested. 

216. Young People's Literature. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of English majors working for the A.B. degree. 



108 East Carolina Teachers College 

Wide reading, by types, of material appropriate for ado- 
lescents; a thorough study of representative selections; 
considerable attention to book selection. 

218. Oral English. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Oral reading, short-topic discussion, and participation in 

meetings, with emphasis upon the overcoming of stage 

fright and the establishing of correct pronunciation, clear 

enunciation, and the ability to talk well before a group. 

219. World Masterpieces in Translations. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. 

A reading course in superior translations of a number of 

classical and modern masterpieces of Continental Europe. 

222. English Grammar. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of majors in English. 

223. The Teaching of English in High School. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of English majors working for the A.B. degree. 
(See Education 223.) 

Principles and methods of teaching literary and composi- 
tion types; some attention to the activities of major or- 
ganizations, publishing houses, and teachers in the field; 
some practice in the examination and evaluation of text- 
books, professional writings, maps, pictures, and other 
helps. 

224. The Forms of Poetry. 

Winter quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

A study of meter, stanzaic forms, figures of speech, and 

rhyme, with special emphasis on harmony of form and 

content. 

225. The Short Story. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Offered in alternate years. 



Courses of Instruction 109 

A study of many representative examples, with some at- 
tention to the history of the short story as a distinct lit- 
erary type. 

234. English in the Grammar Grades: Language — Com- 
position. 

Fall and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: English 222. 

Required of majors in grammar-grade education. 
A course that aims to familiarize the student with the 
standards and content of language-composition on the 
grammar-grade level; and to present principles of, and 
give practical training in, teaching language through 
activity curricula in which language is functional for real 
needs and in which the normal opportunities are provided 
for creative writing. 

313. Literature for the Grammar Grades. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

Required of majors in grammar-grade education. 

A comprehensive survey of the field of literature on the 

grammar-grade level. An intensive study of the types 

emphasized with examples of each, and wide parallel 

reading, and guidance in book selection for individuals 

and for grade libraries. 

314G. Modern Drama. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 
Elective. 

Offered in alternate years. 

A study of representative modern dramatists — Maeter- 
linck, Hauptmann, Galsworthy, Barrie, Shaw, O'Neill, 
and a number of others — with some attention to types 
and movements. 

315. The Novel. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the development of the English novel, the fol- 
lowing novelists being considered through lectures and 
critical discussion: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, 
Sterne, Johnson, Goldsmith, Jane Austen, Thackeray, 



110 East Carolina Teachers College 

Dickens, George Eliot, the Brontes, Trollope, Hardy, 
Meredith, Barrie, Hawthorne, James, Howells, and Mark 
Twain. Parallel reading required. 

319G. Modern Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Offered in alternate years. 

A survey of American and English poetry from 1900 to 
the present time, including a study of the poetic move- 
ments and contemporary trends of the major poets, and 
representative poems. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

Every quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 

quarter hours. 

Required of English majors working for the A.B. degree. 

(See Education 324.) 

Directed observation; frequent conferences with critic 

teacher and supervisor; participation in class and, when 

possible, in extracurricular activities; practice teaching. 

325. Shakespeare. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of English majors. 

Ten or more plays of Shakespeare studied and discussed 
in class. 

326G. Romantic Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Prerequisite: English 112b. Offered in alternate years. 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats em- 
phasized. Some attention to lesser contemporaries. 

327G. Victorian Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the work of the leading poets of the Victorian 
Era — Arnold, Clough, Mrs. Browning, the Rossettis, Mor- 
ris, Swinburne, and others, with special emphasis on the 
poetry of Tennyson and Browning. 



Courses of Instruction 111 

330. Acting and Interpretation. (Formerly 332). 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Prerequisite: English 119, or consent of the instructor. 
Interpretation of scenes from plays; study of the basic 
principles of acting; elementary exercises in voice and 
pantomime; development of characterization, individually 
and ensemble; advanced problems in rehearsal and public 
performance. 

331. Directing and Rehearsal of Plays. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Prerequisite: English 330, or consent of the instructor. 
Problems of the stage director. Designing the production 
as a whole, with consideration of the choice of play, cast- 
ing, rehearsal, stage decor, stage and business manage- 
ment. Participation in public performances to be ar- 
ranged. 

332. High School Dramatics. (Formerly 330). 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Prerequisite: English 331, or consent of instructor. 
Play production from the point of view of the high school 
teacher-director, with emphasis upon effective theatre 
presentation and the use of dramatics as a tool for de- 
veloping personality. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter 
hours. 

A study of bibliographical practice and method in connec- 
tion with thesis writing. Round table discussions of fin- 
ished products a necessary part of the work. 

405. Current Problems in English. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A critical study of those statistical investigations, labora- 
tory experiments, and philosophical writings which re- 
cord the status and point out the needs and the prospects 
in the teaching of English. 



112 East Carolina Teachers College 

413. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Studies in English literature to 1750, selected by the in- 
structor upon consultation with the students. 

414. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Studies in English literature from 1750 to 1900, selected 

by the instructor upon consultation with the students. 

415S. Principles of Literary Criticism. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A study of the theory and practice of critics, together with 

written criticisms of prose and poetry. 

416S. Principles and Types of Poetry. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A study of versification and poetic types. 

417S. Principles and Practices in Advanced Composition. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 3, and 213. 
Daily themes, criticisms, editorials, book reviews, inti- 
mate essays, and related types. 

418. Studies in American Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Studies in American literature selected by the instructor 

upon consultation with the students. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Mr. Fleming, Miss Austin 

FRENCH 

Students entering college with exceptional background 
in language are encouraged to take a comprehensive writ- 
ten, oral and reading examination in the language or lan- 
guages of their choice in order that they may be properly 



Courses of Instruction 113 

placed and permitted to advance as rapidly as their ca- 
pacity and ability will permit. 

1, 2, 3. Elementary and Intermediate French. 

Three hours of recitation and two hours of laboratory a 
week throughout the year. Credit: three hours a quarter. 
An accelerated course in elementary and intermediate 
French running through three quarters. Designed to 
meet the needs of Freshmen who have not received credit 
in French for admission to college. Those having re- 
ceived such credit should enroll in French 11, unless 
their preparation is inadequate, in which case they may 
register for this course. Those who complete this course 
satisfactorily will not be requested to take Intermediate 
French 11, 12, and 13. No credit is given for the elemen- 
tary portion of the course. No two beginners' courses in 
foreign languages may be taken at the same time. 

11, 12, 13. Intermediate French. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Required of students specializing in French. 
Students specializing in French must pass this course or 
the equivalent with a grade of "3" or above before enter- 
ing more advanced courses in French. No credit will be 
granted for 11 and 12 unless followed by 13. 

101, 102, 103. Special Introductory Course. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Elective to any student who has not had a course in 
French. Especially designed for upperclassmen who wish 
an introduction to the language. 

104, 105, 106. Advanced Grammar, Composition, and 
Reading. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Required of students specializing in French. 
Grammar, composition, dictation, analytical reading, 
vocabulary building, comprehensive reading. 

107. French Translation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Translation of French plays and short stories. 



114 East Carolina Teachers College 

114. Contributions of the Romance Languages to the 
English Vocabulary. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Elective. No knowledge of Foreign Languages required. 
A course designed to show the relationship of these lan- 
guages and to aid in vocabulary building. 

125. Phonetics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all students specializing in French. 
A thorough study of phonetic principles — the phonetic 
triangle, French vowels and consonants and their relation 
to each other — and their practical application in prose, 
poetry and song. Regular exercises in correct pronuncia- 
tion, diction, and intonation. 

207, 208. French Literature and Composition. 

One quarter each, respectively. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Required of students specializing in French. 

Selected readings in French literature. Analytical study 

of texts. 

209. French Literature and Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Rapid comprehensive reading of selected texts. 

211. Survey Course. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Lectures, translations, assigned readings and reports. 
The intent of this course is to give the student a general 
basis for more specific work in literature. 

212. Grammar Review. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A rapid review of grammar. Recommended to students 

who plan to teach French. 

215. French Commercial Practice. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of commercial practice as revealed in French 
newspapers, magazines, and commercial literature, pre- 
ceded by a brief survey of economic France. Studies in 
modern business letter-writing. 



Courses of Instruction 115 

223. The Teaching of French. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of students specializing in French. 
Prerequisite: 18 credits in French or Junior standing. 
The aim of this course is to give practical help towards 
meeting the problems arising in teaching French in the 
high schools; planning course of study, variety of process, 
reference books, aids to study. 

225. Conversational French. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in French. 
Prerequisite: French 125. 

313, 314. History of French Literature. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 

316. French Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

317. Advanced French Reading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
History of France in its relationship to French Literature. 

318. Advanced French Reading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

320. Choses Francaises. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all students specializing in French. 
A general informational course on France and the French 
people, intending to give the teacher of the language a 
background and fund of information useful in the teach- 
ing of French. 

321. The Novel. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the development of the French Novel during 

the nineteenth century. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

One quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 
quarter hours. 



116 East Carolina Teachers College 

Required of all students who are preparing to teach 
French in the high school. 

325. Conversational French. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in French. 
Prerequisite: French 125. 

350. Laboratory Seminar. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A seminar dealing in individual and group projects de- 
signed to familiarize the student with language materials 
and to stimulate interest in a foreign civilization. 

SPANISH 

1, 2, 3. Elementary and Intermediate Spanish 

Three hours of recitation and two hours of laboratory a 
week throughout the year. Credit: three hours a quarter. 
An accelerated course in elementary and intermediate 
Spanish running through three quarters, designed to meet 
the needs of Freshmen who have not received credit in 
Spanish for admission to college. Those having received 
such credit should enroll in Spanish 11, unless their 
preparation is inadequate, in which case they may regis- 
ter for this course. 

Those who complete this course satisfactorily will not 
be requested to take intermediate Spanish (11, 12, 13). 
No credit is given for the elementary portion of the 
course. 

No two beginners' courses in foreign languages may be 
taken at the same time. 

11, 12, 13. Intermediate Spanish. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Students specializing in Spanish must pass this course or 
the equivalent with a grade of "3" or above before enter- 
ing more advanced courses in Spanish. 

101, 102, 103. Special Introductory Course. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Elective to any student who has not had a course in 
Spanish. 

Especially designed for upperclassmen who wish an in- 
troduction to the language. 



Courses of Instruction 117 

104, 105, 106. Advanced Grammar and Reading. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters, respectively. Three 
hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Required of students specializing in Spanish. 
Grammar, dictation, analytical reading, vocabulary build- 
ing, comprehensive reading. 

125. Self-expression in Spanish. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in Spanish. 
Training in oral work designed to develop facility in self- 
expression in the language. Emphasis on pronunciation, 
vocabulary growth, and idiomatic expressions most fre- 
quently used in conversation. 

207, 208. Reading and Composition. 

One quarter each. Three hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Required of students specializing in Spanish. 

Selected readings in Spanish literature. Analytical study 

of texts. 

209. Reading and Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Rapid comprehensive reading of selected texts. 

212. Grammar Review. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A rapid review of grammar. Recommended to students 

who plan to teach Spanish. 

223. The Teaching of Spanish. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of students specializing in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: 18 quarter hours in Spanish or Junior stand- 
ing. 

The aim of this course is to give practical help towards 
meeting the problems arising in teaching Spanish in the 
high schools; planning course of study, variety of process, 
reference books, aids to study. 

225. Conversational Spanish. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 125. 



118 East Carolina Teachers College 

313, 314. Survey of Spanish Literature. 

Fall and winter quarters, respectively. Three hours a 

week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

A course designed to correlate previous readings with 

the whole field of Spanish literature and to present other 

works with which the student of Spanish will wish to be 

acquainted. 

316. Spanish Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

320. Cosas Espanolas. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed to develop an understanding and ap- 
preciation of Spanish and Spanish- American civilization. 
Here the student should gain and organize information 
to serve as a background for teaching Spanish. 

321. The Modern Spanish Novel. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the Spanish novel of the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth centuries. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

One quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 
quarter hours. 

Required of all students who are preparing to teach 
Spanish in the high school. 

325. Conversational Spanish. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 125. 

327. Spanish Drama of the Golden Age. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

328. Spanish Prose of the Golden Age. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

GERMAN 

111, 112, 113. Beginning German. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Elective to any student who has not had a course in Ger- 
man of college level. 



Courses of Instruction 119 

These courses are intended to give the student ability to 
read simple German, to pronounce correctly, and to use 
the language, orally or written, within certain limits; 
and to give an increased interest in German and the Ger- 
man people. 

214, 215, 216. Second Year German. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours each. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Mr. Picklesimer, Mr. Browne, Mr. Cummings 

Geography justifies its place in the curriculum on ac- 
count of its practical utility and cultural value. The in- 
struction in this department deals with the relations and 
adjustments of people to their environment. The courses 
offered here include several phases of the subject. 

Students may choose Geography, as a major or minor 
for the B.S.; and M.A. degrees. It is also possible to major 
in the Social Studies with special emphasis on Geography, 
for the A.B. degree. The course requirements for these 
curricula are announced elsewhere in this catalogue. 

10. The Earth and Man. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A prerequisite for all other courses in geography except 
125, 310, and 330. 

Geography 10 is the fundamental course of the depart- 
ment, being designed with two objectives in mind: first, 
to supply a background of factual material and principles 
of value to students; second, to establish certain facts and 
principles concerning regional possibilities as affected by 
various environmental conditions, both singly and in 
selected combinations upon which those planning addi- 
tional work in the field of geography may build, leaving 
complete synthesis of these factors for future regional 
courses. 

11. Human Geography. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 



120 East Carolina Teachers College 

In this course an attempt is made to show how man occu- 
pies and uses the land. The basis of approach is through 
types. 

12. Economic Geography of the United States and 
Canada. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A study of the character of economic geography; the place 
and nature of agriculture; food resources; cereals, vege- 
tables, fruits, animals, and fish; fundamentals of manu- 
facturing; basic minerals, power; timbered areas and 
industries connected with the American forest; textile 
industries; leather and rubber; chemicals; mineral in- 
dustries. Some instruction is given in the securing and 
presenting of geographic data. 

110. Geography of North America. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A detailed study of the major natural and cultural regions 
of the continent. This course should be especially valu- 
able for fifth grade teachers and generally helpful to 
others seeking a geographical knowledge of their own 
continent. 

112. Geography of Europe. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course includes a study of the location, area, relief, 
climate, and coasts of Europe. Emphasis is placed upon 
the operation of geographic factors in the movement and 
distribution of peoples in the continent; the origin and 
development of European civilization; and the economic 
and social development of European states. 

113. Economic Geography of Foreign Countries. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the industrial and commercial activities of the 
leading countries of the world, as influenced by geo- 
graphic conditions; international commercial problems; 
examination and use of geographic data. 

125. Physical Geology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course includes a study of the origin of the earth, its 

geologic and physiographic features, and the forces active 



Courses of Instruction 121 

in modifying the rocks and surface of the land in present 
times. The student is taught to identify the common 
rocks. When possible a field trip is made into the Ap- 
palachian Mountains and the Great Valley. 

160. Geography of Representative Regions. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A detailed study of the principal economic activities of 
five or six regions in the middle and low latitudes in 
various parts of the world. Emphasis is placed upon 
types. The course is devised especially to assist grammar- 
grade teachers. 

210. Geography of South America. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A course on the racial, economic, and political aspects of 

South American geography. Special attention is given to 

trade relations between this continent and the leading 

industrial nations of the world. 

211. Geography of Asia. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course is a study of the physiographic, climatic and 
human use regions of Asia. Japan, China, Russia, and 
India are studied in considerable detail. 

212. Historical Geography of the United States. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

A study of some of the natural environmental conditions 
to which man has adjusted himself in the settlement and 
development of America. This course should be very 
helpful to teachers of geography, history, and the other 
social studies. 

215. Geography of Africa. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This is a continental study. In organization, it is similar 

to such geography courses as 110, 112, 210, and 211. 

221. Educational Geography. 

Credited as Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Principles of selection, organization, and presentation of 



122 East Carolina Teachers College 

geographic materials on the various grammar-grade 
levels; illustrative geographic units; fundamentals of 
technique in using maps, pictures, graphs, statistics, and 
other library materials in teaching geography. Some 
time is given to observation of geography teaching in the 
demonstration school. 

223. Materials and Methods in High School Geography. 
Credited as Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Selection of geographical material on the high school 
level; analysis of standard text books for high school 
geography; the fundamentals of good technique in teach- 
ing the subject; and classroom procedures which apply 
to these fundamentals. 

230. Industrial Geography for Elementary Teachers. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course is especially designed to help elementary 
teachers to understand, and to interpret, the geography 
and the processing of the more or less commonplace prod- 
ucts used by man. Sources of materials for teachers in 
service will be emphasized. 

310G. Conservation of Natural Resources. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

An intensive study of the conservation of the soil, min- 
erals, forests, waterways and water power of the United 
States, based upon a careful consideration of the natural 
resources. Frequent reference is made to the resources 
of foreign countries. Attention is given also to the con- 
servation and development of the resources of North 
Carolina. 

315G. Geography of Australia. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
In organization, this course is similar to the other con- 
tinental studies of the department. The subject matter, 
however, is treated in greater detail and the work is more 
intensive. 

320. Cartography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course presents the knowledge necessary to intelli- 
gent map construction and interpretation. The various 



Courses of Instruction 123 

projections and their respective limitations are set forth, 
as well as the methods and conventions of practical map 
making. Some attention is given to the construction of 
the physiographic diagram and to graphics. 

330. Peoples of the Earth. 

Credited as Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the primary 
teacher with subject matter of a geographic nature, to- 
gether with appropriate teaching procedures, for chil- 
dren in grades one to four inclusive. Emphasis is like- 
wise placed upon the seasonal needs of people in the home 
community and, with the gradual expanding of the child's 
horizon, the future teacher is shown how the geography of 
a few simple and distant areas may be handled. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Credited as Education 400 a.b.c. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter 
hours. 

A study of bibliographical practice and method in con- 
nection with thesis writing. Advice as to suitable subjects 
for original research papers and discussions of finished 
products are necessary phases of the course. 

410S. Geography of World Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of current international problems in the light of 
their environmental setting. Emphasis is placed upon the 
following topics: geography and the evolution of nations; 
the expansion of Europe; European influence in world 
affairs; the British Empire and its many problems; geog- 
raphy and conflicting interests of the war-torn nations of 
Europe and Asia and their effects upon the United States. 

420S. Geography of Latin America. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course has a threefold purpose: first, to establish a 
better understanding and appreciation of the regions, 
countries, and products of Latin America; second, to 
survey the conditions that have retarded or promoted its 
progress; and, third, to point out the reciprocal relations 
between these areas and the United States in defense of 
the Western Hemisphere. 



124 East Carolina Teachers College 

430. Readings in Geography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a course of carefully supervised readings and dis- 
cussions in the several phases of geography, and is in- 
tended both to broaden and intensify the student's interest 
in the subject. 

440. Climatology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The first part of the course is devoted to a rapid and inten- 
sive survey of climatic controls. This is followed by a 
study of the various climatic classifications, together with 
a comparison of the major climatic environments found 
in different parts of the world. The student will be di- 
rected in compiling, graphing, and mapping climatic data, 
and in interpreting the results. 

450S. Economic Geography of the South 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A detailed study of the influences of geography on the de- 
velopment of the several regions of the American South. 
From the basis of physical complex, through economic 
products, are traced the lines of force that determine the 
life and labor of the contemporary South in Cotton Belt 
and Piney Woods, Delta and Southern Highlands, Indus- 
trial Piedmont and Texas Oil Fields, Sugar Bowl and 
Fishing Fringe, Rice Zone, and Florida subtropics. 

460. Geography of the Orient. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
It is the purpose of this course to assist the student in 
understanding the geography of Eastern Asia in the light 
of the recent world conflict. The approach is through a 
study of race, political and social customs; regions and 
their commodities; and types of industry and commerce. 

470. Problems in Regional Geography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The instruction in this course is largely centered about 
three phases of regional geography: first, the principles of 
regional delineation and interpretation; second, a careful 
study of a few types; and third, individual research on 
one or more regions, the number depending on the scope 
of the subject. 



Courses of Instruction 125 

480. Problems in Economic Geography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Although emphasis is placed upon regional differentiation 
of economic life over the earth in a rather highly special- 
ized manner, the approach is largely through a study of 
commodities and industries. Each student is expected to 
present a creditable paper on some commodity or indus- 
try, suitably illustrated with original maps, pictures, and 
appropriate graphs. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Brooks, Mr. Cameron, Miss Grogan, Mr. Johnson, 
Mr. Porter, Miss Stallings, Miss Steed 

Courses are offered under the supervision of this de- 
partment to meet the needs of certification in all fields of 
public school teaching and to prepare students who wish 
to become teachers of Health or of Physical Education. 
The department also offers an opportunity to all students 
to learn how to maintain themselves in physical well- 
being and health. The departments of Science and Home 
Economics co-operate in supplying the basic courses in 
anatomy, physiology, nutrition and chemistry. 

HEALTH 

1. Personal Hygiene. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

The study of hygiene as a means of improving and con- 
serving health and efficiency. 

Lectures and class discussions on the relation of diet, 
exercise, sleep, bathing, clothing, etc., to our daily lives. 

2. Health Principles and Practices. 

Winter quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

A discussion of the principles and practices of individual 

health is given. 

Open to all students. 



126 East Carolina Teachers College 

3. Individual Health Problems. 

Spring term. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This is a study of individual health problems as they affect 
the individual's efficiency. 
Open to all students. 

105. School and Community Hygiene. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This is a study of hygiene as applied to school and com- 
munity activities. This includes the care of the buildings 
and grounds, water supply, control of epidemics, proper 
heating and ventilation of buildings, and inspection of 
foods. 

223. Methods and Materials in Health Education for 
Secondary Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a study of some practical principles of health edu- 
cation designed for application in secondary schools. Spe- 
cial reference is made to sources of materials available 
to health instruction. 

Emphasis is placed on the planning of well integrated 
units for personal and community health study. 

225. Safety Education and First Aid. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Methods of caring for injuries and applying first aid to 
the injured, together with methods of preventing injuries 
and accidents form the basis of this course. 
Demonstrated by the students. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

240. Principles of Health and Physical Education for 
Elementary Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with a study of the basis for health edu- 
cation and physical education in modern society and a 
consideration of the physiological, psychological and so- 
ciological principles to be followed in order to make an 
intelligent selection and use of health and physical edu- 
cation activities in the elementary school. 

244. Practices and Procedures in Health for Elementary 
Schools. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



Courses of Instruction 127 

This course deals with the current practices in health 
education for elementary schools, and gives a survey of 
the materials available for teaching health to children of 
the elementary school level. 

317. Principles of Health and Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with a study of the basis for health 
education and physical education in modern society and 
a consideration of the physiological, psychological and 
sociological principles to be followed in order to make 
an intelligent selection and use of health and physical 
education activities in the secondary school. 
Open only to majors in physical education. 
Prerequisites: Physical Education 17 and Science 106, 
107 and 113. 

360G. Child Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a study of the child from infancy through the suc- 
ceeding periods of growth and development. Special 
emphasis is given to the pre-school child and early adjust- 
ments of the school child. 

365G. School and Community Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a study of the activities involved in maintaining 
and improving school and community health. Special 
emphasis is placed on milk supply, communicable dis- 
eases, food inspection, water supply and sewage disposal. 
Students make field trips to observe various public health 
activities. 

399. Nurses' Aid Training. 

One lecture and four hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Practical laboratory work in the college infirmary, the 

local hospital, or with county nurses. Admission to the 

class only by permission of the teacher. 



128 East Carolina Teachers College 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two gymnasium suits are required of every student 
taking Physical Education. These may be bought at the 
Stationery Room after entering College. 

1. Introduction to Physical Education. 

Three hours a week each quarter. Credit: one quarter 
hour. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with 
the health, recreational and educational potentialities of 
Physical Education as it applies to present-day educa- 
tional practices. 
Open to all students. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

2. Fundamentals of Rhythmic Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course includes the study of rhythms, singing games, 
and similar activities that are generally adapted to train- 
ing in rhythmics. Open to all students. 

3. Games of Low Organization. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Open to Primary and Grammar Grade students. 

4. Games of High Organization. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Open to Primary and Grammar Grade students. 

5. Fundamentals of Body Mechanics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This is a study of the body mechanics as required for a 
proper understanding of the mechanics involved in sports 
and physical activities. Open to all students. 

13. Speedball and Soccer. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course deals with the fundamental techniques of 
speedball and soccer as team games. Emphasis is placed 
upon a mastery of the fundamentals. 

14. Elementary Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course deals with the fundamental techniques of bas- 
ketball. 
Emphasis is placed upon a mastery of the fundamentals. 



Courses of Instruction 129 

15. Softball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

This course covers softball fundamentals, team play and 

officiating. 

17. Introduction to Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The object of this course is to familiarize the student with 
the health, recreational, and educational potentialities of 
Physical Education as it applies to present-day educa- 
tional practices. 
Open only to majors and minors in Physical Education. 

21. Fundamentals of Tennis. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The object of this course is to familiarize the student with 
the fundamentals and elementary principles underlying 
tennis as a recreational and competitive game. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

23. Large Group Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Calisthenics, marching, and mass games are presented 
which will provide the student with teaching material 
and methods of organizing and conducting large groups. 
Activities requiring limited equipment will be stressed. 

24. Elementary Field Hockey. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Fundamentals of field hockey are stressed and a playing 
knowledge of the game taught together with the elemen- 
tary coaching points. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

25. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is open to those students who are restricted in 
their activities and where instruction in a program of 
activities adapted to their particular needs is indicated. 
The course is designed especially for underweight, over- 
weight, posture, heart, foot, kidney, post-operative, and 
paralysis cases. 

26. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 25. 



130 East Carolina Teachers College 

27. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 26. 

28. Elementary Football. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the individual 

with the fundamental essentials of football. 

31. Boxing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with 

the fundamentals of boxing. 

32. Wrestling. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The simpler holds used in intercollegiate and inter- 
scholastic wrestling are taught. Ring strategy and condi- 
tioning drills form a part of the required work. 

41. Tumbling and Self -Testing Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student 
with those activities that can be performed individually, 
or in groups, and in such a manner that the student can 
organize and measure progress without the use of elab- 
orate equipment or direction. 

104. Archery. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student 
with the techniques of archery, clout and target shooting, 
and the care and repair of equipment is stressed. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

105. Recreational Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with 
various games of popular recreational nature, such as 
croquet, badminton, aerial darts, shuffleboard, quoits, 
deck, tennis, paddle tennis, tetherball, box hockey, volley- 
ball, horseshoes, and table tennis. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



Courses of Instruction 131 

107. Clog and Character Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The fundamental steps and simpler routines of clog, tap, 

and character dancing form the basis of this course. 

111. Social Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

An introduction to the elementary steps and techniques 

social dancing. 

112. Folk Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

This course is planned to acquaint the student with the 

fundamental skills of folk and national dances. 

114. The Coaching of Baseball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The mastery of the essential techniques and coaching pro- 
cedures of baseball. Field drills and a study of modern 
methods of teaching game skills form the basis of this 
course. Motion pictures are used as supplementary ma- 
terials. Officiating in intramural games is required. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

121. Advanced Tennis. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A course stressing the playing techniques and skills such 
as are required of advanced players. A playing knowledge 
and fair degree of skill are prerequisites to this course. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

127. Playground and Communinty Recreation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The management and conduct of school and community 
playgrounds and the problems involved in such admin- 
istration form the basis of this course. Large school and 
community playgrounds are visited and their work ob- 
served. 

134. Club Leadership. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The organization and conduct of Boy Scout, Girl Scout, 
Camp Fire Girls, and Four-H Club Work. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



132 East Carolina Teachers College 

135. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 27. 

136. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 135. 

137. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 136. 

210. The Coaching of Track and Field Athletics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 

The coaching fundamentals, individual techniques, and 

conditioning activities pertaining to the teaching and 

coaching of interscholastic track and field athletics are 

the major aims of this course. Motion pictures are used as 

supplementary material for the course. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

211. The Coaching of Football. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 

The coaching fundamentals, individual techniques, and 

conditioning activities pertaining to the teaching and 

coaching of high school football are the major aims of 

this course. Motion pictures are used as supplementary 

material for the course. Officiating in intramural games 

is required. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 28. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

212. The Coaching of Girls' Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to present the fundamental 
coaching and teaching procedures of girls' basketball. 
Mastery of game techniques is required. All students are 
required to officiate in games and aid in carrying on of 
intramural basketball activities. Motion pictures are used 
as supplementary material for the course. 
Prerequisite: Physical Education 14. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

213. The Coaching of Boys' Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 

This course aims to present the fundamental coaching and 



Courses of Instruction 133 

teaching procedures of boy's basketball. Mastery of game 
techniques is required. Motion pictures are used as sup- 
plementary material for the course. Officiating in intra- 
mural games is required. 
Prerequisite: Physical Education 14. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

223. Methods of Teaching Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Methods of teaching Physical Education in the public 
schools. The state and proposed national objectives, 
aims, and requirements are brought before the students. 
The handling of public school groups under varying 
conditions is stressed. 

245. Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for 
Elementary Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the 
practices and procedures used in the teaching of physical 
education in the elementary school. 

301G. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A thorough study and an analysis of the various tech- 
niques and procedures as used in physical education for 
diagnostic, promotion, and rating purposes. 

302. The Organization, Administration and Supervision 
of Health and Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the problems of organization and administra- 
tion of health and physical education on the various 
school levels. Teacher load, program planning, grading, 
and promotion are discussed. The duties of the super- 
visor and his relationship to the various administrative 
groups are studied. 

306. The Theory of Remedial Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A thorough study of the various common remedial defects 

with suggestions for their correction. 

307G. The History of Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the historical development and growth of the 



■1 



134 East Carolina Teachers College 

physical education movement from 1800 to present. The 
different phases of the physical education movement are 
studied in relation to their part in general educational 
trends. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve quarter hours. 
Observation and practice teaching in Health Education, 
Physical Education, and Recreation. 
Credited as Education 324. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Bloxton, Miss Gaut, Miss Lacy, Miss McGee, 
Miss Osborn, Miss Poindexter, Miss Usry 

The Home Economics Department is recognized by and 
receives assistance from the Federal Government as a 
center for the training of vocational teachers of Home 
Economics. Sequences of courses may be adjusted to 
prepare a student for homemaking; for work in child 
care centers; and for interneship in hospitals approved 
by the American Dietetics Association. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

8. Textiles. 

Two lectures and two laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Consideration of textile fibers and fabrics from the view- 
point of the consumer; characteristics, manufacture, and 
uses; simple analyses and home tests. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

9. Clothing Selection and Construction. 

One lecture and four laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

The practical application of basic construction techniques, 

principles of selection, care and conservation of clothing. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 8. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

101. Clothing Clinic. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for those not majoring in home economics. 
How to plan, purchase, and care for a satisfactory ward- 
robe. 



Courses of Instruction 135 

117. Clothing Selection and Construction. 

One lecture and four laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

More advanced techniques in clothing construction; ex- 
perience in handling different types of fabrics and gar- 
ments; pattern adaptation. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 8. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

215. History of Costume. 

Three lectures a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of some of the important periods of costume and 
their relationship to modern dress. Emphasis is placed 
on the social, political, and economic conditions reflected 
in the styles of each period. 

227. Advanced Clothing Construction. 

One lecture and four laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Skills and techniques of clothing construction developed 

through problems in tailoring. Budgeting applied to the 

planning of a wardrobe. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 117. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

2. Elementary Foods. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 

This course deals with the composition, selection, and 

preparation of everyday foods. All preparation of food 

is done on a meal basis in unit kitchens. Students are 

given opportunity to use electricity, gas, and kerosene 

as fuels. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

105. Elementary Nutrition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Open to any student. 

A first course in nutrition to assist students in selecting 
adequate meals. 



136 East Carolina Teachers College 

110. Foods. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 

This course includes the selection of food as to quality, 

nutritive value, and cost; the preparation and serving of 

meals for different occasions. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

220. School Lunchroom Management. 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to develop an appreciation for 
and knowledge of child feeding as it functions in the 
school cafeteria, and to gain skill in the operation of a 
school cafeteria. Practical experience is gained through 
participation in the activities of the Training School 
Lunchroom. 

224. Survey of Cookery. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course consists of the preparation of various types of 
foods, the testing of standard recipes and their variations. 
The planning, marketing, preparing, and serving of nu- 
tritious and attractive meals are emphasized. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

225. Nutrition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
In this course the essentials of an adequate diet, the food 
needs for different ages and occupations, and the nutritive 
value of food materials are studied. Students make their 
menus, according to shares, in this class to use in the 
Home Management House. 

Prerequisites: Science 207, Science 231, Home Economics 
224. 

314. Food Preservation. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the different methods of home preservation of 
foods. Intensive practical work in canning, dehydration, 
preserving, pickling and jelly making is given. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 224, Science 310. 



Courses of Instruction 137 

325. Nutrition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective for home economics and science majors. 
This course is a continuation of Home Economics 225. 
The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the 
work that is now being done in the field of nutrition, and 
to make practical application of this information. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 225, Science 309. 

328. Nutrition in Disease. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective for home economics and science majors who have 
had the necessary prerequisites. This course deals with 
the food requirements of people suffering from the more 
common diseases that are found in the average hospital, 
as well as disorders due to inadequate diets that may be 
corrected at home. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 325. 

329. Institutional Management. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is offered for those who are planning to 
work with institutional foods. It deals with the use of 
institutional equipment in the college kitchen; the buying 
of food in large quantities; storage of staple foods; and 
the use of the cold storage plant. Management of em- 
ployees and serving are also emphasized. 

335. Neighborhood Nutrition. 

Two hours a week and field work. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Elective for students who have the necessary prerequi- 
sites. Practical experience, under guidance, in serving 
private and public welfare agencies. Studying the needs 
of one's own community with a view to taking an active 
part in promoting better nutrition are the aims of this 
course. Field work is required. 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

104. Home Nursing and Health of the Family. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of the hygienic measures 
recommended for the home and community. Practical 
experiences in care of the sick are provided. 



138 East Carolina Teachers College 

126. Household Furnishings. 

Three lectures a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of furnishings for homes of varying incomes. 
Emphasis is placed upon the application of art principles 
and desirable qualities in merchandise for the home. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 8 and Art 15. 

127. Housing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
The study of modern housing from the social, economic 
and artistic standpoints. Standards for housing and their 
relation to desirable home life are considered. 

219. Household Management. 

Two lecture periods and two laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all students who major in home economics. 

This course is prerequisite to the residence in the Home 

Management House. 

Such topics as budgeting of time and money, laborsaving 

equipment, factors that constitute household managerial 

ability and how these are maintained under different 

social and economic situations are stressed. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

226. Consumer Education. 

Three lectures a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Market organization and practices; standardization, label- 
ing, and branding of commodities; consumer problems 
related to certain articles of clothing, household fabrics 
and non-textile merchandise. 
Prerequisite: Economics 110. 

319. Home Management House. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Unit I. A group of not more than six seniors live in a 
modern house, under the supervision of an instructor, for 
a period of nine weeks. This course aims to develop ideals 
and standards of good living. 

Unit II. A group of four seniors live in an apartment, 
simply furnished, on a lower income level than Unit I. 
Units I and II are housed in the same building and are 
run simultaneously. Opportunity is given for each stu- 
dent to have experience in both units. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 219, 224, 225. 



Courses of Instruction 139 

THE CHILD 

230. Child Development. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course considers the care of the mother before the 
birth of a child as well as the care of an infant during and 
after birth. A study is also made of the food, clothing, 
and nursery needs of the child. Good physical, mental, 
social, and emotional development as it is affected by 
home environment is considered. Observation is made of 
the development of children in the nursery school. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 103 and Science 231. 

231. Practicum in Child Guidance. 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course gives the student an opportunity to learn 
about children by working with the nursery school chil- 
dren. 

It also furnishes some opportunity to work with the par- 
ents of young children. It is taken only in conjunction 
with Home Economics 330. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

330. Child Guidance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course considers the fundamentals of child behavior 
and guidance. The varying circumstances and activities 
which surround the normal growth of children are pre- 
sented through observation, discussion and reading. The 
course is taken only in conjunction with Home Economics 
231. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 230. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

7. Problems of College Freshmen. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Open to all students. 

This is a brief survey course the aim of which is to help 
freshmen adjust themselves to college life, and to see 
home economics in the broad aspect of personal living. 
Topics discussed are time management, personal finance, 
personality and social adjustment, etiquette, the college 



140 East Carolina Teachers College 

room, food selection and health habits, grooming, care of 
clothing, dress selection and vocational and professional 
opportunities for the home economist. 

223. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
An application of the fundamentals of education to home 
economics instruction. The selection of problems, their 
presentation, and the use of objective materials is con- 
sidered. Visits to home economics departments and ob- 
servations of classes are made. 

N / 

228. The Teaching of Foods in Secondary Schools. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course aims to give students simple and fundamental 
principles of cookery and nutrition which can be applied 
in the teaching of foods in high schools throughout the 
state. 

323. Vocational Home Economics Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Consideration is given to development of home economics 
in state and national programs of vocational education, 
to requirements and qualifications of vocational home 
economics teachers, to approved methods in home project 
supervision, teaching boys' classes, third year home eco- 
nomics, and adult or other out-of-school groups. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 223. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

Every quarter. Eighteen hours a week for twelve weeks. 
Credit: twelve quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Observation and participation in the vocational home 
economics program of the Greenville and other High 
Schools in Pitt and surrounding counties. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Mr. Powell 

11. Mechanical Drawing I. 

Fall quarter. Six hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Open to students in any department. 



Courses of Instruction 141 

The use and care of drawing equipment, lettering, projec- 
tions, sections, pictorial drawing, and an introduction to 
machine drawing. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

12. Mechanical Drawing II. 

Winter quarter. Six hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A continuation of Mechanical Drawing I. Lettering, 

auxiliary projections, revolutions, machine drawing, sheet 

metal developments, tracing, and blueprinting. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

20. Descriptive Geometry. 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Fundamental principles of descriptive geometry and their 

application to problems of engineering. Lectures and 

drafting. 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Drawing I and II. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

21. Woodworking I. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A basic course in woodworking which includes the study 
of common cabinet and construction woods, hand tools, 
joints, glues, and methods of wood finishing. The labora- 
tory work consists of planning and construction of proj- 
ects which illustrate various methods of wood fabrication. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

22. Woodworking II. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Emphasis is placed upon the care and operation of wood- 
working machinery. A study is made of the decorative 
processes, veneering, methods of cabinet construction, 
and house framing. The laboratory work consists of plan- 
ning and construction of projects of cabinet type. 
Prerequisite: Woodworking I. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

111. Sheet Metal Developments. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 



142 East Carolina Teachers College 

A drawing course consisting of the surface development 
of various forms common to the sheet metal trade. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

112. Shop Sketching. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

The development of a technique in presentation of forms 
and ideas familiar to engineers and industry by free- 
hand sketches. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

122. Sheet Metal. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Laboratory work consisting of cutting, forming, seaming, 
soldering, riveting, and decorating sheet metals. 
The lecture discussions deal with mining and with meth- 
ods of manufacturing sheet metals, solders, fluxes, and 
rivets. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

140. Industrial Design. 

Every quarter. Six hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Organized to help students gain insights into the ma- 
terials, processes, and products of industry. 
The planning and construction of projects in wood, metal, 
leather, plastics and weaving. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

211. Architectural Drawing. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course deals with the design and construction of 
small houses. Visitation to study design and building 
methods. A review of the world's foremost architecture 
and architects. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

245. Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A practical course in the use of tools and materials. Its 
purpose is the understanding of a valuable medium for 



Courses of Instruction 143 

the child's creative expression. All procedures are closely 
allied with the activities of the elementary school. The 
planning and construction of projects suitable to the 
elementary curriculum. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

246. Art Metalwork. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Course open to students in any department. Laboratory 
work in the development of art metal projects in alum- 
inum, copper, pewter, brass, and silver. Lecture dis- 
cussions deal with design and with the commercial manu- 
facture of art metal projects. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Mr. Smiley, Miss Walker 

210. School Libraries. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a survey course of the importance and functions of 
the school library in modern education including the or- 
ganization and administration of such libraries. It is 
intended for the administrator, teacher and teacher- 
librarian. 

211. School Libraries. 

One recitation and eight hours of library work a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

A continuation of Library Science 210. 

Prerequisite: Library Science 210. 

218. Principles of Book Selection. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The object of this course is to cultivate the ability to 
select the literature best adapted to the varying need of 
the pupil through a study of the underlying principles 
and practices of approved methods. The work consists 
of reading, examining and reviewing selected books from 
classes such as literature, history, science, fiction, etc.; 
a critical study of the principle aids to book selection as 
tools for practical use in the library; the compiling of 
selected lists; practice in the writing of book notes; the 
checking of current book lists; discussion of American 
publishers; and study of editions. Lectures and discussion 
groups. 



144 East Carolina Teachers College 

220. Book Selection. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course in the selection and evaluation of books for the 
elementary school library, use of various aids, and the 
examination and reading of books for young people with 
emphasis on the requirements of the North Carolina 
course of study. 

222. Book Selection. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course in book selection for the high school library, in- 
cluding the various lists and other aids, the examination 
of suitable titles, both classic and modern, and a study 
of the reading needs of high school students. 

231-232. Cataloging and Classification. 

Three hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours 
each. 

The objectives of these courses are to teach students (1) 
to classify and assign subject headings to school library 
materials, (2) to write bibliographic data — e. g. authors' 
names — in correct form, (3) to make and maintain a 
catalog and a shelf list, including the correct filing of 
cards in each, and (4) to order printed catalog cards. 
The work will be carried on through class discussion, 
projects, and laboratory work. 231 is a prerequisite of 
232. 

301. Reference and Bibliography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the 
principles of reference work and with the selection and 
use of basic bibliographic and reference books, public 
documents, periodicals, and periodical indexes. Exten- 
sive practice is given in the selection of reference and 
bibliographic materials for school libraries. 

302. Reference and Bibliography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A continuation of Library Science 301. 
Prerequisite: Library Science 301. 



Courses of Instruction 145 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Brown, Mrs. Brown, Miss Caldwell, Miss Williams 

20. Descriptive Geometry. (Same as Ind. Arts 20) 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Fundamental principles of descriptive geometry and their 

application to problems of engineering. Lectures and 

drafting. 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Drawing I and II. 

42. Arithmetic for Elementary Majors. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. 

This course is designed to develop speed and accuracy 

in computation with whole numbers and both decimal 

and common fractions, and the ability to analyze and 

solve problems that the intelligent citizen meets in the 

home and business. 

54. Social and Economic Mathematics. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of high school majors. 

This course is designed to develop accuracy and facility 
in computation, and to give a knowledge of some im- 
portant phases of mathematics which are needed in 
everyday life. 

Topics included are: computation; methods of checking 
computation; percentage and its application to problems 
prevalent in our economic society; consumer buying; 
consumer credit; taxes; savings and investments. 

57, 58. Plane Trigonometry. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

The course includes the derivation and use of formulas, 
solution of the right triangle with the natural and loga- 
rithmic functions, solution of oblique triangles, functions 
of any angle, functions of two or more angles, inverse 
functions, and practical applications. 



146 East Carolina Teachers College 

59. Solid Geometry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

The course is comprised of the fundamental theorems, 
mensuration of surfaces and solids, and original exercises. 

60, 110. College Algebra. 

Spring and fall quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

A rapid review of high school algebra is given; also a 
study of systems of quadratic equations, functions, graphs, 
complex numbers, progressions, permutations and com- 
binations, probability, theory of equations, binomial 
theorem, mathematical induction, and determinants. 

121, 122. Plane Analytic Geometry. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

A study of rectangular co-ordinates, loci, the straight 
line, the circle, polar co-ordinates, conic sections, trans- 
formation of co-ordinates, higher plane curves, and an 
introduction to co-ordinate geometry in space. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, and 110. 

136. Arithmetic for Elementary Majors. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. 

The course is devoted to the study of percentage and its 

applications. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42. 

156. General Mathematics. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students except mathematics and home 
economics majors. 

The course is designed to give a general knowledge of 
some important phases of mathematics which are fre- 
quently used in social, industrial, business, and profes- 
sional life. It includes a study of formulas, graphs, time- 
rates, mathematical forms and designs, intuitive develop- 



Courses of Instruction 147 

ment of common mathematics principles, common loga- 
rithms, slide rule, trigonometry of the right triangle, 
variation, and functions. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136, or 154. 

210. Teaching of Grammar-Grade Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of grammar-grade majors. 

The course consists of a professional treatment of the 

subject matter of arithmetic for the grammar grades. 

Modern methods of teaching grammar-grade arithmetic 

are presented through a study of recent publications on 

the subject. The course also includes observations of the 

grammar grades in the laboratory school. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136. 

212. Teaching of Primary Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of primary majors. 

It is the purpose of this course to present the most modern 
methods of teaching primary arithmetic. The course con- 
sists of a study of the latest publications and courses of 
study in primary arithmetic, together with the findings 
of experimentation in the field of primary number work. 
The course also includes frequent observations in the 
laboratory school. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136. 

213, 214, 215. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

The course is devoted to the following topics: functions, 
theory of limits, differentiation, differentials, application 
of derivatives and differentials, integration, and the ap- 
plication of integrals. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 121 and 122. 

223. Teaching of Senior High School Mathematics. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A study of the teaching objectives of senior high school 
mathematics, organization of content, general and specific 
teaching techniques, testing, and the observation of 
teaching. 



148 East Carolina Teachers College 

225, 226, 227. Mathematics of Physics. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour each. 
An elementary course in solving different types of mathe- 
matical problems in general physics. This course is de- 
signed to be taken concurrently with Physics 125, 126, 
127; however, it may be taken independently by any 
qualified student. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

232, 233. College Geometry. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

The course includes a study of geometric construction, 
similar and homothetic figures; properties of the triangle 
including the circum-circle, medians, bisectors, and alti- 
tudes; transversals, harmonic properties of circles, and 
inversion. Many miscellaneous theorems and exercises 
are presented for solution. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 121 and 122. 

251. Approximate Computation. 

Spring quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter 
hour. 

Topics considered: the approximate nature of measure- 
ment; the meaning of significant figures; rounding-off 
numbers; computation with approximate numbers. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. 

261. An Introduction to Spherical Trigonometry. 

Fall quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the solution of both the right and oblique spherical 
triangles. Applications of spherical trigonometry will be 
considered. 
Prerequisite: High school or college plane trigonometry. 

271. The Slide Rule. 

Winter quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

The purpose of the course is to teach the fundamental 

principles in the use of the slide rule. The student will 

be given opportunity to practice solving problems taken 

from the field of his choice. 



Courses of Instruction 149 

272. Field Work in Mathematics. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

The purpose of the course is to teach the significance and 
the use of the slide rule, plane table, level, sextant, and 
the transit through participation in activities involving 
the utilization of these instruments. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 57 and 58, or 156. 

318. History of Elementary Mathematics. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

The course is designed to give a general view of the de- 
velopment of the elementary branches of mathematics: 
arithmetic, algebra, synthetic and analytic geometry, 
trigonometry, and calculus. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

322G. a.b.c. Laboratory Apprenticeship Mathematics. 
Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Credit: three quarter 
hours each. 
Open to mathematics majors only. 

323. Teaching of Junior High School Mathematics. 
Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

The teaching of objectives of junior high school mathe- 
matics, organization of subject matter, analysis of text- 
books, and courses of study in junior high school mathe- 
matics, general and specific teaching techniques in junior 
high school mathematics, and the observation of teaching. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

One quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 

quarter hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

325. History of Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. 

A study of the history of the development of arithmetic 

as a science and as a school subject, with special emphasis 



150 East Carolina Teachers College 

on methods and devices through the application of which 

the science of numbers has reached its present stage of 

development. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136, or 154. 

342G. Introduction to Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A first course in statistics dealing with such topics as 
measures of central tendency and variability, zero order 
correlation, norms, percentile and moment systems, 
graphic representation, simple work with frequency dis- 
tribution, and the use of tables of the normal distribution 
in simple problems. The practical applications of these 
topics will be stressed. 

355G. Social and Economic Mathematics. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Topics considered are: stocks and bonds as an investment; 
types of life insurance policies and their advantages; an- 
nuities; home-owning and methods of payment on homes; 
installment buying; and small loans. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 54. 

357G. Introduction to Modern Mathematics. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

This course presents some of the elementary problems of 
modern mathematics. Emphasis is placed on an under- 
standing of the basic concepts rather than computation. 
Such topics as the following are considered: Non-Euclide- 
an geometries; number systems; elementary geometry 
of space of four dimensions; complex and hypercomplex 
numbers. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter 

hours. 

Required of students writing theses in the field of the 

teaching of mathematics. 

425, 426S. Theory of Equations. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours each. 

A study of complex numbers, roots, geometric construe- 



Courses of Instruction 151 

tion, cubic and quartic equations, graphs, isolation of real 
roots, solution of numerical equations, determinants, and 
symmetric functions. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

432S. Differential Equations. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study of ordinary differential equations of the first and 
second orders, and their application to elementary me- 
chanics, with emphasis on geometric interpretation and 
application. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

442S. Advanced Calculus. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A study of the definite integral as a sum and its applica- 
tions, partial derivatives, development in series, and mul- 
tiple integrals. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

443S. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of co-ordinate geometry in space: the point, the 
line, the plane, surfaces of revolution, the quadric sur- 
faces. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

455. Readings and Research in the Teaching of Arith- 
metic. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study of the field of literature relating to the field of 
the teaching of arithmetic, with special emphasis on edu- 
cational research in the teaching of arithmetic. 

456. Readings and Research in the Teachings of Second- 
ary Mathematics. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A study of educational literature relating to the field of 
the teaching of secondary mathematics with special em- 
phasis on research in this field. 



152 East Carolina Teachers College 

462. Problems in Mathematics Education. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

A laboratory course designed for the study of problems 
in the field of mathematics education relative to specific 
schools or school systems in which the student is employed 
or otherwise vitally interested. 

464S. Mathematical Instruments. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the nature, significance, and utilization of cer- 
tain mathematical instruments relative to the field of 
practical applied mathematics. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

473S. Men of Mathematics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

An intensive study of the lives and contributions of certain 

eminent mathematicians. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

483. Higher Plane Curves. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the development of the equations of certain 

higher plane curves, together with a study of the nature 

and significance of these curves. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mr. Gilbert, Miss Cammack, Mr. Carter, Miss Drake, 
Miss Kuykendall, Mr. Vornholt 

The purpose of the Department of Music Education is 
threefold: 

1. To meet the needs for competent Vocal and Instrumental 
Teachers of Music in the State of North Carolina and its 
surrounding territory. This need will be met by present- 
ing, to students with a native musical talent, a complete 
and well-rounded curriculum in Music Education. 

2. To meet the music needs of students majoring in the fields 
of Elementary Education. 

3. To meet the music needs of all students who desire tc 
broaden their cultural background through the arts. 



Courses of Instruction 153 

To major in Music a student must meet the entrance 
requirements of the department. 

1. Voice. An acceptable voice and the ability to sing accur- 
ately as to pitch and rhythm. 

2. Piano. Major and minor scales. Czerny, Op. 636; Burg- 
muller, Op. 100; Hanen studies; Sonatinas by Clementi 
and Kuhlau; easier pieces of Handel, Schumann, etc. 

All music majors will be given placement examinations 
— piano, voice and talent tests — on entering college. Stu- 
dents not ready to meet the requirements in piano will 
have to take preparatory work without credit. Credit will 
be granted the quarter following the student's successful 
completion of the preparatory work. 

The requirements for graduation in piano are: Major 
and minor scales, good speed; arpeggies, triads, dominant 
sevenths, diminished sevenths. Czerny, Op. 299. Bach 
two-part inventions. Sonatas by Haydn and Mozart and 
easier Beethoven sonatas. Pieces by Grieg, Mendelssohn, 
Chopin, etc. Work in transposition, sight-reading, and 
accompanying. 

The requirements for graduation in voice are: Students 
must be able to sing acceptably in artistic fashion solo 
songs from the Classic Literature: and sing acceptably 
in an artistic manner music of the madrigal school and of 
modern composers. They must also be able to sing at 
sight in an accurate and artistic manner rote songs for 
elementary grades. 

All music majors are required to belong to one organ- 
ization each quarter throughout all four years. No credit 
can be granted for this participation. 

10. Theory. 

Fall and spring quarters. Three class recitations and two 
Laboratory hours a week. Credit: four quarter hours 
each. 

This course is designed to give the prospective teachers 
a practical knowledge of the rudiments of music through 
the music suitable for their teaching. Designed for pri- 
mary and grammar-grade majors. 



154 East Carolina Teachers College 

11 a.b.c. Theory. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Three class recitations 
and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: four quarter 
hours each. 

An introductory course in the rudiments of music ac- 
quainting the student with principles of musical notation, 
scales, chords, sight-singing, ear training, introductory 
piano, four-part writing and all principles connected with 
introductory harmony. 

These courses must be taken serially. Designed for music 
majors. 

102. Materials for Primary and Grammar Grades. 

Fall and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a wealth of 
song material for Primary and Grammar grades. This 
material is to be studied from the theoretical, as well as 
the applied approach. This course is open only to Primary 
and Grammar grade majors and should follow Music 10. 

106, 107, 108. Musical Literature and Its Historical 
Development. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours each. 

A survey of musical literature and a study of the char- 
acteristics of the various historical periods in music. A 
study of outstanding composers and examples of their 
compositions; development of vocal and instrumental 
forms; song form; Sonata Symphony; chamber music; 
opera; modern music tendencies. Open to music majors 
only. 

110 a.b.c. Theory. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of harmony including modulation, chromatic 

alterations, ornamental tones and some analysis. 

These courses must be taken serially. Required of music 

majors. 

Prerequisite: Music lie. 

202. Music Education in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A study and interpretation of rote song repertory; correc- 



Courses of Instruction 155 

tion of monotone tendencies; musical experiences of pri- 
mary children; child voice and its care; creative music; 
change from rote to note; music in its relation to the pri- 
mary school curriculum. Observation in the laboratory 
school. 
Open to primary majors only. 

202M. Music Education in the Primary and Grammar 
Grades. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study and interpretation of rote, folk and two and three 
part songs; child voice and its care; correction of mono- 
tone tendencies; change from rote to note; changing boy 
voice; rhythm with instruments and dances; introduction 
of Bass Clef; creative music; music in its relation to the 
curricula of the primary and grammar grades. Observa- 
tion and participation in the Training School. 
Open to music majors only. 

203. Music Education in the Grammar Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. Credited as Education. 

A study and selection of musical literature for grammar 
grades: Folk songs, two and three part songs, orchestral 
instruments, program selection, radio and concert; child 
voice; changing boy voice — introduction of Bass Clef — 
music in its relation to the Grammar-Grade curriculum. 
Observation in the laboratory school. 
Open to grammar majors only. 

205. Conducting. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Study of the fundamentals of choral and orchestral con- 
ducting. The techniques of the baton; theory and practical 
experiences with college organizations will be provided. 
Required of all music majors. 

209. Materials and Application in Instrumental Group 
Instruction. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 
A course offering practical application of materials for 



156 East Carolina Teachers College 

instrumental group instruction; beginning bands, or- 
chestras, and smaller instrumental combinations. 
Prerequisites: Music Ed. 11 a.b.c, 110 a.b.c, Group 44 
a.b.c, Group 46 a.b.c, and 205. 

211 a.b.c. Advanced Harmony. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

A continuation of 110 a.b.c. Form and Analysis and some 

Counterpoint will be included. 

These courses must be taken serially. 

Prerequisite: 110 a.b.c. 

223. Music Education in the Junior and Senior High 
School. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Topics: Theoretical courses for high school; history and 

appreciation; music clubs as extracurricular activities; 

chapel programs and assembly singing; applied music in 

the high school; musical tests and measurements. 

Open to music majors only. 

306. Musical Literature and Its Historical Development. 
Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A course designed for students desiring a general knowl- 
edge of musical literature. A study of musical literature, 
ancient and modern, in its relation to man; acquaintance 
with outstanding composers and their compositions; sur- 
vey of available radio and community programs; attend- 
ance at all available concerts is required. 
Not open to music majors. 

313. Instrumentation and Arranging. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter 

hours. 

Arranging for orchestra, band, and small instrumental 

groups. Instrument ranges, tone qualities, and best 

usages in orchestration. 

Principles of composition for choral and instrumental 

groups. 

Prerequisites: Music 11 a.b.c, Music 110 a.b.c. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

Every quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 
quarter hours. 



Courses of Instruction 



157 



APPLIED MUSIC— INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

Major Choice 
Piano, Voice, or Orchestra Instrument 

Courses in Applied Music are open to all college stu- 
dents. Entrance to advanced courses by examination and 
consent of the instructor. 

All individual instruction carries with it a fee of $15.00 
a quarter for two half-hour lessons a week. 

A piano practice fee of $1.00 a quarter for one hour 
practice a day will be charged students desiring the use 
of college pianos. 

Students using other college instruments will be 
charged an instrumental fee of $1.00 a quarter. 

Courses are numbered to correspond with the student's 
classification. 

For example: Seniors taking beginning piano would 
receive credit for 330 a. b. or c. 

Piano a. b. c 30-130-230-330 

Voice a. b. c 32-132-232-332 

Violin a. b. c 34-134-234-334 

Other Instruments a. b. c 36-136-236-336 



APPLIED MUSIC— GROUP INSTRUCTION 

A fee of $1.00 will be charged for all instruments fur- 
nished by the College. 



Piano Group a.b.c 


40-140-240-340 


Voice Group a.b.c 


42-142-242-342 


String Group a.b.c 


44-144-244-344 


Brass Group a.b.c 


46-146-246-346 


W. W. Group a.b.c 


48-148-248-348 


Adv. Piano Group a.b.c 


50-150-250-350 


Adv. Voice Group a.b.c 


52-152-252-352 


Women's Chorus a.b.c 


60-160-260-360 


College Choir a.b.c 


62-162-262-362 


College Band a.b.c 


64-164-264-364 


College Orchestra a.b.c 


66-166-266-366 


Vocal or Instrument 




Ensemble a.b.c 


70-170-270-370 



158 East Carolina Teachers College 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Adams, Miss Charlton, Mr. Haynes, Miss Newell 

103. General Psychology. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students taking four-year courses. 
Aim: To provide for the student a course in the general 
principles of psychology. 

Topics: The nervous system; sense organs; organs of re- 
sponse; inherited modes of behavior such as reflexes, in- 
stincts, emotions, feelings, sensation, attention, intelli- 
gence; individual differences. 

201. Psychology of Childhood. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all primary and grammar-grade majors. 
The object of this course is the observation of and the 
reading about children at different age-levels in order that 
the child may be studied as a living, growing organism 
like, yet different from, other individuals. Emphasis 
throughout the course will be placed on mental hygiene 
and its place in the development of a well-integrated per- 
sonality. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

204. Educational Tests and Measurements. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students preparing to be grammar-grade 
teachers. 

Aim: To acquaint the student with educational tests and 
the uses of these tests. 

Topics: Titles, publisher, structure, giving, scoring, tabu- 
lating results, interpreting results; and test uses in grad- 
ing, classifying, and promoting students. 

205. Educational Psychology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisites: General psychology and at least sopho- 
more standing. 

Topics: How to study; intelligence, intelligence testing 
and the uses of intelligence test scores; educational tests, 
the general principles of learning; optimal conditions for 



Courses of Instruction 159 

learning; the learning curve; class experiments in learn- 
ing processes; transfer of learning; the biological antece- 
dents of learning; mental hygiene; and conditions and 
causes of maladjustment. 

270. Mental Hygiene in the School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned as a part of the professional train- 
ing of the teacher in the elementary and high schools. 
Two fundamental considerations are treated. First, the 
mental and social problems of the teacher. Second, men- 
tal hygiene training for children as a function of the 
school. 

Topics: The meaning and development of the wholesome 
and effective personality for both the teacher and the 
pupil. Poor adjustments in school, disciplinary problems, 
remedial work, and the effect of special educational meth- 
ods in the light of psychological and genetic principles. 
The relation between the school and the home is given 
correlative though subordinate consideration. 

308. Psychology of Elementary School Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Required of juniors and seniors working for primary or 
grammar certificate. 

A study of the psychological principles underlying the 
teaching and learning of the elementary school subjects. 
Emphasis is placed on the modern methods of handling 
this material as a result of more recent investigations and 
research in the field. 

309. High School Tests. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Required of all students preparing to be high school 
teachers. 

Aim: To acquaint the student with high school tests. 
Topics: Development of test movement, aims of tests, 
giving tests, scoring tests; and the uses of test results in 
grading, classifying, and promoting students. 

312. Psychology of Secondary School Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Aim: To give the student an opportunity to study the 



160 East Carolina Teachers College 

psychological principles underlying the teaching and 
learning of the high school subject. 

Topics: Certain high school subjects, the choice to suit 
the group taking the course. 

315, 316, 317, 31 8G. Problems in Mental Testing. 

These are one-credit courses. Any quarter on demand for 
individual students. 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and credit in 
Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

Unit one: In this unit the student becomes familiar with 
the materials of the Revised Stanford-Binet Scales; learns 
something of the history of its development; becomes ac- 
quainted with the technique of giving this test; and ad- 
ministers it to at least six individuals independent of 
assistance. 

Unit two: To meet the requirements of this unit the stu- 
dent must satisfactorily administer the Binet Intelligence 
Scale to at least ten children and make reports of these 
testings showing analyses, and interpretations of results. 
Unit three: In this unit the student is given opportunity 
to administer, evaluate, and interpret the results of group 
intelligence tests. 

Unit four: A study of the history of intelligence testing. 
Other units will be offered as demand arises. The satis- 
factory completion of any one unit will get one hour 
credit. 

340G. Psychology of Adolescence. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
This course is intended to make a study of pre-adolescence 
and adolescence. Behavioristic changes that are concomi- 
tant with the physiological changes of adolescence; their 
meaning and treatment in education training; social insti- 
tutions designed to meet these changes, such as Boy Scouts 
and Campfire Girls, are some of the topics given con- 
sideration. 

350G. Psychology of Reading in the Elementary School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
For seniors working for primary or grammar-grade Class 
A certificate. 

Aim: To give the student an opportunity to study the psy- 
chological principles underlying the teaching and learn- 
ing of reading. 



Courses of Instruction 161 

Topics: Bringing about a readiness to read; teaching and 
learning how to read; skills essential for reading to learn; 
schoolroom diagnosis of reading difficulties; and remedial 
work on all levels. 

401S. Psychology of Childhood. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Aim: To treat such topics as the original nature of the 
child, individual differences, discipline, brightness, dull- 
ness, and mental, social, and educational adjustment of 
the child. 

A study of the investigations in this field will be con- 
ducted. 

421. Social Psychology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology, including 103. 
In this course a study is made of the innate tendencies 
that are stimulated by other beings and their behavior. 
Also the organization of group attitudes, such as co-opera- 
tion, opposition, etc., and group habits, customs, language, 
and imitation. 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Brandt, Miss Caughey, Mr. Derrick, 
Mrs. Picklesimer, Miss Wilton 

BIOLOGY 

23, 24, 25. Elements of Biology. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and two 
hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours each. 

These are courses in practical biology intended to ac- 
quaint the student with the biological principles concern- 
ing man and his environment. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

106, 107. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three lectures a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours a quarter. 
These courses consist of lectures and demonstrations by 
means of models and prepared dissections. The relation 
of structure to function in the human is stressed. 



162 East Carolina Teachers College 

111. Zoology (Invertebrate). 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 

work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

A survey of the invertebrates with a detailed study of 

representative forms. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

112. Zoology (Vertebrate). 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labor- 
atory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of the simpler chordate ani- 
mals, a study of a representative series of vertebrate ani- 
mals, and the detailed study of one mammal. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

130. General Botany. 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
A survey of the plant kingdom from the Thallophytes 
through the Gymnosperms with a detailed study of the 
structure, reproduction, life history, and economic im- 
portance of selected types. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

131. General Botany. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
A study of the structure, growth, physiology, and eco- 
nomic importance of seed plants. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

132. Field Botany. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
A study of plants in their natural habitats. Emphasis will 
be placed upon identification of species and a study of 
the environmental factors involved in plant associations. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

140. Field Zoology. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work or field 
excursions a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
This course is planned to develop an intelligent field 
knowledge of Eastern North Carolina animals in order 
that teachers may make better use of the environment 



Courses of Instruction 163 

in teaching. Excursions to typical habitats for the pur- 
pose of collecting and identifying animals and studying 
the ecological conditions under which they live. 
Prerequisite: A year of biology or equivalent. 

206. Nature Study. 

Fall and spring quarters. Four hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

A study is made of the common flowers, trees, insects, 

birds, and other animals. 

Nature literature and field work supplement the lectures. 

220a.b.c. Biological Preparations. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Six hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Elective. 

This course is designed to give the students experience in 

the preparation of biological specimens, museum work, 

and visual aids. 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

231. Human Physiology. 

Each quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
A study of circulation, respiration, digestion, metabolism, 
excretion, and related processes. 

Prerequisite: Science 23, 24 and either one year of chem- 
istry or Science 106 and 107. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

305G. Plant Ecology. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
Field study of local plant communities from the stand- 
point of environment and its controlling factors. 
Prerequisites: Biology 23, 24, 25 and Botany 130, 131 or 
their equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

310G. Bacteriology. 

Fall and winter quarters. Two lectures and four hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of yeasts, molds, and bac- 
teria with special emphasis upon bacteria in their more 
intimate relations to man. 



164 East Carolina Teachers College 

Prerequisites: 18 hours of science including Biology 23, 
24; Chemistry 44, 45, and 46; and Chemistry 207 strongly 
recommended. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

325G. Animal Ecology. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

A study of the relationships of animals to each other, to 

plants and to physical factors in their environments. 

Prerequisite: A year of biology. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

330G. Heredity. 

Spring quarter. Three hours of lecture a week and two 
hours of laboratory work a week optional. Credit: three 
or four quarter hours. 

A study of the laws of heredity and their applications in 
evolution and eugenics. The laboratory work includes 
experiments with the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. 
Prerequisites: Biology 23, 24, 25, or their equivalent or 
consent of instructor. 

335. Plant Identification. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 

work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

Field observation, collection, identification and taxonomy 

of the higher groups of plants of Eastern North Carolina. 

Prerequisite: A year of biology. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

350G. Histology. 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
Slides of plant and animal tissues are prepared. Students 
learn to identify plant and animal tissues from these 
slides. Students are given the opportunity to prepare a 
collection of slides for their own use. 
Prerequisite: At least two years of college biology. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

406. Embryology. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
The early development of the vertebrates is studied, in- 
cluding the formation of the systems of organs. The de- 



Courses of Instruction 165 

velopment of some one vertebrate is studied in the labora- 
tory. Slides showing this development are prepared by 
the students. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college biology. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

408. Plant Anatomy and Morphology. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
A study of the origin and development of structures 
found in vascular plants. A study of both prepared slides 
and fresh materials which the student will prepare in the 
laboratory. 

Prerequisites: Biology 23, 24, 25 and Botany 130, 131 or 
their equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

450a.b.c. Special Problems in Biology. 

Hours to be arranged. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Individual and group study and investigation of special 

problems in biology by graduate students possessing the 

necessary qualifications. 

Prerequisites will vary somewhat with the problem 

selected. 

CHEMISTRY 

44, 45, 46. General Chemistry. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Two lectures and four 

hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter 

hours each. 

These courses are designed for students who wish to gain 

a broad knowledge of the more interesting phases of the 

subject. Recommended for students who plan to teach in 

secondary schools. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 a quarter and breakage. 

120. Semi-Micro Qualitative Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. 
Credit: four quarter hours. 

The analysis of simple ores, alloys, and industrial prod- 
ucts. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 



166 East Carolina Teachers College 

121. Gravimetric Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

Introduction to gravimetric methods of analysis, together 

with advanced work in stoichiometry. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

122. Volumetric Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

Presentation of volumetric methods of analysis, and the 

underlying theory. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

207, 208, 209. Organic Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four 

hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter 

hours each. 

These courses include a study of the principal compounds 

of both the aliphatic and the aromatic series, emphasizing 

those compounds which relate to foods, fuels, and other 

household uses. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 a quarter and breakage. 

309G. Physiological Chemistry. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
Elective. 

This course includes a study of the body processes of res- 
piration, circulation, digestion, absorption, metabolism, 
excretion, and coordination. Designed especially for home 
economics students but open to all who have had the 
necessary prerequisites. 

Prerequisites: 18 hours of science including chemistry 
and human physiology. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

312. Food Chemistry. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
Elective. 

A course designed to accompany a more advanced study 
of foods. Food classification, analysis, detection of adul- 
terants, and tests for the detection of specific foods. 



Courses of Instruction 167 

Open to graduate students and seniors only. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

Prerequisite: 24 hours of science including organic chem- 
istry. 

331, 332, 333G. Physical Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three lectures a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Introduction to theoretical chemistry including the funda- 
mental laws and concepts. 
Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

PHYSICS 

115, 116, 117. Household Physics. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and two 
hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours each. 

A study of laboratory projects in physics with special ap- 
plication to household uses, emphasis being placed on the 
study of heating systems, electrical appliances in the 
home, water supply, illumination, heat conduction, etc. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

125, 126, 127. General Physics. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three lectures and two 

hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter 

hours each. 

Courses of lectures, recitations, and individual laboratory 

work covering the divisions of mechanics, heat, light, 

sound, magnetism, and electricity. 

The purpose of the courses is to acquaint the student with 

physical terms and quantities and an appreciation of the 

laws that underlie physical science. 

Prerequisite: Math. 57, 60. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

180. Physics — Sound. 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and two hours laboratory work 

a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

An elementary course in physics for music students. This 

course deals with the scientific principles of musical 

sounds, acoustics, and the mathematical basis of scale 

formation. 

Open to music majors only. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



168 East Carolina Teachers College 

225. Mechanics. 

Three lectures and two hours of laboratory work per 

week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course deals with the theory and applications of 

mechanics. 

Prerequisite: One year of general physics. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

226. Heat. 

Three lectures and two hours of laboratory work a week. 
Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course includes a study of thermometry, change of 
state, specific heat, and introduction to thermodynamics. 
Prerequisite: One year of general physics. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

227. Light and Sound. 

Three lectures and two hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course gives a thorough treatment of the elements 

of light and sound. 

Prerequisite: One year of general physics. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

317G. Electricity. 

Three lectures and two hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

This is an advance course in the theory and applications 

of direct and alternating current electricity. 

Prerequisite: A year of general physics. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

171, 172, 173. General Science. 

Fall, winter and spring quarters. Two lectures and two 
hours demonstration work a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A survey course in general science designed to meet the 
needs of (1) those students who desire a fundamental 
knowledge of scientific principles, and (2) for those plan- 
ning to teach in the grammar grades. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



Courses of Instruction 169 

200. Mineralogy. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course includes a study of the more common min- 
erals. Emphasis is placed on the commercial use of min- 
erals in everyday life. 
Open to students of sophomore or junior standing. 

315G. Elementary Science 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the elementary 
teacher with the content and method of presentation of 
elementary science from grades one through seven. It 
includes an introduction to the state course of study and 
lays particular stress on continuity of subject matter. 

316. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This course includes a descriptive study of the heavenly 

bodies and their relation to man and his daily activities. 

This course is open to all students of junior standing. 

318. Elements of Photography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A thoroughly scientific course designed to meet the de- 
sires of those students who wish a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the scientific background and the fundamental 
techniques of photography which they will be able to put 
to practical use. 

322a.b.c. Apprenticeship Science. 

Pall, winter, and spring quarters. Credit: three quarter 

hours each. 

Open to science majors of junior or senior standing. 

405a. b.c. Science for the Elementary School Teacher. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A content course for teachers who wish to improve their 

background for teaching science in the elementary 

schools. 

Topics selected for study will be based on the needs of 

the group. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 



170 East Carolina Teachers College 

410. Contemporary Science. 

Fall, winter or spring quarter. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions concerning 

the development of scientific thought with emphasis on 

recent advances. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college science. 

420a.b.c. Investigations in Elementary Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
A course designed to offer opportunities for special in- 
vestigations in the field of elementary science. 

455. Experimental Evaluations in Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the evaluation of science texts and 
reference material; classroom and laboratory equipment; 
and the coordination of the various sciences. 

465. Current Problems in Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the current investigations in 
science; critical evaluations of techniques, materials, 
results, and conclusions. 

475. Historical Development of School Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course traces the development of the study of science 
from its early stages to the present time. Special em- 
phasis is placed upon the development of the present-day 
secondary school sciences. 

480. Advanced Problems in the Physical Sciences. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the fusion of chemistry and physics 
as experienced in natural settings. Many demonstrations 
are included. 

485. The Lives and Works of Great Men of Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the development of science as por- 
trayed by the contributions of noted scientists. The pri- 
vate lives and environments of these individuals will be 
stressed. 



Courses of Instruction 171 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

223. Materials and Methods in Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and class 
discussions on the materials and methods used in the 
teaching of science in the senior high school. 

324. Observation and Student Teaching. 

One quarter. Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve 
quarter hours. 

400a.b.c. Seminar in Science Education. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six quarter 
hours. 

430. The Teaching of General Science in Secondary- 
Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course deals with content, methods, laboratory work, 
equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings of 
the introductory course in high school science. Attention 
will be given to the special studies made in the field of 
general science. 

440. Teaching of the Biological Sciences in Secondary- 
Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course deals with content, methods, laboratory work, 
equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings of the 
high school course in biology. Attention is given to the 
special studies made in the field of the high school biologi- 
cal studies. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Mr. Frank, Mr. Brewster, Mr. Flanagan, Mr. Hollar, Mr. 
Marshall, Mr. Miller, Mr. Murray, Miss Rose, Mr. Toll 

ECONOMICS 

101. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course gives an introduction to the major economic 

problems, such as the economic organization for produc- 



172 East Carolina Teachers College 

tion, forms of the business unit, large scale production 
and combinations, organization of marketing and trans- 
portation, economic functions of government, forces de- 
termining price, supply, demand, cost of production, 
competition, and monopoly. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

102. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Economics 101. Topics 
treated include: money, banking, money and price, the 
business cycle, international trade and exchange, eco- 
nomics of transportation, industrial monopoly and its 
control, risks, insurance, speculation, nature and factors 
of consumption and saving. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

103. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Economics 102. Topics 
treated include: distribution of wealth and income, rents, 
interests, wages, profits, population problems, taxation 
and public finance, problems of labor, labor unions and 
union policies, industrial conflict, industrial peace and 
industrial government, proposed reforms of the economic 
system. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

104. Investment of Savings. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to show how persons of 
small income can save, invest, and build up an income 
from their savings if they wish to do so. Topics treated 
include: the economics of savings; the psychology of sav- 
ing; opportunity for investing; interest accumulations; 
time deposits; savings banks; insurance; building and loan 
associations; annuities; mortgages; bonds, government 
bonds; real estate bonds; industrial bonds; stocks; choos- 
ing your adviser; the stock exchange; the pit; speculation 
and gambling; and such other topics as time permits. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 



Courses of Instruction 173 

105. Rural Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the major rural economics prob- 
lems with special reference to North Carolina. 
Elective for sophomores and juniors. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

110. Consumer Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with established economic principles 
from the viewpoint of the consumer especially consumer 
buying, standards for consumers, producers aids to con- 
sumers and government aids to the consumers. 

201. Money and Banking. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the forms and functions of money, credit and 
credit problems. Commercial banking, with particular 
emphasis upon its development in the United States. 
Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102. 

202. Labor Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is an introductory course in labor problems. It is 
intended to give the student a brief survey of the whole 
field of labor problems. A rapid survey is made of such 
topics as standards of living; wealth, income and wages; 
hours of labor; unemployment; women and children in 
industry; labor organizations; industrial unrest and so- 
cialism; industrial education; labor legislation; social 
insurance. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or 6 hours in economics. 

301. Business Organization and Practice. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to give the student a practical 
knowledge of the way in which our commercial and in- 
dustrial agencies are organized and financed, and how 
business is conducted. It treats of such topics as kinds of 
business organization; incorporation; reorganization; fi- 
nancing, buying and selling; corporation control; attitude 
toward stockholders and labor. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



174 East Carolina Teachers College 

302. Public Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of public revenue and expenditure, principles and 

system of taxation. 

Prerequisite: Economics 101 and 102 or their equivalent. 

310. Introduction to Railway Transportation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the economic and administrative phases of 
railway transportation in the United States. Such topics 
are treated as financial organization; rates and rate mak- 
ing; state and federal regulation; government operation; 
government ownership; current railroad problems. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

330. International Trade. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Historical and economic background of international 
trade; economic basis of international trade, tariff sys- 
tems, commercial policies and conventions; international 
finance; exporting and importing. 

402, 403. Advanced Labor Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
An intensive and critical study of the major problems of 
industrial relations. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 

410, 411. Problems in Public Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
A summary sketch of principles of public finance, followed 
by an intensive and critical study of tax systems, and of 
the various policies and programs adopted by govern- 
ments for raising and spending revenue. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instruc- 
tor. 

420, 421. History of Economic Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
These courses treat such topics as the origin, nature, and 
development of economic thought; economic thought of 
the ancients; the evolution of economics as a science; gen- 
eral account of recent leading schools of economic 
thought. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 9 hours in elemen- 
tary economics. 



Courses of Instruction 175 

GOVERNMENT 

1. An Introductory Course in American Government. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course takes up the principles upon which our state 
and national governments are based, and how the Ameri- 
can concept of democracy has been put into operation. 

102. Social Civics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed to prepare teachers for teaching citi- 
zenship in the grades. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

105. Civics: Highway Safety. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is designed to teach the principles of highway 
safety and to prepare teachers to teach this subject in the 
grades and high school. 

201. Political Parties and Politics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course treats briefly of the development of political 
parties in the United States with a more intensive study 
of present-day national parties and politics. It treats such 
topics as the party platform; nominating methods; party 
machinery; campaign methods; suffrage qualifications; 
election laws; the spoils system; the civil service reform; 
machines and bosses; practical politics in legislative 
bodies; remedies for legislative evils. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing and Government 1. 

202. Comparative Government. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
An inquiry into the principles and merits of the different 
forms of government. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

302. North Carolina State. County, and Municipal Gov- 
ernment. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
An intensive study of the State government of North 
Carolina, including its subdivisions. 
Prerequisite: Government 1. 



176 East Carolina Teachers College 

305. Social Legislation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A survey of social legislation in North Carolina and in 

the United States. 

310G. International Relations. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of international organization and relationships. 

402. The Growth of Constitutional Government. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the history and growth of constitutional devel- 
opment with emphasis upon the sources of the American 
Constitution. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HISTORY 

No student will be credited with more than one course 
of a general type covering the same period of any field of 
history. This statement does not refer to courses taken 
in high school. 

10. American History to 1783. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

11. American History, 1783 to 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

12. American History since 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

113. Ancient History to 325 A.D. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Not open to History majors and/or those who have credit 

for History 31. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

114. Medieval History, 325 to 1500. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Not open to History majors and/or those who have credit 

for History 31. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 



Courses of Instruction 177 

115. Modern European History, 1500 to 1815. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Not open to History majors and/or those who have credit 

for History 32. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

116. Modern European History, 1815 to 1914. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of History. 

200. Topics in American History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

201. Topics in Ancient History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

202. Topics in Medieval History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

203. Topics in Modern European History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

205. North Carolina History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a general survey of the social, economic, and po- 
litical history of North Carolina. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

208. Economic History of the United States to 1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of History or junior standing. 

209. Economic History of the United States since 1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of History or junior standing. 

217. The War for Southern Independence. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of History. 

218. English History to 1603. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 



178 East Carolina Teachers College 

219. English History since 1603. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

221. Contemporary History. 

One lecture and four hours supervised reading a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Each student is required to furnish a magazine or a news- 
paper that is satisfactory to the instructor each week. 
The newspapers and magazines become the property of 
the class. 

299. Economic History of Modern Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Modern European History. 

300G. The American Revolution and Counter-Revolu- 
tion.— 1769-1789. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the growth of revolutionary sentiments and 
radicalism, and the return to conservatism under the Con- 
stitution. 
Prerequisite: 18 hours of History. 

310G. Growth of Sectionalism in the U. S., 1789-1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A brief consideration of the geographical background 
followed by a mere detailed study of sectional rivalries 
from the adoption of the Federal Constitution to the out- 
break of the Civil War. 

317G. Latin- American History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of History. 

325. North Carolina History to 1835. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course makes a study of the colonial period of the 

State. 

Prerequisite: 21 hours of History. 

326. North Carolina History Since 1835. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course presents a detailed study of the nineteenth- 
century group of leaders of North Carolina, who were 
largely responsible for the social and economic life of the 
State today. 
Prerequisite: 21 hours of History. 



Courses of Instruction 179 

327G. The Revolutionary Period in Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 25 hours of History or graduate standing and 
18 hours of History. 

329G. Russia and the Near East. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A survey of the rise of Russia from feudal principality to 
great power, followed by a more detailed study of Russian 
imperialism and the Near Eastern question. 
Prerequisite: Modern European History and a total of 18 
hours of History. 

330G. The Far East Since 1850. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a survey course in the history of East Asia and the 
Pacific from the time of Commodore Perry to Pearl 
Harbor. 

340G. Background for European Nationalism. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Evolution of the idea of nationalism from its origin in the 
experience of ancient Hebrews to the national monarchies 
of the eighteenth century. 

400a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit: six quar- 
ter hours. 
Credited as Education 400 a. b. c. 

401. Europe since 1918. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

402. Diplomatic History of the United States to 1898. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

403. Diplomatic History of the United States since 1898. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

404. The Renaissaance and the Reformation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

405. History of North Carolina since 1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 



180 East Carolina Teachers College 

407. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

408. United States History since 1877. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

412. Formation of the Federal Union, 1781 to 1801. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

421. Cultural History of Medieval Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

425. Historiography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

440. The Evolution of European Nationalism since 1789. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the development of modern nationalism among 
the British, French, German, Italian, and Russian peoples. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

450. Colonial Social and Cultural History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

451. Social and Cultural History of the United States, 
1787 to 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

452. Social and Cultural History of the U. S. since 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

460. The Expansion of Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The history of the spread of Europeans and European 

Civilization overseas and its consequences, 1415-1763. 



Courses of Instruction 181 

SOCIOLOGY 

100. Introduction to Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the 

general field of society and its problems. 

101. Rural Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A continuation of Sociology 100. This course deals essen- 
tially with rural social problems, such as farm tenancy, 
rural health, and rural church, the rural family, rural 
welfare work and the general structure of rural popula- 
tion. 

102. Urban Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A continuation of Sociology 100 and 101, dealing essen- 
tially with the social structure and the problems of the 
city. 

202. Modern Social Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the origin of man and development 
of culture, with emphasis upon the physiographic, biologi- 
cal, psychological, and cultural factors in social life. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

203. Social Institutions. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The course is a continuation of Sociology 202. Stress is 
laid on the origin and development of some of the major 
social institutions. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

204. Social Anthropology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Sociology 203 and deals 
essentially with the evolution of culture. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

208. Educational Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the school as a social institution, and the so- 
ciological background of curricula and methods. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



182 East Carolina Teachers College 

210. The Administration of Public Welfare. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A historical study of the administration of public welfare 
and recent legislation covering social security. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

211. Community Resources, Agencies, and Organizations. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A community survey, analyzing its resources and the 
functions performed by its agencies and organizations. 

305. The Family. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the forms and functions of the family, with an 
attempt to analyze the present-day problems of the family. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

306. Crime and Delinquency. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A discussion and analysis of theories of criminology and 

punishment. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

308. Introduction to Social Case Work. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A brief historical background of social case work with 
major interest upon the purpose of case studies and the 
methods of the case worker. Designed for those wishing 
to qualify for case work assistants. 

320. The Development of Social Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A history of social thought and social philosophies and 

their influence in the development of culture. 

SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION 

223. Materials and Methods in High School Social 
Studies. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

323. Materials and Methods in Junior High School So- 
cial Studies. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

324. Student Teaching. 

Eighteen hours a week. Credit: twelve quarter hours. 



IX. ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS 

STUDENTS ATTENDING EAST CAROLINA 
TEACHERS COLLEGE 

June 6, 1946 to June 1, 1947 

Name Class Address County 

Abdalla, A. J Soph. Pre-Dental Selma* Johnston 

Abeyounis, Pauline E Graduate Belhaven Beaufort 

Acree, Edmund Joseph Fresh. H. S Lewiston Bertie 

Adams, Dahlia W Senior H. S Willow Springs Wake 

Adams, Lela Frances Senior H. S Blounts Creek Beaufort 

Adams, Myrtle L Junior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Adams, Peggy Junior H. S Reidsville Rockingham 

Adams, R. C Fresh. H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Adcock, Donald Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Adcock, William F Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Ainsley, Ruth G Graduate Creswell Washington 

Ainsley, T. R Graduate Creswell Washington 

Albritton, Margaret Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Alcorn, Maurice L Fresh. Pre-Engr Columbia, S. C 

Alexander, William D Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Allen, Connor M Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Alston, Betsy Fresh. P Inez Warren 

Alston, Eleanor E Soph. H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Alvarez, Ralph L Fresh. H. S Stark, Fla 

Aman, Howard E Graduate P Jacksonville Onslow 

Amerson, Douglas Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Amundson, Geraldine A Fresh. H. S New York, N. Y 

Anderson, Eugenia Junior P Burlington Alamance 

Anderson, Maxine Fresh. H. S Greensboro Guilford 

Andrews, Henry L., Jr Fresh. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Andrews, Joseph W Soph. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Andrews, Martha Jane Soph. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Andrews, Mildred L Graduate H. S Enfield Halifax 

Ange, Mercedes Junior H. S Jamesville Martin 

Applewhite, George Fresh. H. S Carolina Beach New Hanover 

Arnold, Gay Junior G Louisburg Franklin 

Arrington, Alma L Junior P Hollister Halifax 

Asbell, Rosa Fresh. H. S Edenton Chowan 

Ashley, Elizabeth Unclassified Vanceboro Craven 

Atkins, Sarah Ann Fresh. H. S Norfolk, Va 

Atkinson, Enid Soph. H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Atkinson, Anne Junior Elizabethtown Bladen 

Austin, Mary Elizabeth Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Austin, Mary Lou Soph. G Fuquay Springs Wake 

Autry, G. Raz, Jr Fresh. H. S Dunn Harnett 

Averette, Estelle Soph. H. S Oxford Granville 

Averette, Mary Alice Soph. H. S Winterville Pitt 

Averett, Rena Senior H. S Oxford Granville 

Averette, Sarah Senior G Wake Forest Wake 

Aycock, Paula Soph. H. S Fremont Wayne 



'All addresses are in North Carolina unless otherwise indicated. 



184 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Bagley, Lloyd N Fresh. H. S Hertford Nash 

Bailey, Bobby Rae Fresh. H. S Thomasville Northampton 

Bailey, Garland F Senior H. S Thomasville Johnston 

Bailey, Rayonell Junior H. S Walstonburg Onslow 

Bailey, Richard J Soph. H. S Thomasville Beaufort 

Baines, Marshall L Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Tyrrell 

Baker, Marvin L Fresh. Pre-Engr Rocky Mount Nash 

Baker, Mary Ruth Junior H. S Kinston Nash 

Baker, Ruth Joyce Senior H. S Rocky Mount Duplin 

Baldree, Josephus D Fresh. H. S Williamston 

Ballance, Sarah Senior H. S Fremont Wilson 

Ballenger, Juanita Soph. H. S Raleigh Bertie 

Banks, Audrey Frances Soph. H. S Elizabeth City Northampton 

Banks, Frances B Senior H. S Burnsville Beaufort 

Banks, Margaret Carol Senior H. S Trenton 

Bardin, Billie J.. Fresh. H. S Stantonsburg Pitt 

Barker, Kathleen Junior H. S Lumberton Bertie 

Barnes, Margaret Graduate Pinetops Davidson 

Barnes, Sidney Fresh. Pre-Med Wilson Greene 

Barnhill, Aldine Graduate H. S Greenville Forsyth 

Barnhill, Arthur D Fresh. H. S Beaufort Pitt 

Barnhill, Jacqueline Soph. H. S Stokes Duplin 

Barnhill, Nell O Senior H. S Greenville 

Barnhill, Otha A Soph. Pre-Med Greenville Northampton 

Barrett, Clyde M Soph. G Conway Edgecombe 

Basnight, Dennis B Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Warren 

Bass, Frances Junior H. S Wilmington Beaufort 

Bass, Gorell E Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Yancey 

Bass, June Soph. G Halifax Perquimans 

Bass, Mary Ann Soph. H. S Whitakers Davidson 

Bass, Ruth Edna Soph. H. S Garysburg Davidson 

Bass, Vivian Senior H. S Kenley « Greene 

Batchelor, Blanche Fresh. H. S Richlands Davidson 

Bateman, Allen H Fresh. H. S Pinetown Nash 

Bateman, Martha L Soph. H. S Columbia Edgecombe 

Battle, Ann E Junior H. S Rocky Mount Lenoir 

Battle, Nellie Junior H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Batts, Walter Teachey Unclassified Rosehill Martin 

Bauer, Leonard J Freshman Norfolk, Va Wayne 

Baumrind, Doris Senior H. S Wilson ,Wake 

Bazemore, Etta Mae Soph. H. S Windsor Pasquotank 

Bazemore, Sarah Soph. H. S Woodland Yancey 

Beacham, Lola Gray Junior H. S Washington Jones 

Beale, Dorothy V Fresh. G Portsmouth, Va Wilson 

Beaman, Mabel Special Greenville Robeson 

Beasley, Anne Senior H. S Colerain Edgecombe 

Beck, Belvin ., Jr Junior H. S Lexington Wilson 

Beddard, Ann Soph. H. S Snow Hill Pi<* 

Bedsaul, Sue Madeline Junior H. S Winston-Salem Carteret 

Bedsworth, Ellis J Graduate H.S Greenville Pitt 

Beems, Cornelia Senior H. S Faison Pitt 

Belchar, Opal Senior H. S Columbus, Ohio Pitt 

Belche, Hazel Senior P Rich Square Northampton 

Bell, IdaL Unclassified Pvocky Mount .Pasquotank 

Bell, Thomas V Fresh. H. S Warrenton New Hanover 

Bennett Dorothy Marie Junior H. S Edward Forsyth 

Bennett, Jean Senior H. S Burnsville Halifax 



Roster of Students 185 



Name Class Address County 

Bennett, Jerry O Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Bennett, Losker B Special H. S Belarthur Pitt 

Bennett, Margaret Fresh. H. S Grimesland Beaufort 

Bennett, Mary Ruth Unclassified Lumberton Robeson 

Benton, Mrs. Christine A Unclassified Raleigh Wake 

Bergeron, Hubert Soph. H. S Spring Hope Nash 

Berry, William C Fr. Pre-Dental Swan Quarter Hyde 

Best, Myra Fresh. H. S Stumpy Point Dare 

Bibb, Ellis B Fresh. H. S Weldon Halifax 

Bickel, Margaret Soph. H. S Plymouth Washington 

Biggers, John T Graduate H. S Winterville Pitt 

Bivins, Annie Maude Junior H. S Graham Alamance 

Bizzell, Alma Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Bizzell, Harold Clifton Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Blake, Curtis D Fresh. H. S Fairfield Hyde 

Blalock, Hilda Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Blalock, Lucille Soph. P Timberlake Person 

Blanchard, Doris Soph. H. S Wallace Duplin 

Blanchard, Marjorie Junior P Woodland Northampton 

Blanchard Naomi Senior H. S Hobbsville Gates 

Bland, Martha Senior H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Blanton, Myrtle Senior H. S Burgaw Pender 

Blizzard, Mildred D Graduate H. S Deep Run Lenoir 

Bobbin, Annie Lou Soph. P Creedmoor Granville 

Bobbin, Frances Senior H. S Handsom, Va 

Bond, Cora Edward Senior H. S Edenton Chowan 

Bone, Rhoda Mae Senior H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Boney, Betty Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Bonner, Frank T Sophomore Aurora Beaufort 

Bonner, Gladys Junior P Washington Beaufort 

Bonner, Mildred Lee Soph. H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Booth, Thomas F Fresh. H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Bordeaux, Ruby Lee Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Borneman, Henry D Fresh. H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Bostian, Jean Soph. Unci Wilmington New Hanover 

Bostic, Vera H Junior G Beulaville Duplin 

Both, John Basil Junior H. S Durham Durham 

Bowden, Sue H Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Bowen, Christine Marie Junior P Ahoskie Hertford 

Bowen, Martha Lou Soph. H. S Ayden Greene 

Bowen, Mary Lou Soph. H. S Boardman Columbus 

Bowen, Walter J., Jr Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Bowles, Edith Senior Greenville Pitt 

Bowling, Hazel Forrest Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Boyce, Myra Senior H. S Tyner Chowan 

Boyd, Cecil E Fresh. H. S Grimesland Pitt 

Boyd, Edmund B Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Boyd, Fenner, Jr Soph. H. S Pinetown Beaufort 

Boyd, Hilton, G Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Boyd, Jean Fresh P Greenville Pitt 

Boyd, Jesse R Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Boyette, Ruby J Junior G Greenville Pitt 

Boykin, Lida Mae Fresh. H. S Wilson Wilson 

Boykin, Mary E Fresh. H. S Sims Wilson 

Boykin, Ophelia Gray Soph. H. S Sims Wilson 

Boykin, Thomas C Fresh. Pre-Med Sims Wilson 

Bracken, Charles Soph. H. S Wilmington New Hanover 



186 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Bradley, Margaret Odom Junior H. S Jackson Northampton 

Bradshaw, Brownie Soph. H. S Willard Pender 

Brake, Louise Graduate H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Brandenburg, June Best Senior H. S Warrenton Warren 

Brandon, Virginia Soph. H. S Yadkinville Yadkin 

Branton, Richard H Fresh. H. S Shelby Cleveland 

Braswell, Corinne Soph. G Marshville Union 

Braswell, Roland Fresh. Pre-Law Goldsboro Wayne 

Braxton, Ruby Soph. H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Bray, Julia Soph. H. S Fairmont Robeson 

Brewer, Robert G Unclassified Greenville Pitt 

Bright, Edward B Junior H. S Chocowinity Pasquotank 

Bright, William T Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Beaufort 

Briley, Frances Fresh P .Chicod Pitt 

Briley, James R Soph. H. S Robersonville Pitt 

Brinson, Hilda M Soph. H. S Beaulaville Duplin 

Brinson, Mary Lois Fresh. H. S Wallace Duplin 

Britton, Corinne Senior G Jackson Northampton 

Brooks, Paul W Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brooks, Rachel Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brooks, Virginia Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Broom, Mary Elizabeth Special Greensboro Guilford 

Broughton, Margaret R Graduate H. S Raleigh Wake 

Brown, Adrian E., Jr Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Carolyn Soph. H. S Belmont Gaston 

Brown, Charles E Soph. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Brown, Coy Fresh. H. S Richlands Duplin 

Brown, Doris Hudson Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Eleanor Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Ethleen Soph. H. S Gatesville Gates 

Brown, Frances D Fresh. H. S Ahoskie Hertford 

Brown, Helen Junior H. S Magnolia Duplin 

Brown, Hubert O Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Jean R Senior H. S Burgaw Pender 

Brown, Jeanne Duncan Junior H. S Hilton Village, Va 

Brown, Joseph C Fresh. H. S Jacksonville Onslow 

Brown, Joe E Fresh. H. S Bridgeton Craven 

Brown, Naomi Ruth Senior H. S Williamston Martin 

Brown, Oscar H ..Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Wiley Senior H. S Youngsville Franklin 

Browney, Hilton G Fresh. H. S Pinetown Beaufort 

Browning, Joe G Fresh. Pre-Engr Plymouth Washington 

Browning, Rupert T Fresh. H. S .Logan, W. Va 

Brumsey, Jeanette Fresh. P Currituck Currituck 

Bryan, Linwood S., Jr Soph. H. S Oxford Granville 

Bryant, William E Fresh. H. S Pendleton Northampton 

Buck, Alton G Junior H. S Newport News, Va 

Buckmaster, Mary F Junior H. S Swansboro Onslow 

Buff, Georgia Senior P Spindale Rutherford 

Buffaloe, Ruth Soph. H. S Jackson Northampton 

Bullock, Fan Hope Fresh. H. S Manson Warren 

Bullock, James Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Bunch, Annie Cannon Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Bunch, John W Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Bunch, Maurice L. Jr Fresh. Pre-Phar Edenton Chowan 

Bunn, Christine E Soph. H. S Spring Hope Franklin 



Roster of Students 187 

Name Class Address County 

Bunn, Percy R Senior H. S Spring Hope Franklin 

Burnett, Catherine Senior H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Burnett, William E. Jr Fresh. Pre-Engr Hopewell, Va 

Burney, Elva Eileen Soph. H. S Grifton Pitt 

Burt, Winnie D Unclassified Enfield Halifax 

Burton, Marion M Soph. P Bethel Pitt 

Butler, Doris Junior G Clinton Sampson 

Butler, Gladys Lois Soph. H. S Tabor City Columbus 

Butler, Leola C Graduate G Clinton Sampson 

Butler, Margaret Iris Senior H. S Windsor Bertie 

Butler, Martha Grace Soph. H. S Atkinson Pender 

Byrd, Dorothy Soph. H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Byrd, Mary Soph. H. S Maysville Jones 

Byrum, Sallie J Unclassified Fayetteville Cumberland 

Cain, Lillian Frances Soph. H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Calvin, Sarah Y Junior P Chadbourn Columbus 

Canady, Mrs. E. H Senior G Richlands Onslow 

Canady, Rosemary Soph. H. S Swansboro Onslow 

Canady, Vernon L Fresh. Pre-Engr Washington Beaufort 

Cantrell, LouRee Senior H. S Campobello, S. C 

Capehart, Anthony Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Carr, Margaret E Soph. H. S Wallace Duplin 

Carr, Mary Elizabeth Soph. H. S Wallace Duplin 

Carrol, Ellen L Grad. H. S Farmville Pitt 

Carroll, Ruth Junior H. S Durham Durham 

Carson, Anne Ford Soph. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Carter, Elizabeth Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Carter, Hugh W Freshman Weldon Halifax 

Carter, H. Winfield Junior Greenville Pitt 

Carter, Mary Ruth Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cartledge, Margaret Lee Soph. P Tarboro .jEdgecombe 

Casey, Aimeul H Fresh. Pre-Law Kinston Lenoir 

Casey, Paul M Fresh. H. S Four Oakes Johnston 

Casey, Thomas E Fresh. H. S Four Oakes Johnston 

Cash, Edna Earle Fresh. G Wendell Wake 

Cash, James M Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Cashwell, Ella Mae Junior H. S Saxapahaw Alamance 

Cashwell, Joseph L., Jr Graduate H.S Bellarthur Pitt 

Cates, Ann Senior P Durham Durham 

Cates, Annie Thompson Junior G Hurdle Mills Person 

Caudell, Freda Senior H. S Buie's Creek Harnett 

Causey, John L Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cavendish, Lou N Graduate P Greenville Pitt 

Cavendish, Meredith E Soph. Pre-Law Greenville Pitt 

Caviness, Louise Junior H. S Holly Springs Wake 

Chaplin, Jean Senior H. S Ayden Pitt 

Charles, Catherine Senior G Ahoskie Hertford 

Charlton, John D Senior H. S Barracksville, W. Va 

Charlton, Mary Alice Senior P Raleigh Wake 

Chason, Charleen Graduate H. S Lumber Bridge Robeson 

Cherry, Rebecca Senior H. S Stokes Pitt 

Cherry, William F., Jr Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Chesson, Bryan W Sophomore..... Vanceboro Craven 

Chesson, Ernest E., Jr Graduate H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Chinnis, Robert J Fresh. Lab.-Tech Leland Brunswick 

Clark, Amos O Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 



188 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Clarke, Camille B GraduateH. S ....Lake Landing.. ...^^.^^Hyde 

Clark, Charles G Fresh. H. S Belhaven Beaufort 

Clark, Edwin L Unclassified Greenville Pitt 

Clark, Ellen Soph. H. S Everetts Martin 

Clark, James C Fresh. H. S Grimesland Pitt 

Clark, Myrtle B Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Clarke, Milton V Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Clark, Paul J Graduate H. S Grifton Pitt 

Clark, Virgil S .Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Clifton, Ronald B Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Coates, Margaret Quinn Senior P Farmville Pitt 

Cochran, Grace Senior P Bradley, Ark 

Cochran, Mary Carolyn Junior G Bradley, Ark 

Cocke, Emily Soph. P Jackson Northampton 

Cockrell, Onnie GraduateH. S Wilson Wilson 

Coiner, Francis M Junior H. S Newport News, Va 

Cole, Betty Junior H. S Forest City Rutherford 

Cole, Donald H Fresh. Pre-Dental... Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Collier, Lewis E Fresh. H. S Littleton... Halifax 

Collins, Evelyn Junior H. S Maysville Jones 

Collins, Floyd R Fresh. Pre-Med Cerro Gordo , Columbus 

Collins, James E., Jr Soph. H S Greenville Pitt 

Collins, Johnsie Senior H. S Waxhaw Union 

Collins, Velma Fresh. H. S Spencer Rowan 

Connaughton, William A Fresh. H. S Newport News, Va 

Connelly, Ernest J Fresh. Pre-Dental Hopewell, Va 

Connor, Charles David Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Conroy, Vivien Sitterson Senior H. S Plymouth Washington 

Cook, David E Fresh. Pre-Dental Whiteville Columbus 

Cooper, Doris E Fresh. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Cooper, Henrietta Senior H. S Wallace Duplin 

Corbin, Ashley H Fresh. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Corey, Carl P Fresh. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Corey, James R Soph. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Corey, Johnie F Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cothran, Dorothy Ann Senior P Rougemont Person 

Gotten, Mary Sue Junior H. S Kipling Harnett 

Cottrell, Mrs. Ann S Junior H. S Oxford Granville 

Council, JanieEakes GraduateH. S Greenville Pitt 

Council, William C Senior H. S Durham Durham 

Covington, Marjorie T Soph. H. S Norfolk, Va 

Cowand, Annie L Junior P Powellsville Bertie 

Cox, Ann Irene Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cox, Carl Thomas Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Cox, Elmer M Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cox, Evelyn D Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cox, Jean Junior H. S Macclesfield Edgecombe 

Cox, Thomas E Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Cox, Willie C, Jr Fresh. H. S Richlands Craven 

Cozart, James F Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Crabtree, Clara Lee Senior H. S Fuquay Springs Harnett 

Craft, Margaret Thompson Senior G Greenville Pitt 

Craft, Thomas L., Jr Fresh. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Craft, William E Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Craver, Paul Soph. H. S Lexington Davidson 

Crawford, Nellie Ruth Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 



Roster of Students 189 



Name Class Address County 

Credle, Mary E Soph. G Oxford Granville 

Creech, Josephine Junior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Crenshaw, Billy Reid Fresh. Pre-Engr Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Croom, Betty A Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Croom, James C Fresh. H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Cross, Charles V., Jr Freshman Gates Gates 

Cuddihy, Roy L Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Cuddihy, W. F Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Cunningham, Mrs. Bessie Unclassified Fayetteville Cumberland 

Currier, Colline B Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Currin, John Gray Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Currin, Shirley Ann Soph. H. S Angier Harnett 

Dail, Anne Senior H. S Kenansville Duplin 

Dail, Ernestine Soph. H. S Suffolk, Va 

Dail, Stanley Fresh. Pre.-Agr Kinston Jones 

Daniels, Edythe Grace Fresh. H. S Black Creek Wilson 

Daniels, Frances Soph. H. S Camp Lejeune Onslow 

Daniel, Mary Lou Junior H. S Stem Granville 

Daniel, Plummer A Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Daniels, Stewart M Fresh. H. S .Wanchese .Dare 

Darden, Harper S Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Daughtry, Lovestine Soph. H. S Clinton Sampson 

Davenport, Florence A Senior H. S Dover Jones 

Davenport, Helen M Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Davenport, Horace N Soph. H. S Deep Run Lenoir 

Davenport, H. V Graduate H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Davenport, JoeB., Jr Soph. H. S Windsor Bertie 

Davenport, Kathryn Senior P Gumberry Northampton 

Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 
Dav 



d, Redwan E Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Fayetteville Cumberland 

d, Richard Graduate H. S Vanceboro Craven 

s, Bonnie Ruth Soph. H. S Ayden Greene 

s, Edna Soph. H. S Clinton Sampson 

s, Gordon B Junior H. S Beaufort Carteret 

s, Graham J Fresh. Pre-Med Littleton Warren 

s, Ida F Graduate P Burgaw Pender 

s, Isaac P., Jr Soph. H. S Manteo Dare 

s, Lorraine Y Senior H. S Areola Warren 

s, Mary Alice Senior P Greenville Pitt 

s, Myrtle Christine Soph. H. S Lucama Wilson 

s, Ralph L Fresh. H. S Beaufort Carteret 

s, Raymond Jack Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

s, Robert M Fresh. H. S Robbins Moore 

s, Rockie Lee Soph. P Seaboard Northampton 

s, Thomas Soph. H. S Conway Northampton 

s, William B Fresh. Pre-Engr Stantonsburg Wilson 

Dawson, Doris Soph. H. S Dunn, R.F.D Sampson 

Dawson, Rita Dell Senior H. S Dunn Harnett 

Day, Muriel Senior P Oriental Pamlico 

Dean, John P Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Dean, Maynard A Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Dean, William Douglas Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Denning, Susie Senior H. S Newton Grove Sampson 

Denny, Donald Freshman Burlington Alamance 

Dewar, Allen V Fresh. Pre-Engr Fuquay Springs Wake 

Dewar, Fay Wray Soph. P Fuquay Springs, E..F.D.. Harnett 

Dexter, Catherine Junior H. S Richlands Onslow 



190 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Dickens, Margaret Soph. H. S Fuquay Springs Wake 

Dilday, Allie Mitchell Senior H. S Ahoskie Hertford 

Dilday, Nancy Adeline Junior P Ahoskie Hertford 

Dilday, Thelma Senior H. S Ahoskie Hertford 

Dillard, Merilyn Soph. H. S Roxboro Person 

Dillingham, Agnes Junior H. S Burlington Alamance 

Dillon, Barbara J Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Dixon, Donald W Fresh. H. S Grantsboro Pamlico 

Dixon, Jerold H Fresh. H. S Robersonville Martin 

Dixon, Mary Cameron Senior H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Dixon, Virginia Grace Soph. H. S Creedmoor .' Granville 

Djiovandis, George C Soph. H. S Hopewell, Va 

Donnerson, Marjorie J Fresh. H. S Dover Craven 

Doresky. Ellsworth M Freshman Milton, Pa 

Doughtie, Ruth Fresh P Ahoskie .Hertford 

Douglas, Jean Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Douville, Mary W Special Greenville Pitt 

Dowd, O. E Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Drake, Velma Senior H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Draughon, Ada Gray Senior P Dunn Harnett 

Duboise, Rosa D Unclassified Vanceboro Croom 

Duboise, Thomas Graduate Vanceboro Craven 

Dudley, Ronald Lee Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Duke, Anna Page Senior G Jackson Northampton 

Dunning, Robert E Fresh. H. S Plymouth Washington 

Dupree, Allen R ..Fresh. Pre-Engr Plymouth Washington 

Durham, William H., Jr Freshman Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Duval, Carolyn Faye Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Eakes, Tilly Soph. H. S Varina Wake 

Eagan, Elsie Simpson Graduate P Greenville Pitt 

Early, Aldine Senior H. S Aulander Bertie 

Early, Marian M Junior P Aulander Bertie 

Early, William T Fresh. Pre-Engr Lewiston Bertie 

Easley, Virginia Soph. H. S Farmville Pitt 

Eason, Robert W Fresh. H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Eatman, Margaret Senior H. S Roseboro Sampson 

Eckhoff, Oscar B Soph. Pre-Engr Washington Beaufort 

Edgerton, Gilmer Senior H. S Kenly Johnston 

Edmonds, Mary P Unclassified Jacksonville, Fla 

Edmondson, Georgie G Fresh. H. S Robersonville Martin 

Edmundson, Bertha Senior H. S Pikeville Wayne 

Edmundson, Myra L Senior H. S Stantonsburg Wilson 

Edmundson, Ruth Gray Soph. P Pikeville Wayne 

Edwards, Charles H Fresh. Pre-Engr Lewiston Bertie 

Edwards, Emma Jean Soph. P Seaboard Northampton 

Edwards, Garland E Fresh. H. S Chocowinity Beaufort 

Edwards, Geraldine Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Edwards, Jack Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Edwards, Joseph Dixon Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Edwards, Louise Senior H. S Pendleton Northampton 

Edwards, Lucille Soph. G La Grange Wayne 

Edwards, Mary Susan Junior H. S Tabor City Columbus 

Edwards, Peggy Soph. P Grimesland Pitt 

Edwards, Samuel R Graduate H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Edwards, Sarah Lou Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Edwards, William H Junior H. S Nomini Grove, Va 



Roster of Students 191 



Name Class Address County 

Edwards, William J Fresh. H. S Chicod Pin 

Eldridge, Edna Jane Graduate P Dunn Sampson 

Elks, Hallian V., Jr Graduate G Greenville Pitt 

Elks, Juanita Rhodes Fresh. H. S Zebulon Wake 

Ellenberg, Lois Soph. H. S Leaksville Rockingham 

Elliott, Lucia Soph. P Oxford Granville 

Ellis, Mary Adams Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Ellis, Mary Elizabeth Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Ellis, Nell Rose Soph. H. S Gatesville Gates 

Ellis, Sarah Jean Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

English, Alma Ruth Junior H. S Willard Pender 

Ennett, William B Fresh. Pre-Med Swansboro Onslow 

Ennis, Dorothy Soph. H. S Jacksonville Onslow 

Enzor, Louise Soph. H. S Fair Bluff Columbus 

Etheridge, Dorothy Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Etheridge, Hazel Soph. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Etheridge, Howard C Fresh. H. S Hobgood Martin 

Eure, Claudia M Fresh. H. S Candor Montgomery 

Evans, Delia Junior H. S Hertford Perquimans 

Evans, Harriet Ray Senior Greenville Pitt 

Everett, Edward E Fresh. H. S Edenton Chowan 

Everett, Elizabeth W Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Everton, Jack Fresh. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Everton, Myron Fresh. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Exum, William H., Jr Fresh. H. S Stantonsburg Wilson 

Fagan, Franklin, Jr Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Farley, Mrs. Margaret B Graduate Maysville Tones 

Fasciano, John J , Fresh. H. S Staten Island, N. Y 

Fay, Wilber L Senior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Fearing, Z. E Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Feezor, L. Audrey Soph. H. S Lexington Davidson 

Felton, Annie Pitt Senior G Kinston Edgecombe 

Ferrell, William B., Jr Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Fields, Milton P Soph. H. S Scotland Neck Halifax 

Fillyaw, Mary Louise Senior H. S Roseboro Sampson 

Finch, Alton V Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Finch, Glenna Fresh. H. S Sims Wilson 

Finch, JohnD Soph. Pre-Dental Oxford Granville 

Finch, William A., Jr Fresh. H. S Smithfield Johnston 

Fischel, Frances Fresh. H. S Vaughan Warren 

Fischel, Mamie Lee Senior H. S Vaughan Warren 

Fischel, Samuel M Fresh. H. S Vaughan Warren 

Fischel, Sophie Soph. H. S Vaughan Warren 

Fite, Robert E .Fresh. Pre-Engr Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Fleming, Claude T., Jr Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Fleming, Leon B., Jr Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Flora, Frances F Fresh. H. S Moyock Currituck 

Flowers, Mrs. Eloise Senior G New Bern Craven 

Flowers, Particia Ann Soph. H. S New Bern Craven 

Floyd, Rachel Fresh. H. S Orrum Robeson 

Floyd, Ruth Kathleen Junior H. S Cerro Gordo Columbus 

Floyd, Virginia Lee Soph. H. S Barnesville Robeson 

Flythe, M. Thomas Fresh. H. S Conway Northampton 

Fodrie, Jean Junior H. S Beaufort Carteret 

Fokadis, Nicholas T Fresh. H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Forlines, Corinia Gold Junior H. S Winterville Pitt 



192 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Forrest, Elaine Senior H. S Winterville Pitt 

Forrest, Elvy K Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Forrest, Joyce C Senior H. S New Bern Craven 

Forrest, Louise Soph. G Ayden Greene 

Forrest, Ola H Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Forrest, Ollie F Fresh. H. S Farmville Pitt 

Forrest, Rufus H Graduate H. S Winterville Pitt 

Fort, William H Fresh. H. S Stantonsburg Wilson 

Franck, James R Soph. H. S Scotland Neck Halifax 

Fratarcongelo, Dante Fresh. H. S Hopewell, Va 

Frazzelle, Alice F Junior H. S Richlands Onslow 

Frazzelle, Gerald C Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Frazzelle, Kenneth Soph. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Frazzelle, Roscoe D Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Frazzelle, Z. W Graduate H. S Richlands Onslow 

Freeman, Mrs. G. T Senior P Windsor Bertie 

Freeman, Raymond C Junior H. S Winton Hertford 

Fryar, Jimmy Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Wilmington New Hanover 

Fulp, Bill R Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Fulp, Vestal Gray Fresh. Pre-Engr Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Futrell, Rachel Ann Fresh. H. S Rich Square Northampton 

Gable, Billy Lee Freshman Norfolk, Va 

Gaither, Penelope W Junior. G Creswell Washington 

Garcia, Andrew R Fresh. Pre-Dental... Key West, Fla 

Gardner, Frances Junior G Pikeville Wayne 

Gardner, H. Marvin Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Gardner, Irving, R Freshman Jamesville Martin 

Garner, Melba Senior P Newport Carteret 

Garrell, Leroy M Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Clarendon Columbus 

Garris, Emma Lee Senior H. S Ayden Pitt 

Garris, Grover E Soph. H. S Ayden Pitt 

Garris, Ruby Glenn Graduate P Ayden Pitt 

Gaskill, David W Graduate H. S Washington Beaufort 

Gaskin, Helen Soph. H. S New Bern Craven 

Gaskins, Robert B Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Gay, Bruce S Fresh. H. S Jackson Northampton 

Gay, Mary Alice Soph. H. S Whitakers Nash 

Gaylord, Russell M Fresh. H. S Pinetown Beaufort 

Gaylord, Virginia Soph. H. S Granville Pitt 

Gentry, Marie Junior G Roxboro Person 

George, Nicholas J Graduate H. S Tyner Chowan 

Getsinger, John C Fresh. Pre-Engr Williamston Martin 

Gibbs, Margaret B Unclassified Lake Landing Hyde 

Gibson, Doris Senior G Hoffman Richmond 

Gibson, Katheryne Junior H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Giles, Thomas G Fresh. H. S Lexington Davidson 

Gilliam, Anne Senior P Windsor Bertie 

Gilliam, Thomas Junior H. S Windsor Bertie 

Glover, Betsy Soph. P Zebulon Wake 

Glover, Robert M Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Gooding, Carnie C Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Gore, Carol Soph. H. S Clarendon Columbus 

Gore, Wade Fresh. H. S Clarendon Columbus 

Grady, Edward L Soph. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Grady, Mary Anna Junior H. S Seven Springs Duplin 

Grady, R.aymond P Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 



Roster of Students 193 



Name Class Address County 

Graham, Emily Lee Fresh. H. S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Graham, Katherine Fresh. H. S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Graham, Rose Soph. H. S Turkey Sampson 

Grant, Evelyn .Senior H. S Garysburg Northampton 

Grant, Mercer A Fresh. H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Gray, Baxter M Fresh. H. S Nags Head Dare 

Gray, Christine Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Gray, Howard A Unclassified Enfield Halifax 

Gray, Jack S Freshman Buxton Dare 

Gray, Lucille Fresh. G Stokes Pitt 

Gray, Robert Alton Soph. H. S Stokes Pitt 

Gray, Wannie F Junior H. S Clarksburg, W. Va 

Greene, Billie Burson Soph. H. S Gates Gates 

Greene, Emily Elizabeth Senior. P Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Greene, Estelle Graduate Greenville Pitt 

Greene, Leman E Fresh. H. S Savanah, Ga 

Greene, Silvia Soph. H. S Williamston Martin 

Gregory, Joseph F Senior P Farmville Pitt 

Griffin, Jayne Soph. P Edenton Perquimans 

Griffin, Ruth Fresh. H. S Lemon Springs Lee 

Griffin, Thomas Junior P Williamston Martin 

Griggs, Mildred A Fresh. H. S Point Harbor Currituck 

Grissom, Hilda Soph. G Henderson Vance 

Gullen, Elizabeth Senior H. S Lawrenceville, Va 

Gurganus, Gene Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Gurganus, Ralph Soph. H. S Jacksonville Onslow 

Gurganus, Sally Joe Soph. P Bethel Pitt 

Gurganus, Wallace Soph. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Gurley, Dixie Lee Junior G Goldsboro Wayne 

Gurley, Emma Louise Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Gurley, T. R Soph. Pre-Engr Goldsboro Wayne 

Guthrie, Maxine C Fresh. H. S Morehead Carteret 

Guthrie, Mildred Senior G Grimesland Pitt 

Guthrie, Thomas L Senior H. S Vanceboro Pitt 

Hagan, Geraldine B Unclassified Hookerton Greene 

Hagans, Jack Fresh. H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Haislip, Janie L .Soph. P Oak City Martin 

Hales, William L Fresh. H. S Norfolk, Va 

Hall, Arlene Junior G Roxboro Person 

Hall, Eugene O Fresh. H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Hall, Margaret Senior H. S Woodsdale Person 

Hall, Rosalyle Soph. H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Hall, William H Fresh. H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Hamilton, Jean Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Hamilton, Milon Soph. H. S Aurora '. Beaufort 

Hamilton, Vera Louise Graduate G Sea Level Carteret 

Haney, Jim Special... Greenville Pitt 

Hanks, Lucy Soph. G Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Hannon, Walter T Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Hansel, Paul M Fresh. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Happer, Mary Ann Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Hardee, Arthur L Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Hardee, Elizabeth : Senior H. S Dunn Harnett 

Harden, Lucille Fresh. P Windsor Bertie 

Hardison, Thelma Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Hardison, Velma Rose Soph. H. S Williamston Martin 



194 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Hardy, Dorothy B Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Hardy, Helen Christine Junior H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Hare, Ethel V Fresh. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Hargrove, Mabel R Junior P Lumberton Robeson 

Harper, Lavina Soph. H. S Pikeville Wayne 

Harper, Miriam Harris Junior H. S Spring Hope Nash 

Harper, Wilma Soph. H. S Pikeville Wayne 

Harrell, Roberick A Fresh. H. S Macclesfield Edgecombe 

Harris, Cecil Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Harris, Claude W Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Harris, Dorothy E Soph. P Macon , Warren 

Harris, Edward E Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Harris, Genora Jane Soph. H. S Spring Hope Franklin 

Harris, Hazel Marie Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Harris, Henry W Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Harris, Jackson G., Jr Senior H. S Stovall Granville 

Harris, Jesse P. T., Jr Fresh. Pre-Engr Vaughan Warren 

Harris, Leon T Fresh. Pre-Engr Washington Beaufort 

Harris, Mary Ann Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Harris, Norman Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Harris, Rochelle Soph. H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Harris, Vera Scott Soph. P Seaboard Northampton 

Harris, Wilbur P Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Harrison, Ben Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Harrison, Robert Wayne Sophomore Thomasville Davidson 

Hart, Blanche Graduate P Ayden Pitt 

Hart, Marie Graduate P Ayden Pitt 

Haskett, Deanie B Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Hatem, Joseph E Special Greenville Pitt 

Hatley, Annie Wray Senior H. S Marshville Union 

Hawkins, Ruby Soph. H. S Henedrson Vance 

Hayes, Benjamin S Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Haynes, Wanda Rose Soph. H. S Wilson Wilson 

Heafner, George W Senior H. S Lincolnton Lincoln 

Heath, Annie Doris Junior H. S Kinston , Lenoir 

Heath, John W Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Heath, Margaret Soph. H. S Alliance Pamlico 

Hedgepeth, Gene B Soph. H. S Whiteville Columbus 

Hedgepeth, Oliver P Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Hedspeth, Robert P Fresh. H. S Conway Northampton 

Hege, Eloise Anita Junior H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Hellen, Betsy Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Helms, Martha F Junior G Monroe Union 

Hemingway, John D Fresh. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Hemingway, William E Fresh. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Henderson, Coleman H Fresh. H. S Graham Alamance 

Henderson, Maxie Senior H. S Fayetteville Bladen 

Henderson, Sue Senior P Hickory Catawba 

Henry, Robert B Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Herndon, Kenneth D Fresh. H. S Wendell Wake 

Herring, Josephine Fresh. H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Herring, Juanita Ann Junior H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Herring, Lila Soph. H. S Seven Springs Duplin 

Herring, Winnie Eleanor Junior H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Herriott, Dean Soph. H. S Champaign, 111 

Herriott, Ruth Beddard Senior H. S Winterville Pitt 



Roster of Students 195 



Name Class Address County 

Hester, Ben S Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Hewett, Vernie Soph. P Supply Brunswick 

High, George T Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Hight, William T Fresh. Pre-Med Oxford Granville 

Hill,' Clarence C Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Hill, Garland E Fresh. H. S Chocowinity Beaufort 

Hill, Mabel Unclassified Kinston Lenoir 

Hill, Morris L Fresh. Pre- Vet Deep Run Lenoir 

Hill, Myron T Fresh. H. S Chocowinity Beaufort 

Hill, Verona White Senior P Washington Beaufort 

Hill, William P Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Hines, Esther Mae Junior H. S Enfield Halifax 

Hines, Joseph W Junior H. S Washington .Beaufort 

Hinnant, Nora Lee Senior H. S Pikeville Wayne 

Hinson, Virginia Junior H. S Walstonburg Greene 

Hitchcock, Barbara Fresh. H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Hobgood, Frances E Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Hodges, Edna Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Hofler, Iola Welch Junior H. S Gatesville Gates 

Hogg, Franklin S Fresh. H. S New Rochelle, N. Y 

Hokum, Robert Soph. H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Holland, Gwen H Fresh. H. S Hopewell, Va 

Holland, James E Fresh. H. S Hopewell, Va 

Holliday, Ruth L Fresh. G Rocky Mount Nash 

Holloman, Richard D Fresh. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Holloway, Corinne Junior G Greenville Pitt 

Holt, Margaret Senior H. S Princeton Johnston 

Honeycutt, Yvonne Senior H. S Roseboro Sampson 

Honeycutt, Doris Junior H. S Angier Harnett 

Honeycutt, Margaret W Junior H. S Clinton Sampson 

Hooker, Harriett Sophomore Aurora Beaufort 

Hopkins, Peggy Senior H. S Oak City Martin 

Home, Jessie Mae Senior H. S Pendleton Northampton 

Houston, Pattie Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Howard, Charles J Fresh. H. S Wilkesboro Wilkes 

Howard, Clyde M Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Howard, Jesse R Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Howard, Lava Graduate H. S Statesville Iredell 

Howard, Lois Senior H. S Jacksonville Onslow 

Howard, Rufus D Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Howard, Thelma Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Howes, Edmund M i Soph. H. S Walton, N Y 

Howell, Margaret Soph. P Severn Northampton 

Huband, Earl Carlton Soph. Pre-Engr Wilmington New Hanover 

Huband, Elizabeth Graduate G Greenville Pitt 

Hudson, Everett Senior H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Hudson, Keith C Junior Thomasville Davidson 

Huff, John R Fresh. H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Hughes, Clifford C, Jr Fresh Pre-Engr Oxford Granville 

Hughes, Talton T Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Humber, Marcel B Special Greenville Pitt 

Humbles, Hannah Ruth Senior H. S Ayden Pitt 

Humphrey, Mary Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Hunsucker, Lucy , Unclassified Gibson Scotland 

Hunt, Daniel A Fresh. Pre-Med Oxford Granville 

Hunt, Elsie Gray Senior H. S Louisburg Franklin 



196 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Hunt, Myra W Fresh. G Stantonsburg Wilson 

Hunter, Florence M Graduate H. S Mt. Rainier, Md 

Hunter, Helen Rouse Senior G Warsaw Duplin 

Hunter, Ralph Fresh. H. S Plymouth Washington 

Hunter, Robert A Unclassified Lowell, Mass 

Ingold, Polly Unclassified Elizabethtown Bladen 

Ingram, Ralph K Soph. H. S Princeton Johnston 

Ipock, Edith Soph. H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Ipock, Ernest R Fresh. Pre-Engr Vanceboro Craven 

Isley, Mary George Junior H. S Pinetops Edgecombe 

Jackson, George E Soph. H. S Concord Cabarrus 

Jackson, Joseph F Fresh. H. S Grifton Pitt 

Jackson, Leon W Fresh. H. S Pikeville Wayne 

Jackson, Lou Grad. Aud Reulahville .Duplin 

Jackson, Sue H Graduate H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Jacocks, Hazel E Fresh. H. S Lewiston Bertie 

Jacocks, Jesse C Fresh. Pre-Engr Lewiston Bertie 

James, Annie L Graduate. Aud Bethel Pitt 

James, Benjamin Unclassified Robersonville Pitt 

James, Colleen Junior P Goldsboro Wayne 

James, Gerald D Graduate H. S Bethel Pitt 

James, Hassel Fresh. H. S Stokes Pitt 

James, Kenneth C Junior H. S Winterville Pitt 

James, Larry M., Jr Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

James, Ward Graduate Winterville Pitt 

Jarvis, Ada Lee Graduate P Washington .Beaufort 

Jarvis, Harry J Senior H. S Hopewell, Va 

Jarvis, James E Soph. H. S Oxford Granville 

Jarvis, Mona W Graduate P Washington Beaufort 

Jarvis, Warren B Fresh. Pre-Engr Havelock Craven 

Jefferson, Martha Senior H. S Fountain Pitt 

Jenkins, Andrew Fresh. H. S Potecasi Northampton 

Jenkins, Elsie Soph. H. S Wallace Duplin 

Jenkins, Evelyn Soph. P Littleton Halifax 

Jenkins, H. Bernice Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Jennette, Helen Senior H. S Raleigh Wake 

Jernigan, Eva Estelle Soph. H. S Dunn Sampson 

Jernigan, Suzanne Junior H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Jessup, Carolyn Soph. H. S Tyner Chowan 

Jessup, Faye Graduate H. S Tyner Chowan 

Johnson, Annie Belle Senior G Ingold Sampson 

Johnson, Annie Blanche Senior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Johnson, Grace Senior H. S Morrisville Wake 

Johnson, Joan Yvette Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Johnson, Martha Soph. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Johnson, Mildred Graduate H. S Woodland Northampton 

Johnson, Roxie G Soph. H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Johnson, Ruth Junior H. S New Holland Hyde 

Johnson, Sidney P Soph. Pre-Dental Greenville Pitt 

Johnson, Sterling ., Fresh. H. S Littleton Warren 

Johnson, William S Senior H. S Conway Northampton 

Johnson, Wilma D Soph. H. S Dunn Sampson 

Johnston, Sally M Senior H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Johnston, Steven N Fresh. H. S Littleton Warren 



Roster of Students 197 

Name Class Address County 

Johnston, William H Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Jolly, Katherine Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Jones, Alma Lee Junior G Winterville Pitt 

Jones, Dorothy B Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Jones, Dorothy D Senior P Farmville Pitt 

Jones, Douglas R Senior H. S Farmville Pitt 

Jones, Frederick W Fresh. Pre-Engr Rocky Mount Nash 

Jones, Helen Senior H. S Dover Craven 

Jones, James E Fresh. H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Jones, Jewel Frances Junior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Jones, Louise A Junior G Wilmington New Hanover 

Jones, Margaret I Senior P Fairfield Hyde 

Jones, Mary Scott Senior G Lumberton Robeson 

Jones, Normand E Soph. H. S Farmville Pitt 

Jones, Ruby Mae Soph. H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Jones, Sammie Lee Soph. H. S Carolina Beach New Hanover 

Jones, Thelma Junior H. S Winterville Pitt 

Jones, Vernon A Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Jordan, Alice Ann Fresh. H. S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Joyce, Virginia Fresh. H. S Morehead Carteret 

Joyner, Josie Senior H. S Sharpsburg Edgecombe 

Joyner, Lillian C Senior G Greenville Pitt 

Joyner, Thelma O Soph. H. S Harrellsville Hertford 

Kearney, Illmar Senior H. 5 Snow Hill Greene 

Kearney, Rosalie Junior H. S Camp Burner -Granville 

Kearney, Wilmar Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Kee, Samuel J Fresh. H. S Manteo Dare 

Keel, Dorothy Senior G Oak City Martin 

Keiter, Josie Belle Senior H. S Merry Hill Bertie 

Kelly, Sophie Marie Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Kemp, Helen J Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Keisler, George O Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Kilby, Edith Soph. H. S Bath Beaufort 

Kilby, Elsie Junior H. S Bath Beaufort 

Kilpatrick, Ernest L Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Kilpatrick, Frank K Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Kilpatrick, Frank M., Jr Freshman Ayden Pitt 

Kimbrell, Jack E Soph. H. S Waxhaw Union 

Kimeley, Jean Ipock Senior H. S New Bern Craven 

Kimley, Robert J , Fresh. Pre-Engr New Bern Craven 

King, Colleen Davis Senior P New Bern Craven 

King, Doris Junior P St. Pauls Robeson 

King, Georgia Junior H. S Durham Durham 

King, Paul H., Jr Fresh. H. S Clinton Sampson 

King, Ralph H Fresh. Pre-Engr St. Pauls Robeson 

Kinlaw, Betty Joyce Senior H. S Ayden Pitt 

Kinlaw, Carl L Fresh. H. S Groveland, Fla 

Kirby, Hazel Senior H. S Lucama Wilson 

Kirkland, Rebecca Senior H. S Durham Durham 

Kirven, Ophelia Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Kittrell, William Fresh. H. S Winterville Pitt 

Knight, Mary Lou Fresh. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Knight, William E Graduate H. S Stakes Pitt 

Knott, Julia C - Soph. H. S Oxford Granville 

Koonce, Arline Junior G Richlands Onslow 



198 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Koonce, Irene Soph. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Koonce, John C Soph. Pre-Engr Aurora Beaufort 

Koonce, E. Warren Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Komegay, Victoria Senior H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Krank, Ruth Junior H. S Poplar Branch Currituck 

Kunze, Mary Ann Soph. H. S Leaksville Rockingham 

Lamb, Frances Peele Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Lamb, Ruth Special Washington Beaufort 

Lamm, Jesse M Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Lamm, Mary P Senior H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Lamm, Margie Fresh. H. S Lucama Wilson 

Lamm, Wanda Senior H. S Wilson Wilson 

Lancaster, Elizabeth Senior P New Bern Craven 

Lancaster, Laurie M Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Lancaster, Lucy Senior P Vanceboro Craven 

Lancaster, Mary Frances Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Lancaster, Rosa A Senior H. S New Bern Craven 

Land, Syble Rosa Junior H. S Chadbourn Columbus 

Landing, Putt Fresh. H. S Eure Gates 

Lang, Mildred Special Ayden Pitt 

Langdon, Ruth Senior G Coats Harnett 

Langly, Chester, Jr Fresh. H. S Farmville Pitt 

Lanier, Sue Soph. H. S Lillington Harnett 

Larkins, Thomas G Soph. H. S Scotia, N. Y 

Lassiter, George W Fresh. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Lassiter, Joseph A Senior H. S Conway Northampton 

Lassiter, Ruth Muriel Junior H. S Four Oaks Johnston 

Lawson, Alta L Senior H. S Orrum Robeson 

Lawyer, Catherine Soph. H. S Suffolk, Va 

Layton, Lucy H -Soph. H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Leatherwood, Eva Graduate P Waynesville Haywood 

Lee, Alta White Senior H. S Newton Grove Sampson 

Lee, Charles O Fresh. H. S Stantonsburg Wilson 

Lee, Earl B Fresh. H. S Colerain Bertie 

Lee, Mary Hales Junior H. S Aberdeen Moore 

Lee, R. B Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Lee, Rachel Dare Junior H. S Newton Grove Sampson 

Leggett, Alameda Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Leggett, Amos C Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Lewis, Dorothy H Graduate H S Farmville Pitt 

Lewis, Frances Ellen Senior H. S Farmville Pitt 

Lewis, Jane Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Pender 

Lewis, L. Coy Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Lewis, Margaret L Senior P Greenville Pitt 

Lewis, Margie Soph. H S Enfield Halifax 

Lewis, Mary Collie Junior H. S Dublin Bladen 

Lewis, Nancy -Senior H. S Farmville Pitt 

Lewis, Newman Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Lewis, Wilma M Graduate P Dublin Bladen 

Liles, John W Fresh. H. S Garland Bladen 

Lilley, Christine Soph. H. S Williamston Martin 

Lilley, John D., Jr Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Link, Cletus M Fresh. H. S Salisbury Davidson 

Little, Charles H Senior H. S Winterville Pitt 

Little, Garland G Soph. H. S Ayden Pitt 



Roster of Students 199 

Name Class Address County 

Little, H. Mack Fresh. H. S Conover Catawba 

Little, James A Junior H. S Winterville Pitt 

Lochridge, James T Soph. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Long, Charles O Junior H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Long, Herbert R Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Long, Lydia Fresh. H. S Mebane Alamance 

Long, Mildred Special Ayden Pin 

Long, Nina Ruth Soph. H. S Angier Harnett 

Lowe, Elizabeth Soph. H. S Shallotte Brunswick 

Lowery, Rena Junior H. S Trenton Jones 

Lupton, Exave Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Lupton, Howard R Fresh. H. S Pantego Beaufort 

Lynch, Joseph R Fresh. H. S Whiteville Columbus 

Lyon, Patricia Soph. H. S Ayden Pitt 

McClaren, Robert, Jr Fresh. H. S Robersonville Martin 

McCotter, Frank R Fresh. H. S Vandemere Pamlico 

McCotter, Robert F Fresh. H. S Vandemere Pamlico 

McCormick, Lois Soph. H. S Jonesboro Lee 

McCullen, Bertha Unclassified Faison Sampson 

McDaniel, Jesse Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

McDonald, Elizabeth A Fresh. H. S Carthage Moore 

McDonald, Nell Rose Soph. H. S St. Pauls Bladen 

McGee, Betty Sue Junior H. S Monroe Union 

McGowan, Margaret J Senior H. S Willard Pender 

McGranahan, Rageline Soph. H. S Durham Durham 

McHan, Ruth Graduate H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

McKeel, Myrtle Lamb Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

McLawhorn, Elsie M Soph. H. S Grifton Pitt 

McLawhorn, Loede Senior H. S Hookerton Greene 

McLawhorn, Mamie Unclassified Winterville Pitt 

McLawhorn, Wallace R Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

McLean, Donald E Fresh. H. S Hopewell, Va 

McLellan, Johnnie Senior P Dunn Cumberland 

McMahan, Betty Senior H. S Asheville Buncombe 

McMullan, Charles O Fresh. H. S Elm City Wilson 

McNeely, Gibbon E Fresh. H. S Waxhaw „ Union 

Magill, Betty Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Mallard, Audrey Junior G Trenton Jones 

Mallard, Hilda Soph. H. S Rosehill Duplin 

Maness, Minnie J Senior G Bear Creek Chatham 

Mangum, C. E Fresh. Pre-Engr Petersburg, Va 

Mangum, Elna Mae Soph. H. S Creedmoor Granville 

Mann, Kay Senior H. S Middletown Hyde 

Manning, A. E Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Manning, Corinne Junior H. S Robersonville Pitt 

Manning, Kenneth Soph. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Manning, Lena B Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Manning, Mildred P Graduate G Bethel Pitt 

Manning, Ruffin Soph. H. S Richlands Duplin 

Manning, Zack Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Maready, Lessie Mae Soph. H. S Chinquapin Duplin 

Marks, Elizabeth Unclassified Sanford Lee 

Maroules, Chris Soph. H. S Kinston Lenoir 



200 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Marr, Mary Senior H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Marsh, Carlton T Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Marsh, Mildred Senior H. S Marshville Union 

Martin, Nelle R Graduate P Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Martin, Elizabeth Senior H. S Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Martin, Fred H Junior H. S Asheville Buncombe 

Martin, Marian Gray Soph. H. S Conway Northampton 

Martin, Robert D Senior H. S Rich Square Northampton 

Martindale, Benjamin Fresh. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Mason, Eleanor G Junior H. S Newport Carteret 

Massengill, Mary Thayne Senior H. S Raleigh Wake 

Massey, Sarah Senior H. S Cary Wake 

Matthews, Edna P Unclassified Gates Gates 

Matthews, Helen Best Senior H. S Elm City Wilson 

Matthews, Jack S Fresh. H. S Enfield Halifax 

Matthews, Leonard Fresh. H. S Enfield Halifax 

Matthews, Mary Fresh. H. S Angier Harnett 

Matthews, Thomas S Soph. H. S Apex Wake 

Mattocks, Cornelia Senior P Swansboro Onslow 

Matlock, Elizabeth B Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Maxwell, Marilyn Dell Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

May, Audrey D Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Maynard, Dorothy Senior H. S Smithfield Johnston 

Mayo, Alton P Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Mayo, Hiram Graduate H. S Mesic Pamlico 

Mayo, Mattie Harris Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Mayo, Virginia Junior H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Medlin, Enders H Fresh. H. S Bunn Franklin 

Meeks, Irving E Fresh. H. S Ayden Pitt 

Melvin, Lila Rose Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Mercer. Ann W Soph. P Fountain Pitt 

Mercer, Sarah Graduate Fountain Pitt 

Mercer, Willard R Fresh. Pre-Engr Wilson Wilson 

Merritt, Frances Senior P Goldsboro Wayne 

Merritt, Robert C Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Metcalf, Beatrice Junior H. S Mars Hill Madison 

Mewbern, Robert B., Jr Fresh. H. S Grifton Pitt 

Mewborn, Louise Junior H. S Hookerton Greene 

Mewborn, Ruth Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Midgert, Ellsworth B., Jr Fresh. H. S Manteo Dare 

Midyette, Robert E Fresh. H. S Fairfield Hyde 

Miller, Charles A Fresh. Pre-Engr Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Miller, Robert Junior H. S Asheville Buncombe 

Miller, Ruth P Graduate H. S Neuse Wake 

Mills, Evelyn Soph. H. S Vanceboro Craven 

Mills, Mary E Soph. H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Minshew, W. R., Jr Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Mitchell, Alice H Fresh. P Powellsville Bertie 

Mobley, Delia Jane Junior P Williamston Martin 

Mock, Frank L., Jr Graduate H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Modlin, Allison Senior G Warrenton Warern 

Modlin, Doris M Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Mohorn, Maudgenia Soph. P Enfield Halifax 

Monroe, Omelia Senior H. S St. Pauls Robeson 

Monroe, Richard H Freshman Norfolk, Va 

Montague, James E Fresh. Pre-Law Oxford Granville 



Roster of Students 201 



Name Class Address County 

Montague, Robert C Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Moore, Clifton H Freshman Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Moore, Edith A Senior H. S Bowden Duplin 

Moore, Esther Gail Soph. H. S Bowden Duplin 

Moore, Frances C Senior G Snow Hill Greene 

Moore, Hilda Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Moore, Jeanne C Senior H. S Turkey Sampson 

Moore, Jocelyn Senior G Delco Columbus 

Moore, Louise J Senior H. S Roxboro Person 

Moore, Robert L Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount s Edgecombe 

Moore, Ruth Soph. H. S Timberlake Person 

Moore, Shelton W Fresh. H. S Edenton Chowan 

Moore, Waylon C, Jr Pre-Engr Edenton Chowan 

Moore, William D Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Hopewell, Va 

Morgan, Elizabeth Senior P Carthage Moore 

Morgan, Robert B Senior H. S Lillington Harnett 

Morris, Anne L Senior H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Morris, Dorlas Senior H. S Apex Wake 

M-rris, George E Fresh. H. C Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Morris, Paul R Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Morrisette, Cecil E Fresh. Pre-Engr Norfolk, Va 

Morrisette, William Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Morton, Annie M Fresh. P Carolina Beach New Hanover 

Morton, Eloise Fresh. P Carolina Beach New Hanover 

Morton, Henry H Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Moseley, Theodore G Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Tarboro Edgecombe 

Moseley, Thomas Vernon Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Moss, J. P., Jr Fresh. H. S Stokes Pitt 

Moye, Blanie Allen Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Moye, Charles W Soph. H. C Greenville Pitt 

Moye, Mary Fresh. H. S Walstonburg Greene 

Mumford, Mac L Fresh. H. S Grifton Pitt 

Mumford, Miriam Junior H. S Grifton Pitt 

Munford, Edna Junior G Greenville Pitt 

Murphey, Cecil Ray Fresh. H. C Davis Carteret 

Murphey, Julian Ray Fresh. N. C Davis Carteret 

Murphey, Lottie Mae Junior G Louisburg Franklin 

Murphy, Nell Finch .Senior H. S Henderson Vance 

Murphy, Rebecca Ann Junior H. S Henderson Vance 

Murray, Carlleen G Soph. H. C Newton Catawba 

Murray, L. L Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Murray, Stella V Senior H. S Watha Pender 

Muse, Ida Louise Fresh. H. S Pamlico Pamlico 

Musselwhite, Joseph H Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Musselwhite, Robert R Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Myers, Janice Senior H. S Colerain Bertie 

Nance, Elizabeth Junior G Chadbourn Columbus 

Nash, Frances Fresh. H. S Kannapolis Cabarrus 

Neal, Billie Grey Junior G Smithfield Johnston 

Nelms, Samuel G Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Nelson, Luther S Fresh. Pre-Med Jackson Northampton 

Nelson, Mary Kathryn Senior G Conway Northampton 

Newbern, Margaret Senior P Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Newsome, Doris Soph. G La Grange Wayne 



202 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Newton, Edward L Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Newton, Howard A Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Newton, John Bryan Freshman Greenville Pitt 

Nichols, Curtis Howard Fresh. H. C Greenville Pitt 

Nichols, Elsie Tilman Graduate G Kinston Lenoir 

Nichols, Mary E Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Nobles, Stevens A Fresh. H. S Winterville Pitt 

Oakes, Mildred Agnes Soph. G Hookerton Greene 

Oden, Louise Junior H. S Hatteras Dare 

Odom, Jessie Rose Soph. H. S Mount Olive , Wayne 

Ogburn, Blanche Senior H. S Angier Harnett 

Olive, Leta Senior G Benson Johnston 

O'Neal, Eugene Soph. H. S Belhaven Beaufort 

Oppelt, Joan Mae Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Ostrander, Robert Fresh. H. S Brooklyn, N. Y 

Ourt, Frederick C Fresh. H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Outland, Grace Special Greenville Pitt 

Owen, Helen Junior G Roxboro Person 

Owens, Lorene E Fresh. G Stantonsburg Wilson 

Owens, Mary Frances Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Paige, James C, Jr Freshman Greenville Pitt 

Pake, Daphne Olena Junior H. S Beaufort Carteret 

Pake, Janice Louise Senior P Marshallberg Carteret 

Palmer, Etta H Junior H. S Jarmville Pitt 

Parham, William E Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Oxford Granville 

Parker, Annie Miller Senior H. S Lasker Northampton 

Parker, Burke H Fresh. H. S Williamson Martin 

Parker, Carol Soph. H. S Lasker Northampton 

Parker, Esther L Fresh. H. S Clinton Sampson 

Parker, Etheline Senior G Beulaville Duplin 

Parker, Gilliam L Fresh. Pre-Med Kinston Lenoir 

Parker, Homer V Graduate H. S Murfreesboro Hertford 

Parker, Jeanette Junior H. S Sunbury Gates 

Parker, Maceline L Senior G Pine Level Johnston 

Parker, Mary Lee Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Parker, Mattie Senior H. S Mount Olive Wayne 

Parker, Myrtle B Fresh. H. S Benson. Johnston 

Parker, Ophelia Soph. P Stokes Pitt 

Parker, Shirley Soph. H. S Winton Hertford 

Parkerson, Betsy Ross -Fresh. P Greenville Pitt 

Parkerson, Ralph C Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Parnell, Addie B Fresh. H. S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Partin, Beverly Lloyd Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Partin, Boiling S Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Partin, Virginia Soph. H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Patrick, Edward G Soph. H. S Grifton Pitt 

Patrick, Mildred Soph. P Lillington Harnett 

Patterson, Helen Junior H. S Rose Hill Sampson 

Paul, Elaine Mayo Fresh. H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Paul, Myrtle Agnes Junior H. S Pike Road Beaufort 

Payne, James C Fresh. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Payne, Thomas S Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Payne, Virgil Auditor Greenville Pitt 

Pearson, Melbourne J Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Peedin, Mary Lynn Senior H. S Willow Springs Wake 



Roster of Students 203 



Name Class Address County 

Peedin, Myrtle Junior H. S Willow Springs Wake 

Peel, Gilbert, Jr Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Peel, Mack L Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Peel, Stanley C Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Peele, Allen R Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Peele, Evelyn Junior P Lewiston Bertie 

Pegram, Dorothy M Graduate P Washignton Beaufort 

Pender, Bernese Junior H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Pendleton, Mrs. Hilda C Graduate H. S Greenville Pitt 

Pendleton, Willard V Fresh. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Perkins, Curtis, Jr Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Perry, Annie Sue Graduate H. S Merry Mill Bertie 

Perry, Aydlette H Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Perry, Billie W Junior H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Perry, Delia F Soph. P Greenville Pitt 

Perry, Donald L Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Perry, Janice Ruth Soph. P Louisburg Franklin 

Perry, Mary L Graduate P Raleigh Wake 

Perry, Nell Junior H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Perry, Walter Clard Fresh. H. S Graham Alamance 

Perryman, Paul L., Jr Fresh. H. S Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Petteway, Enid Soph. H. S Jacksonville Onslow 

Phelps, Lola Vaughan Senior G Murfreesboro Hertford 

Phelps, William R., Jr Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Phillips, Annie L Fresh. H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Phillips, Lwellyn Fresh. H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Phillips, SladeW., Jr Soph. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Pickett, Annie Maude Soph. H. S Magnolia Duplin 

Pickett, Sarah Junior H. S Kenansville Duplin 

Finer, Annie Moore Senior P Marshallberg Carteret 

Pipkins, Ozelle Junior H. S Murfreesboro Hertford 

Pippen, Carolyn Fresh. H. S Raleigh Wake 

Pitt, Susan W Soph. H. S Pinetops Edgecombe 

Pittman, Eborn S Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Player, Beatrice Senior H. S Conway, S. C 

Pleasant, Rachel Junior H. S Angier Johnston 

Plyler, Claude Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Pollard, Marjorie Soph. H. S Virgilina, Va 

Poore, Fred Hunter Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Pope, Bruce H., Jr Freshman Scotland Neck Halifax 

Pope, Thurman Fresh. H. S High Point Guilford 

Porter, Helen Fay Senior H. S Grimesland Pitt 

Porter, Joseph B Fresh. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Posey, Neill Soph. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Poteat, Dorothy Graduate H. S Marion McDowell 

Potter, Mary Soph. P Kelly Bladen 

Pournaras, John Fresh. H. S Beaufort Carteret 

Powell, Dorothy Gray Soph. H. S Leland Brunswick 

Powell, Elna Senior H. S Denton Davidson 

Powell, Jean Senior H. S Kerr Sampson 

Powell, Otis Soph. H. S Danville, Va 

Powers, Richard L Soph. Pre-Dental St. Pauls Robeson 

Price, Francis Fresh. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Price, Grover C Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Price, Marvin L Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Hopewell, Va 

Price, Wilmer E Senior G Goldsboro Wayne 



204 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Pridgen, Annette Junior H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Pridgen, Aubrey Fresh. H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Pridgen, Buck Fresh. Pre-Engr Elm CityR. F. D Nash 

Pridgen, Louise Fresh. G Elm City R. F. D Nash 

Pridgen, Sarah Patsy Junior H. S Elm City Wilson 

Priest, Hilda Soph. H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Proctor, Herbert H Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Proctor, Sarah Ann Graduate P Greenville Pitt 

Pruitt, Mildred V Junior H. S Danville, Va 

Purucker, Gilbert B Graduate H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Quinerly, Charles Blount Special Farmville P' 

Quinn, Hilda Nell Soph. H. S Beulaville Duplin 

Radford, Christine Fresh. H. S Kenly Johnston 

Radford, William M Fresh. H. S Selma Johnston 

Roper, Laura L Fresh. H. S Lucama Wilson 

Rasberry, Evelyn .' Fresh. H. S Durham Durham 

Rawl, Edwin Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Rawls, Robert J Fresh. H S Edenton Chowan 

Ray, T.Harriet Senior H. S Raeford Hoke 

Raynor Milton, Jr Fresh. H. S ...Dunn Harnett 

Rea, John E Fresh. H. S Plymouth Washington 

Redditt, Barbara Soph. H. S Aurora , Beaufort 

Redditt, Nina Belle Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Redwine, Ann Graduate P Monroe Union 

Reed, Mrs. Anne W Junior G Norlina Warren 

Regan, Charles T Soph. H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Register, Carolyn Senior H. S Wilmington New Hanover 

Renfrew, Linda Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Reynolds, Edward Soph. H. S Creswell Washington 

Reynolds, Isaac N Soph. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Reynolds, Josephine Junior H. S Clinton Sampson 

Rhodes, Edith Soph. G Castle Hayne New Hanover 

Rice, Charles Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Rich, Helen C Soph. P Garland Sampson 

Richardson, Winfred H Fresh H. S Cerro Gordo Columbus 

Ricks, Elizabeth Auditor Greenville Pitt 

Ricks, Frances Louise Soph. H. S Pantego.... Beaufort 

Ricks, Richard S Fresh. H. S Conway Northampton 

Riddick, Emmet L Fresh. Pre-Dental Gatesville Gates 

Riddick, Sidney W Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Ridenhour, Baxter R Graduate H. S Burlington Alamance 

Riggan, Gloria Fresh. H. S Norfolk, Va 

Riley, Hilda Gray Junior P Wilson Wilson 

Roberson, Emily Jean Junior H. S Parmele Martin 

Roberson, J. R Fresh. H. S Clinton Sampson 

Roberson, Jean Senior H. S Spring Hope Nash 

Roberson, John L Soph. H. S Parmele Martin 

Roberson, Joyce Junior H. S Spring Hope Nash 

Roberts, James Fresh. Pre-Med Greenville Pitt 

Robertson, Charlotte Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Robertson, Mary Frances Soph. H. S Littleton Halifax 

Robertson, Roland G Soph. Pre-Dental Danville, Va 

Robinson, Mary Junior H. S Elizabethtown Bladen 

Robinson, Wilbur Harold Freshman Washington Beaufort 



Roster of Students 205 

Name Class Address County 

Rodgers, James A Fresh. Pre-Engr Plymouth Washington 

Rogers, Aubrey G Soph. H. S Manteo Dare 

Rogers, Javan H Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Rogerson, Marion Senior G Aulander Bertie 

Rogerson, Milson H Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Rollins, Helen T Senior H. S Corinth Chatham 

Rook, John W., Jr Fresh. H. S Bethel Pitt 

Roper, Helen Senior H. S Swan Quarter Hyde 

Ross, Ledyard E Freshman Greenville Pitt 

Ross, Lois Hudnell Freshman Washington, D. C 

Ross, Margaret Graduate P Washington Beaufort 

Rountree, Doris Jean Junior H. S Hobbsville Gates 

Rouse, Egbert T Senior G Grifton Pitt 

Rouse, Mary Elizabeth Soph. H. S La Grange Lenoir 

Rouse, Troy W Unclassified Greenville Pitt 

Rowland, Alba Senior H. S Kittrell Franklin 

Rowlette, Thomas C Special Greenville Pitt 

Rubin, Spencer M Senior H. S Trenton, N. J 

Russ, J. Robert Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Russell, Leonard M Fresh. H. S Dover Craven 

Sadler, Leslie Earl Soph. H. S Winterville Pitt 

Saieed, Betty Lou Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Saieed, Gladys Marie Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Saieed, Pearl Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Saleeby, Frederick J Freshman Wilson Wilson 

Sanders, Betty Jean Junior G Jonesboro Lee 

Sanders, Faye Junior H. S Jonesboro Lee 

Sasser, Annie Lucy Soph. P Rocky Mount Nash 

Satterthwaite, Henry Davis Fresh. H. S Ransomville Beaufort 

Savage, Shirley Senior G Greenville Pitt 

Sawyer, Earl Leon Soph. H. S Jamesville Martin 

Sawyer, Edna Soph. H. S Belcross Camden 

Sawyer, Elizabeth Soph. G Elizabeth City Martin 

Sawyer, Mary Ellen Senior H. S Jamesville Pasquotank 

Sawyer, Samuel B Fresh. H. S , Tarboro Edgecombe 

Schulken, Joseph B Fresh. Pre-Engr Whiteville Columbus 

Scott, Joseph W Fresh. H. S Burlington Alamance 

Scott, Ruby Lee Senior H. S Lucama Wilson 

Scruggs, Charles Junior Pre-Dental.... Greenville Pitt 

Scruggs, Marshall L Fresh. H. S Danville, Va 

Sealey, Annie Ruth Junior H. S Orrum Robeson 

Selby, Barbara Junior H. S Dudley Wayne 

Selby, Camilla Junior H. S Engelhard Wayne 

Selby, Henry B Fresh. H. S Dudley Hyde 

Sellers, Haywood Conrad Freshman Greenville Pitt 

Senter, James P Senior H. S Kipling Harnett 

Senter, Julia Ann Soph. H. S Kipling Harnett 

Septer, Charles K .Freshman Norfolk, Va 

Sermons, Evelyn Soph. H. S Havelock Craven 

Sessoms, Lee Ella Senior G Roseboro Sampson 

Sexton, Amos R Soph. H. S Montgomery, Ala , 

Sexton, Leona K Senior H. S Newton Grove Sampson 

Sharpe, Edna Allene Senior H. S Elm City Wilson 

Shaw, Paul J Fresh. H. S Lexington Davidson 

Shaw, Robert H Graduate H. S Macon -Warren 



206 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Shearin, Anne Senior P Rocky Mount Nash 

Shelton, William T Fresh. H. S Yanceyville Caswell 

Sheppard, J. C Graduate H. S Lexington Davidson 

Sheppard, Mae St. Amand Soph. G Wilmington New Hanover 

Sheppard, Tom H Fresh. Pre-Engr Edenton Chowan 

Sherrod, Hugh B Fresh. H. S Enfield Halifax 

Shields, Margaret Senior H. S New Bern Craven 

Shipp, Betty Jo Fresh. H. S New Bern Craven 

Shuford, Joseph B Pre-Engr Whiteville Columbus 

Shuford, Robert L Soph. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Shugar, Gilbert L Junior Pre-Engr Tarboro Edgecombe 

Silverthorne, Williams D Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Simmons, Mercer W Fresh. H. S .Greenville Pitt 

Simpkins, Doris L Fresh. H. S Ernul Craven 

Simpson, Gladys Evans Senior P Grandy Currituck 

Skinner, Gene Special Greenville Pitt 

Slater, Delia Ann Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Singletary, Richard O Freshman Elizabethtown Bladen 

Slaughter, Joseph B Fresh. Pre-Engr Oxford Granville 

Slaughter, E. Marvin Fresh. H. S Dunn Harnett 

Smith, Ada H Junior H S Kelly Bladen 

Smith, Beth Junior H. S Fuquay Springs Harnett 

Smith, James C Soph. H S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Bettie Frances Senior H. S Willard Pender 

Smith, David H Soph. H. S Ayden Pitt 

Smith, Dean Soph. H. S Deep Run Lenoir 

Smith, Doris Gray Soph. H. S Benson Johnston 

Smith, E. Lewton Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Smith, Edith Sutton Junior P La Grange Lenoir 

Smith, Edna Pearl Soph. P Mount Olive Wayne 

Smith, Edward L Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Smith, Frances R Special Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Grover W.... Fresh. Pre-Dental....La Grange Lenoir 

Smith, Jake Soph. H. S Winterville Pitt 

Smith, James B Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, JaneR Fresh. H. S Newport News, Va 

Smith, John A Fresh. H. S Blackcreek Wilson 

Smith, Leland L Fresh. H. S Seven Springs Wayne 

Smith, Lou E Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Margaret E Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Smith, Mary Frances Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Marian Junior P Ayden Pitt 

Smith, Myrtle S Senior G Hamilton Martin 

Smith, Norman Earl Graduate H. S Selma Johnston 

Smith, Otha E Fresh. H. S Chocowinity Beaufort 

Smith, Pecolia Fisher Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Stella H Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Smith, Ulma Soph. H. S Deep Run Lenoir 

Snipes, Jamie P Graduate H. S Garland Sampson 

Spear, Elbert W Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Speight, H. F., Jr Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Speight, Joseph C Fresh. H. S Stantonsburg Wilson 

Speight, Mary Soph. G Windsor Bertie 

Spence, Stella N Soph. G Tangier, Va 

Spencer, Ruth Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Spivey, William D Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Conway Northampton 



Roster of Students 207 



Name Class Address County 

Squires, Edna Mae Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Stafford, Doris Senior H. S South Mills Camden 

Staley, Cora E ..Junior P Greensboro Guilford 

Stallings, Nellie Junior P Zebulon Wake 

Stallings, Robert S Fresh. Pre-Med Henderson Granville 

Standi, Leland T Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Starling, Edith Junior H. S Clinton Sampson 

Starling, W. L., Jr Freshman Clinton Sampson 

Staton, Mary Lois Graduate G Bethel Pitt 

Steed, James C Fresh. H. S Beaufort Carteret 

Steed, Peggy Fresh. H. S Warsaw Duplin 

Steele, Daisy Junior H. S Winton Hertford 

Stell, Samuel C Fresh. H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Stell, Willie H., Jr Fresh. H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Stephens, Vista Grey Senior H. S Lumberton Robeson 

Stevenson, Lola P Fresh. H. S Willow Spring Johnston 

Stevens, Ruth Durham Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Stilley, Roger Lee Fresh. Pre-Engr Comfort Jones 

Stocks, Elbert L Freshman A Y d e n Pin 

Stoddard, Alan Fresh. Pre-Law Havertown, Pa 

Stoffel, John L Fresh. H. S New London, Conn 

Stokes, Charles L .' Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Stokes, Randolph Clark Junior H. S Hertford Perquimans 

Stone, Bernice Mercer Soph. H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Stott, Blonnie E Soph. H. S Sims Wilson 

Stovall, Barbara Soph. P Bullock Granville 

Strand, Edwin M Fresh. H. S Stanwood, Wash 

Strange, Doris Duke Junior H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Strange, Emma Leigh Senior H. S Louisburg Franklin 

Strawn, Helen Aman Soph. G Greenville Pitt 

Strickland, Joyce Junior H. S Angier Harnett 

Strickland, Lois Graduate P Falcon Cumberland 

Stroud, William R Fresh. H. S Ayden Pitt 

Stublen, William N Fresh. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Styron, Hilton G Fresh. H. S Davis Carteret 

Suber, George C Fresh. Pre-Law Selma Johnston 

Sugg, Dixie Doris Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Sugg, George G Fresh. Pre-Med Grifton Pitt 

Sugg, Louise Fresh. H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Sugg, Marjorie Senior H. S Snow Hill Greene 

Sumrell, Alice Senior H. S Harbinger Currituck 

Sumrell, Dorcas Senior P Ayden Pitt 

Sutton, Anita Soph. H. S La Grange Greene 

Sutton, Effie Elizabeth Junior P La Grange Lenoir 

Sutton, Fannie G Graduate H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Sutton, Frances Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Sutton, Hugh I Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Sutton, William E Fresh. Pre-Dental.... New Bern Craven 

Swanner, John M Soph. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Swanner, Walter D Fresh. H. S Washington -Beaufort 

Swindell, Geraldine Soph. H. S Columbia Tyrrell 

Swindell, Lewis H., Jr Graduate H. S Washington Beaufort 

Swindell, Walter B Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Sykes, Helen Soph. H. S Greensboro Guilford 



208 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Talley, Gladys Fresh. H. S Salisbury Rowan 

Talton, Alfred F Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Talton, Lillian S Junior G Zebulon Wake 

Tarravechia, Dick Fresh. H. S Syracuse, N. Y 

Tartarski, Louis Soph. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Taylor, Annie Junior H. S Pink Hill Lenoir 

Taylor, Belma Lee Graduate H. S Arapahoe Pamlico 

Taylor, Fountain, Jr Junior H. S Richlands Onslow 

Taylor, Grace Helen Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Taylor, Helen Josephine Graduate H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Taylor, Herbert A Fresh. H. S Robersonville Martin 

Taylor, James P Fresh. H. S Birmingham, Mich 

Taylor, Leyta Ozelle Senior H. S Robersonville Martin 

Taylor, Margaret E Soph. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Taylor, Mary Soph. P New Bern Craven 

Taylor, Mary Barden Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Taylor, Paul M Fresh. Pre-Engr Washington Beaufort 

Taylor, Ruth Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Teachey, Doris E Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Teachey, Johnnye Fresh P Rosehill Duplin 

Terrill, Stanley J Fresh. H. S Kearney, N.J 

Tetterton, Louis G Fresh. H. S Aurora Beaufort 

Tew, Joe Soph. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Tew, Ruth A Graduate H. S Clinton Sampson 

Tharrington, Lucille Senior H. S Inez Warren 

Thigpen, Alton H Fresh. Pre-Engr Pink Hill Duplin 

Thigpen, Estelle Special Williamston Martin 

Thigpen, John F., Jr Junior H. S Williamston Martin 

Thomas, Dorothy Soph. P Conetoe Edgecombe 

Thomas, John P Fresh. H. S Weldon Halifax 

Thomas, Margery Lee Junior P Warsaw Duplin 

Thomas, Marjorie L Junior H. S Conetoe Edgecombe 

Thompson, Alfred E Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Thompson, Dwayne Graduate H. S Philadelphia, N. Y 

Thompson, Franklin P Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Thompson, Frostie Soph. H. S Cerro Gordo Columbus 

Thompson, Mar jorie J Fresh. H. S Black Creek Wilson 

Tilley, Lester A Fresh. H. S Roanoke Rapids Halifax 

Todd, Daniel E., Jr Fresh. H S Greenville Pitt 

Toler, La Verne Junior H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Toler, Noah A Fresh. H. S Point Harbor Currituck 

Toms, Ruth Senior H. S Forest City.... Rutherford 

Toothman, Frank J Fresh. Pre-Med Fairview, W. Va 

Tath, Joseph A., Jr Fresh. H. S Mt. Morris, Mich 

Trebuchon, E. Jamie Soph. P Jonesboro Lee 

Tripp, Annie Senior P Washington Beaufort 

Tripp, Bryant Graduate Bethel Pitt 

Trippe, Elizabeth Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Trippe, Mimi Elaine Senior G Greenville Pitt 

Trippe, Thomas S Graduate H. S Ayden Pitt 

Trombetta, Louis A Freshman STew York, N. Y 

Trotman, Joseph C Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Tucker, Charles T Fresh. H. S Hopewell, Va 

Tucker, Jane Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Tucker, M. Florence.. Fresh. H S Greenville Pitt 

Tucker, William M Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 



Roster of Students 209 

Name Class Address County 

Tucker, William W Fresh. H. S Chicod Pitt 

Turnage, Agnes Fresh. H. S La Grange Greene 

Turnage, John A Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Turnage, Lloyd E Fresh. H. S Ayden Pitt 

Turner, Bernice.... Sbph. H. S Richlands Jones 

Turner, Frances Marie Junior G Sharpsburg Wilson 

Turtle, William H Fresh. H. S Raleigh Wake 

Tyndall, Helen Senior G Deep Run Lenoir 

Tyndall, Hortense Soph. H. S Kenansville Duplin 

Tyndall, Wanda Senior H. S Pink Hill Lenoir 

Tyson, Alta Earl Senior G Tarboro Edgecombe 

Tyson, Joseph B Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Tyson, Lois Jones Junior H. S Farmville Pitt 

Uzzell, Raymond Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Umphlet, Howard S Fresh. H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Underwood, Viola G Graduate G Ayden ...Pitt 

Upchuxch, Paul T , Fresh. H. S Raleigh Wake 

Valdes, Ovidio A Fresh. Pre-Med Key West, Fla 

Vail, Joyce M Soph. P Pikeville Wayne 

Van Dyke, Rosamond Graduate G Greenville Pitt 

Vann, Mary Davis Fresh. H. S Clinton Sampson 

Vaughan, Marjorie Junior H. S Rich Square Northampton 

Vegarra, Francis A Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Venters, Calvin E Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Venters, Leslie Senior H. S Grimesland Pitt 

Vincent, William D Fresh. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

Vinci, James A Freshman New Bern Craven 

Wahl, Frances Special Greenville Pitt 

Walker, Doris Senior H. S Currie Pender 

Wall, Numer Clyde Fresh. H. S Norfolk, Va 

Wallace, Alexander Fresh. Pre-Engr Pinetown Beaufort 

Wallace, George R Fresh. H. S Camp Lejeune Onslow 

Wallace, Patsy Fresh. H. S Snow Hill, Md 

Walston, Emily Sawyer Soph. H. S Walstonburg Greene 

Walters, Paul, Jr Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Ward, Dorothy G Soph. H. S Kelly Bladen 

Ward, Margueritte Junior H. S Ryland Chowan 

Ward, Marian Grey Soph. P Nakina Columbus 

Ward, Millard N Fresh. H. S Edenton Chowan 

Warner, Willie H Soph. H. S Thomasville Davidson 

Warren, A. Earl Fresh. H. S Richlands Onslow 

Warren, Allen Fresh. H. S Red Springs Robeson 

Warren, Annie Crisp Junior H. S Conetoe Edgecombe 

Warren, Christine Senior H. S Tarboro Edgecombe 

Warren, Doris J Soph. P , Robersonville Martin 

Warren, Ernestine J .Soph. H. S Godwin Cumberland 

Warren, J. Edgar Fresh. H. S Dunn Harnett 

Warren, Marshall G Fresh. Pre-Dental....Roseboro Sampson 

Warren, Maxine Anne Soph. H. S Roseboro Sampson 

Warren, William P Fresh. Pre-Dental.... Swansboro Onslow 

Waters, Colbert D Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Waters, Olivia Fresh. H. S Pinetown Beaufort 

Waters, James R Fresh. Pre-Engr Washington Beaufort 



210 East Carolina Teachers College 

t 

Name Class address County 

Waters, Sarah Yvonne Junior H. S Fair Bluff Columbus 

Watkins, Mary Ann Senior H. S Oxford Granville 

Watson, David Graduate H. S Southport Brunswick 

Watson, Frances E Senior G Rowland Robeson 

Watson, Jennie Senior H. S Southport Brunswick 

Watts, Retha Mae Junior H. S Whiteville Columbus 

Weathers, Geraldine Fresh. H. S Shelby Cleveland 

Weathers, Sue Soph. H. S Knightdale Wake 

Weathington, Hazel Fresh. P Winterville Pitt 

Webster, Betty J Senior H. S Bonlee Chatham 

Webster, Nell Marie Junior H. S Leaksville Rockingham 

West, Bernard C Fresh. Pre-Pharm.... Greenville Pitt 

West, Charles B., Ill Fresh. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

West, Helen Fresh. H. S Warsaw Duplin 

West, James Lee Senior H. S Yadkinville Yadkin 

West, Richard Senior H. S Fountain Pitt 

Weston, Mary Rose Soph. H. S Garysburg Northampton 

Weston, Robert N Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Weatherington, M. G Fresh. H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Wheeler, Dorothy Senior H. S Benson Johnston 

Wheeler, Robert Soph. Pre-Law Oxford Granville 

Wheeler, David L Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Nash 

Whichard, Hennie Ruth Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whichard, J. Eric Fresh. H. S Stokes Pitt 

Whichard, Mary A Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whichard, Robert D Soph. Pre-Engr Greenville Pitt 

White, Don F Freshman Vanceboro Craven 

White, Frances Lee Senior G Colerain Bertie 

White, Iris Elaine Senior H. S Plymouth Washington 

White, Lloyd W Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

White, Margaret Senior P Norlina Warren 

Whiteford, Charles Freshman Greenville Pitt 

Whitehurst, Betrye Jean Junior G Bethel Pitt 

Whitehurst, Carl Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitehurst, Earline Senior H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Whitehurst, Frances Y Junior G Bethel Pitt 

Whitehurst, Howard Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitehurst, John D Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitehurst, Janelle Fresh. H. S Stokes Pitt 

Whitehurst, Martha Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitehurst, Virginia Fresh. P Robersonville Pitt 

Whiteley, William K .Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitener, Inez Junior G Gastonia Gaston 

Whitfield Annie L Graduate P Sims Wilson 

Whitfield, Dorothy A Fresh. H. S Hurdle Mills Person 

Whitfield, James Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitfield, Marietta Junior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Whitford, Dallas Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Whitley, Alma Lee Junior H. S Enfield Halifax 

Whitley, Ernestine B Junior H. S Pantego Beaufort 

Whitley, Claude B Fresh. H. S Wilson Wilson 

Whitley, Robert B Senior H. S Bethel Pitt 

Wicker, Norman E Freshman Hopewell, Va 

Wiggins, Minnie M Junior H. S Mount Olive Duplin 

Wiggs, Deems N ...Fresh. Pre-Med .Warsaw Duplin 



Roster of Students 211 

Name Class Address County 

Wilkinson, Robert E Fresh. Pre-Engr Pantego Beaufort 

Willard, Doris Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Willey, Harry N Senior H. S Gates Gates 

Williams, Abner Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Williams, Ada R Unclassified Beulaville Duplin 

Williams, Arthur, Jr Sophomore Winterville Pitt 

Williams, Beaufort Junior H. S Inez Warren 

Williams, Charles R Sophomore .Erwin Harnett 

Williams, D. L., Jr Fresh. H. S Sneads Ferry Onslow 

Williams, Edith Fresh. H. S South Mills Camden 

Williams, Frances A Senior H. S Prospect Hill Caswell 

Williams, Isaac L Fresh. H. S Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Williams, Joe Senior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Williams, Laura Fresh. H. S Wilson Wilson 

Williams, Margaret C Senior H. S Seven Springs Lenoir 

Williams, Mary G Soph. H. S New Bern Craven 

Williams, Mary E Soph. H. S Godwin Sampson 

Williams, Ola G Soph. H. S Williamston Martin 

Williams, Sarah Frances Junior H. S Greenville Pitt 

Williamson, Harold D Fresh. Pre-Engr Prince George, Va 

Williford, Lemuel M Fresh. H. S Fayetteville Cumberland 

Willson, Nancy Soph. H. S Roxboro Person 

Wilson, Arnold L., Jr Fresh. Pre-Law Winston-Salem Forsyth 

Wilson, Carroll W Fresh. H. S Oxford Granville 

Wilson, John F., Jr Fresh. H. S Manteo Dare 

Wilson, Richard C Soph. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Windley, William D Fresh. Pre-Engr Pinetown Beaufort 

Winesette, Frank Fresh. H. S Plymouth Washington 

Winfield, Eunice P Unclassified Washington Beaufort 

Winfield, Nellie Senior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Winslow, Helen F Soph. H. S Goldsboro Wayne 

Winslow, Joann Soph. H. S Belvidere Perquimans 

Winstead, Anne Soph. H. S Nashville Nash 

Winston, Johnnie E Fresh. Pre-Engr Knightdale Wake 

Womble, Elizabeth Soph. H. S Nashville Nash 

Womble, Kenneth C Freshman Winston-Salem .Forsythe 

Wood, George W Fresh. H. S Hertford Perquimans 

Wood, Grover C, Jr Fresh. H. S Silverdale Onslow 

Wood, William H Junior H. S Washington Beaufort 

Woodley, W. L., Jr Fresh. H. S Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Woodlief, Jones D Fresh. H. S Stovall Granville 

Woody, Olive Senior P Graham Alamance 

Woolard, Cattie W Unclassified Washington Beaufort 

Woolard, William B Fresh. H. S Washington Beaufort 

Wooten, Mary E Senior H. S Hookerton, R.F.D Lenoir 

Wooten, Mary Louise Senior H. S Kinston Lenoir 

Wooten, Ray Soph. H. S Clinton Sampson 

Worsley, Jerome Fresh. H. S Greenville Pitt 

Worthington, Elizabeth Senior G Winterville P«* 

Wray, Cal A., Jr Fresh. H. S Greensboro Guilford 

Wrenn, Sybil Soph. H. S Roxboro Person 

Wright, Mrs. Charles L Graduate P Washington Beaufort 

Wyatt, John P Fresh. H. S Portsmouth, Va 

Wynne, Dillon C Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Wynne, George E Fresh. H. S Stokes Pitt 



212 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

York, Bernard Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

York, Brantley B Fresh. H. S Williamston Martin 

Younce, Joyce Soph. H. S Boone Watauga 

Younce, Kathryn Soph. H. S..., Boone Watauga 

Young, Frank E Soph. H. S Oxford Granville 

Young, John M Soph. H. S Stonega, Va 

Yow, Archibald C, Jr Senior H. S Henderson Vance 

Zeh, John Douglas Fresh. Pre-Dental Hopewell, Va 

Zuras, Nick J Senior H. S Silver Springs, Md